Special Issue "Binge Eating Disorder 2019"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Claudio Imperatori
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Human Sciences, European University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: eating disorders; binge eating; obesity; overweight; food addiction; psychopathology; neurophysiology; assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonios Dakanalis
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
University of Milano - Bicocca, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Milan, Italy
Interests: Eating Styles and Disorders; Obesity; Aetiopathogenesis; Comorbidity; Dietary Control and Physical Activity; Metabolic Syndrome; Dietetic and Nutritional Interventions; Change Behaviour Techniques; Evidence-Based Practice; Clinical Trials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The clinical significance of binge eating disorder (BED) has been established. Defined by recurrent binge eating (i.e. the consumption of an unambiguously large amount of food accompanied by loss of control over eating) in the absence of extreme weight compensatory behaviours (e.g. purging), BED is a formal eating disorder diagnosis in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

BED, traditionally considered as an adult disorder, occurs in adolescence with some epidemiological evidence highlighting BED as the most prevalent eating disorder in youth. Like BED in adults, this disorder in adolescence is associated with major forms of psychiatric comorbidity and impairment of health-related quality of life. Furthermore, appetite, nutritional and weight issues are an important part of the BED complexity. Indeed, BED is associated with significant morbidity, including medical complications related to excess body weight/mass index, and with significant metabolic abnormalities (a major public health issue).

As such, multidisciplinary approaches, combining medical, dietetic, nutritional and psychological interventions are generally recommended in the treatment of BED. Indeed, effective treatments for BED would ideally address binge eating, associated eating disorders (e.g. body image concerns) and comorbid (e.g. depressive) psychopathology, appetite, nutritional and weight issues and related metabolic dysfunctions.

Translational, population, nutritional and clinically-based research for a deeper understanding of the multifactorial determinants of BED (i.e. relevant behaviours and attitudes towards food, diet and nutrition and associated excess body weight and metabolic dysfunctions) is crucial in order to advance theory and inform policy and evidence-supported practice through the design and evaluation of innovative and complex intervention programmes aiming at enhancing outcomes.

Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide up to date information about the risk and maintenance factors of binge eating and BED. Areas of interest include findings from research capturing when, where and why people overeat and focusing on dietetic, nutritional and psychological interventions (dealing also with food issues and the triggers of binge-eating) and weight-management control, also considering implications for policy and practice.

Dr. Claudio Imperatori
Dr. Antonios Dakanalis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Psychopathology
  • Overeating
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Dietetic Interventions
  • Nutritional Issues and Interventions
  • Psychological Intervetions
  • Food Addiction
  • Metabolic Problems
  • Weight-Management and Control

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Symptom-Checklist-K-9 (SCL-K-9) Discriminates between Overweight/Obese Patients with and without Significant Binge Eating Pathology: Psychometric Properties of an Italian Version
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 674; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12030674 - 01 Mar 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1662
Abstract
A general personality and psychopathology evaluation is considered to be crucial part of the multidisciplinary assessment for weight-related problems. The Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) is commonly used to assess general psychopathology in both overweight and obese patients seeking weight-loss treatment. The main purpose of [...] Read more.
A general personality and psychopathology evaluation is considered to be crucial part of the multidisciplinary assessment for weight-related problems. The Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) is commonly used to assess general psychopathology in both overweight and obese patients seeking weight-loss treatment. The main purpose of the present research was to investigate the psychometric properties of the brief form of the SCL-90-R (i.e., the SCL-K-9) in a clinical sample (N = 397) of patients seeking weight-loss treatment (i.e., bariatric surgery and a nutritional weight-loss program). The results of the confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor solution of the SCL-K-9, with all nine items loading significantly on the common latent factor (lambdas ≥ 0.587). The ordinal α (= 0.91), the inter-item mean indices of correlation (rii = 0.53), and the convergent validity were also satisfactory. A receiver operating characteristic curves procedure showed that both SCL-90-R and SCL-K-9 were able to classify patients with and without significant binge eating pathology according to the Binge Eating Scale (BES) total score. Overall, our results suggest that the SCL-K-9 has adequate psychometric properties and can be applied as a short screening tool to assess general psychopathology in overweight/obese individuals seeking weight-loss treatment and at follow-up interviews when time restraints preclude the use of the full-length form. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binge Eating Disorder 2019)
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Article
Differential Impact of Ad Libitum or Intermittent High-Fat Diets on Bingeing Ethanol-Mediated Behaviors
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2253; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11092253 - 19 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1498
Abstract
Background: Dietary factors have significant effects on the brain, modulating mood, anxiety, motivation and cognition. To date, no attention has been paid to the consequences that the combination of ethanol (EtOH) and a high-fat diet (HFD) have on learning and mood disorders during [...] Read more.
Background: Dietary factors have significant effects on the brain, modulating mood, anxiety, motivation and cognition. To date, no attention has been paid to the consequences that the combination of ethanol (EtOH) and a high-fat diet (HFD) have on learning and mood disorders during adolescence. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biochemical and behavioral consequences of ethanol binge drinking and an HFD consumption in adolescent mice. Methods: Animals received either a standard diet or an HFD (ad libitum vs. binge pattern) in combination with ethanol binge drinking and were evaluated in anxiety and memory. The metabolic profile and gene expression of leptin receptors and clock genes were also evaluated. Results: Excessive white adipose tissue and an increase in plasma insulin and leptin levels were mainly observed in ad libitum HFD + EtOH mice. An upregulation of the Lepr gene expression in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus was also observed in ad libitum HFD groups. EtOH-induced impairment on spatial memory retrieval was absent in mice exposed to an HFD, although the aversive memory deficits persisted. Mice bingeing on an HFD only showed an anxiolytic profile, without other alterations. We also observed a mismatch between Clock and Bmal1 expression in ad libitum HFD animals, which were mostly independent of EtOH bingeing. Conclusions: Our results confirm the bidirectional influence that occurs between the composition and intake pattern of a HFD and ethanol consumption during adolescence, even when the metabolic, behavioral and chronobiological effects of this interaction are dissociated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binge Eating Disorder 2019)
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Article
Prospective Study of Attachment as a Predictor of Binge Eating, Emotional Eating and Weight Loss Two Years after Bariatric Surgery
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1625; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11071625 - 17 Jul 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1605
Abstract
Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for severe obesity, though post-surgical outcomes are variable with respect to long-term weight loss and eating-related psychopathology. Attachment style is an important variable affecting eating psychopathology among individuals with obesity. To date, studies examining eating psychopathology [...] Read more.
Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for severe obesity, though post-surgical outcomes are variable with respect to long-term weight loss and eating-related psychopathology. Attachment style is an important variable affecting eating psychopathology among individuals with obesity. To date, studies examining eating psychopathology and attachment style in bariatric surgery populations have been limited to pre-surgery samples and cross-sectional study design. The current prospective study sought to determine whether attachment insecurity is associated with binge eating, emotional eating, and weight loss outcomes at 2-years post-surgery. Patients (n = 108) completed questionnaires on attachment style (ECR-16), binge eating (BES), emotional eating (EES), depression (PHQ-9), and anxiety (GAD-7). Multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between attachment insecurity and 2-years post-surgery disordered eating and percent total weight loss. Female gender was found to be a significant predictor of binge eating (p = 0.007) and emotional eating (p = 0.023) at 2-years post-surgery. Avoidant attachment (p = 0.009) was also found to be a significant predictor of binge eating at 2-years post-surgery. To our knowledge, this study is the first to explore attachment style as a predictor of long-term post-operative eating pathology and weight outcomes in bariatric surgery patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binge Eating Disorder 2019)
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