Special Issue "Habituation to Dehydration during Exercise: Impact on Health, Physical and Cognitive Performance"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydration".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Éric Goulet
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire de recherche sur la performance, l’hydratation et la thermorégulation; Performance, hydration and thermoregulation laboratory, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 boul. Université Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
Interests: dehydration; exercise performance; heat; hydration; hydration strategy; hyperhydration; instruments validation; sweat sodium concentration; thermoregulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of adequate hydration and nutrition during exercise has been emphasized for years. It is generally commonly admitted that during exercise, dehydration—the dynamic loss of body water through sweat, respiration and urine losses—may handicap physiological functions and subsequently lead to decreased cognitive and physical performance quality. This should not come as a surprise as we humans are primarily composed of water, and the circulating water inside the body plays a role in the regulation of heat loss, the maintenance of cardiac output, oxygen and nutrients delivery to the working muscles, and waste removal. Much of our understanding of how dehydration impacts the capacity of humans to exercise has been acquired through the use of a single, potentially naïve, research paradigm in which the typical participant exercises once while being well-hydrated, and again while being dehydrated, with the researchers not considering the extent of the habituation this participant has had with dealing with daily, repeated training-induced dehydration. It is intuitive to believe that, as it is possible for athletes to adapt to the effect of heat or hypoxia, for example, daily exposures to dehydration could lead to specific adaptations that would render the athlete more resilient to the effect of dehydration, either from a physiological, physical, or cognitive perspective. Research on this topic is in its infancy, but promising. However, results from field studies strongly suggest that humans do possess the intrinsic capacity to habituate to dehydration. Indeed, some of these studies have highlighted that humans can achieve formidable physical performance while being dehydrated by 5 to 10% of their body mass. This Special Issue invites submissions for original laboratory- or field-based studies, as well as case reports, looking at how habituation to dehydration modulates physiological responses to the acute effects of dehydration during exercise and, ultimately, whether this potential adaptative capacity offers some form of protection for physical and cognitive-related performances. Papers reporting on the incidence of health issues in individuals habituated to being dehydrated by daily exercise in warm/hot or humid ambient temperatures are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Éric Goulet
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acclimatization
  • aerobic exercise performance
  • cognitive performance
  • dehydration
  • health
  • heat
  • high-intensity exercise performance
  • hypohydration
  • physiological functions
  • resistance exercise performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Palatable Flavoured Fluids without Carbohydrates and Electrolytes Do Not Enhance Voluntary Fluid Consumption in Male Collegiate Basketball Players in the Heat
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4197; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13124197 (registering DOI) - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 296
Abstract
Using palatable fluids to enhance drinking in athletes who display insufficient compensatory hydration behaviour may mitigate the risks of hypohydration and performance deficits. However, it is unclear whether flavour can independently enhance fluid consumption. This study examined the effects of a colourless, artificially [...] Read more.
Using palatable fluids to enhance drinking in athletes who display insufficient compensatory hydration behaviour may mitigate the risks of hypohydration and performance deficits. However, it is unclear whether flavour can independently enhance fluid consumption. This study examined the effects of a colourless, artificially sweetened flavoured water (FW), without carbohydrates and with negligible amounts of sodium, compared to plain water (W) on fluid consumption in male collegiate basketball players in a practical game setting. Eighteen male basketball players (age 23.1 ± 1.3 years) played a 3v3 basketball small-sided game. The players were randomly assigned to consume either FW or W. Pre-game urine-specific gravity, fluid consumption, body mass, and hedonic taste perceptions were assessed. Basketball performance was analysed through notational analysis. Ratings of perceived exertion and thirst were recorded at pre-, post-game, and at each rest period. Heart rate was recorded throughout the gameplay. Despite significantly higher hedonic ratings for FW than W (6.78 ± 0.83 vs. 5.56 ± 1.33, p = 0.033, d = 1.36), there were no significant differences in fluid consumption (1083 ± 32 mL vs. 1421 ± 403 mL, p = 0.068, d = 0.92). Our result highlighted that using palatable fluids as a strategy to increase fluid consumption during high-intensity gameplay in the heat may not be effective if used without carbohydrates and electrolytes. Practitioners could consider both fluid palatability and composition in establishing a hydration plan for athletes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Hydration Status and Fluid Replacement Strategies of High-Performance Adolescent Athletes: An Application of Machine Learning to Distinguish Hydration Characteristics
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4073; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114073 - 15 Nov 2021
Viewed by 596
Abstract
There are limited data on the fluid balance characteristics and fluid replenishment behaviors of high-performance adolescent athletes. The heterogeneity of hydration status and practices of adolescent athletes warrant efficient approaches to individualizing hydration strategies. This study aimed to evaluate and characterize the hydration [...] Read more.
There are limited data on the fluid balance characteristics and fluid replenishment behaviors of high-performance adolescent athletes. The heterogeneity of hydration status and practices of adolescent athletes warrant efficient approaches to individualizing hydration strategies. This study aimed to evaluate and characterize the hydration status and fluid balance characteristics of high-performance adolescent athletes and examine the differences in fluid consumption behaviors during training. In total, 105 high-performance adolescent athletes (male: 66, female: 39; age 14.1 ± 1.0 y) across 11 sports had their hydration status assessed on three separate occasions—upon rising and before a low and a high-intensity training session (pre-training). The results showed that 20–44% of athletes were identified as hypohydrated, with 21–44% and 15–34% of athletes commencing low- and high-intensity training in a hypohydrated state, respectively. Linear mixed model (LMM) analyses revealed that athletes who were hypohydrated consumed more fluid (F (1.183.85)) = 5.91, (p = 0.016). Additional K-means cluster analyses performed highlighted three clusters: “Heavy sweaters with sufficient compensatory hydration habits,” “Heavy sweaters with insufficient compensatory hydration habits” and “Light sweaters with sufficient compensatory hydration habits”. Our results highlight that high-performance adolescent athletes with ad libitum drinking have compensatory mechanisms to replenish fluids lost from training. The approach to distinguish athletes by hydration characteristics could assist practitioners in prioritizing future hydration intervention protocols. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop