Special Issue "Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Javier Sanz-Valero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Escuela Nacional de Medicina del Trabajo, Sinesio Delgado Street 10, 28029, Madrid, Spain
Interests: occupational health; nutritional status of workers; public health; communication and scientific documentation related to nutrition
Dr. Elena Ronda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Public Health Area, University of Alicante, Carretera San Vicente del Raspeig s/n 03690, Alicante, Spain
Interests: occupational health; health promotion; inequalities in health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition and occupational health is the maintenance and promotion of the highest degree of physical, mental, and social health of workers in all occupations by controlling risks, promoting healthy eating, providing humanitarian aid, improving health systems, and preventing the departures from health. Occupational health is the advancement and upkeep of the most astounding level of physical, mental, and social health of specialists in all occupations by preventing departures from wellbeing, controlling dangers, and the adjustment of work to individuals, and individuals to their jobs.

This Special Issue will publish selected documents that deepen our knowledge of specific and innovative aspects of diet, food, and nutrition related to occupational health. Strategies to change the incidence and prevalence of nutritional disorders in workers include a focus on changing physical and social environments, over and above individual-level strategies, using a multilevel or systems approach. We hope the articles in this Special Issue can help inform the decisions of employers, planners, researchers, and other public health decision-makers.

Prof. Dr. Javier Sanz-Valero
Prof. Elena Ronda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet, food, and nutrition
  • Occupational health
  • Occupational diseases
  • Nutrition disorders

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Study of Food Intake and Physical Activity Patterns in the Working Population of the Uruguayan State Electrical Company (UTE): Design, Protocol and Methodology
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3545; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103545 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 385
Abstract
Noncommunicable diseases are the main cause of death globally, and most are potentially preventable; they are long term diseases and generally evolve slowly. In Uruguay 64.9% of the population between 25 and 64 years of age are either overweight or obese. The available [...] Read more.
Noncommunicable diseases are the main cause of death globally, and most are potentially preventable; they are long term diseases and generally evolve slowly. In Uruguay 64.9% of the population between 25 and 64 years of age are either overweight or obese. The available scientific data show that workplaces are good for developing food-intake interventions for a healthier life. The present study aims to report the design, protocol and methodology for the evaluation of the food intake and physical activity patterns of the Uruguayan State Electrical Company (UTE) workers, as it is distributed across the whole country, and has established associations with overweight and obesity in order to establish institutional strategies to improve the situation. This study uses a population and a cross-sectional, randomized, representative sample of UTE workers with a precision of 3% and a confidence level of 95%. The considered anthropometric variables are weight, height, waist circumference, percentage of fat mass and percentage of visceral fat. A questionnaire on frequency of consumption of different foods and two 24-h dietary recalls (24-h DR) will be performed to evaluate the food intake. Accelerometry will be used to evaluate physical activity, and the International physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ) will be applied. Clinical data will be obtained from the UTE clinical charts. This is the first study of its kind that will be undertaken in Uruguay. It is registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier nº NCT04509908. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health)
Article
Trends in Diet Quality and Related Sociodemographic, Health, and Occupational Characteristics among Workers in Spain: Results from Three Consecutive National Health Surveys (2006–2017)
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 522; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020522 - 05 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Poor dietary practices are commonly reported in working populations from different economic sectors, resulting in increased absenteeism and a decrease in productivity. The aims of this study were to describe the frequency of food consumption and diet quality in workers aged ≥16 years [...] Read more.
Poor dietary practices are commonly reported in working populations from different economic sectors, resulting in increased absenteeism and a decrease in productivity. The aims of this study were to describe the frequency of food consumption and diet quality in workers aged ≥16 years from 2006 to 2017 in Spain and to evaluate the factors associated with diet quality. A nationwide cross-sectional study was carried out among workers using data from the Spanish National Health Surveys in 2006 (n = 11,068), 2011 (n = 7497) and 2017 (n = 8890). Sociodemographic, occupational, and health-related variables were used as well as diet quality data. A multiple linear regression was performed to determine the characteristics related to overall diet quality. The percentage of workers who consumed vegetables, at most, once or twice per week decreased from 2006 to 2017 (p < 0.001). A lower diet quality score was related to the consumption of tobacco and alcohol and being aged ≥25 years old, while a higher diet quality score was linked to being a woman, having Spanish nationality, receiving optimal perceived social support, being physically active in one’s main occupation, doing leisure-time physical activity, and the type of contract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health)
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Article
Differences in the Prevalence of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Spanish Workers
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3848; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123848 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 835
Abstract
The present study aims to examine the differences in daily fruit and vegetable consumption in the working population in Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted, using data from the 2017 National Health Survey (n = 10,700 workers aged between 18 and 65 [...] Read more.
The present study aims to examine the differences in daily fruit and vegetable consumption in the working population in Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted, using data from the 2017 National Health Survey (n = 10,700 workers aged between 18 and 65 years). The daily consumption of fruit and vegetables was evaluated using two items included in a food frequency questionnaire. Occupations were classified into the 17 main groups of the National Classification of Occupations of 2011 (CNO-11). The prevalence (P) of daily fruit and vegetable consumption was calculated in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, work-related characteristics and occupations. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association, with simple and adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR). The P of daily consumption of fruit and vegetables in workers was 60% for fruit and 40% for vegetables. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health behaviors, workers working night or rotating shifts had a lower consumption of fruits (aOR:0.9; p < 0.05), and those working on temporary contracts had a lower consumption of vegetables (aOR:0.8; p < 0.05). Engineers, scientists, health care workers and teachers had the highest fruit consumption (74.5%) and the highest vegetable consumption (55.1%). The lowest consumption of fruits was presented by the military (42.3%) and unskilled workers in the service sector (45.8%), and the lowest consumption of vegetables was presented by skilled construction workers (25.5%). These findings could aid in workplace health promotion and could be used in future studies to evaluate the impact of the activities adopted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health)
Article
Age, Gender and Season Are Good Predictors of Vitamin D Status Independent of Body Mass Index in Office Workers in a Subtropical Region
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2719; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12092719 - 05 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 947
Abstract
This study aimed at determining the prevalence and predictors of hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D < 30 ng/mL) among office workers in a subtropical region from an electronic hospital database. Totally, 2880 office workers aged 26–65 years who received health examinations with vitamin [...] Read more.
This study aimed at determining the prevalence and predictors of hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D < 30 ng/mL) among office workers in a subtropical region from an electronic hospital database. Totally, 2880 office workers aged 26–65 years who received health examinations with vitamin D status and total calcium concentrations at a tertiary referral center were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were divided into groups according to genders, age (i.e., 26–35, 36–45, 46–55, 56–65), body-mass index (BMI) (i.e., obese BMI ≥ 30, overweight 25 ≤ BMI < 30, normal 20 ≤ BMI < 25, and underweight BMI < 20) and seasons (spring/winter vs. summer/autumn) for identifying the predictors of hypovitaminosis D. Corrected total calcium level <8.4 mg/dL is considered as hypocalcemia. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that females (AOR 2.33, (95% CI: 1.75, 3.09)), younger age (4.32 (2.98, 6.24), 2.82 (1.93, 4.12), 1.50 (1.03, 2.17)), and season (winter/spring) (1.55 (1.08, 2.22)) were predictors of hypovitaminosis D, whereas BMI was not in this study. Despite higher incidence of hypocalcemia in office workers with hypovitaminosis D (p < 0.001), there was no association between vitamin D status and corrected total calcium levels. A high prevalence (61.9%) of hypovitaminosis D among office workers in a subtropical region was found, highlighting the importance of this occupational health issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health)
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Systematic Review
Free-Living Dietary Intake in Tactical Personnel and Implications for Nutrition Practice: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3502; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103502 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 517
Abstract
Tactical personnel (including military, law enforcement, and fire and rescue) are responsible for ensuring national and public safety. Dietary intake is an important consideration to support optimal health and performance. The aims of this systematic review were to: (1) describe the reported free-living [...] Read more.
Tactical personnel (including military, law enforcement, and fire and rescue) are responsible for ensuring national and public safety. Dietary intake is an important consideration to support optimal health and performance. The aims of this systematic review were to: (1) describe the reported free-living dietary intake (energy and macronutrients) of tactical personnel, and (2) describe the practical implications of reported dietary intakes to support the physical and dietary requirements of tactical personnel. A systematic search of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Science) was conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. English and full text research articles were identified and screened against inclusion and exclusion criteria. Demographic and dietary intake data were extracted, tabulated, and synthesized narratively. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Criteria Checklist. Twenty-two studies (15 military, 4 law enforcement, and 2 fire and rescue) were eligible to inform this review. The volume of evidence suggested that tactical personnel met dietary protein and exceeded dietary fat recommendations but failed to meet energy and carbohydrate recommendations. Therefore, practical approaches to support optimized energy, fat and carbohydrate intake in tactical personnel is important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Food and Nutrition and Occupational Health)
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