Special Issue "Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Policies and Education for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Santiago Navas-Carretero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Center for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008, Spain
Interests: obesity and metabolic syndrome; nutritional intervention studies; functional foods; nutritional education
Dr. Moira A. Taylor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham
Interests: obesity and comorbidities; nutritional education; human nutritional interventions; disease-related undernutrition; phytochemicals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Having knowledge and conducting research around nutrition does not necessarily mean that one is able to communicate that knowledge to the general public and encourage them to modify their nutrition behavior accordingly. This issue is of great importance, and it is thus mandatory to know how to communicate one’s knowledge around nutrition to the general public, thereby making nutrition sciences available to and applicable for adults and children.

With this purpose, this Special Issue is targeted at both making knowledge available to a wider audience and, secondly, to bringing forth the most novel and up-to-date nutritional education.

Dr. Santiago Navas-Carretero
Dr. Moira A. Taylor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutritional education
  • Dietary guidelines
  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Risk of obesity and related diseases
  • Nutritional communication

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Associations between Dairy Intake, Body Composition, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Spanish Schoolchildren: The Cuenca Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2940; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11122940 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1304
Abstract
Full-fat dairy has been traditionally associated with obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, recent evidence shows that the amount of dairy intake might have a beneficial effect over these pathologies, regardless of their fat content. The aim of this study was to examine [...] Read more.
Full-fat dairy has been traditionally associated with obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, recent evidence shows that the amount of dairy intake might have a beneficial effect over these pathologies, regardless of their fat content. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the intake of dairy products (including milk with different fat contents) with both adiposity and serum lipid concentration, adjusted by cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), in Spanish schoolchildren. A cross-sectional study of 1088 children, aged 8 to 11 years, was conducted in which anthropometric variables (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fat mass percentage (FM%) and fat mass index (FMI)), blood lipid profile, and dairy intake (using a food frequency questionnaire), and CRF (through a 20-m shuttle run test) were measured. Results showed that children with lower BMI, WC, FM%, and FMI had higher whole-fat milk intake and lower skimmed and semi-skimmed milk intake than children with higher BMI, WC, FM%, and FMI. Children with normal levels of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins (HLD) cholesterol consumed more whole-fat milk and less reduced-fat milk than children with dyslipidemic patterns. These relationships persisted after adjustment for CRF. Our findings suggest that full-fat milk intake should be promoted in children without obesity or high cardiometabolic risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Article
Trends in Dietary Nutrients by Demographic Characteristics and BMI among US Adults, 2003–2016
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2617; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11112617 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1613
Abstract
Background: Limited data were available on trends of US dietary nutrients especially for specific subgroups; Methods: Dietary intakes of energy and 36 kinds of nutrients were analyzed in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2016 and by age [...] Read more.
Background: Limited data were available on trends of US dietary nutrients especially for specific subgroups; Methods: Dietary intakes of energy and 36 kinds of nutrients were analyzed in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2016 and by age and sex, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and body mass index, which were evaluated by whether not they meet the dietary reference intakes (DRIs); Results: Significantly decreased trends were observed for carbohydrate, total sugars, fiber, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B6, E, K, and choline, while increased trends were observed for saturated fatty acids, iron, zinc, copper, potassium, sodium, vitamin B1, B2, B12, C and folate DFE (as dietary folate equivalents). A decreased trend of exceeding the estimated energy requirement was found. Population with low socioeconomic status and non-Hispanic blacks accounted for the largest proportion not meeting DRIs for most of nutrients; Conclusions: Most dietary nutrients were improved among US adults from 2003 to 2016 but were still far from optimal levels. Populations with low socioeconomic status and non-Hispanic blacks should be paid more attention to improve their dietary nutrient intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Eating Healthy, Growing Healthy: Outcome Evaluation of the Nutrition Education Program Optimizing the Nutritional Value of Preschool Menus, Poland
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2438; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11102438 - 13 Oct 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1910
Abstract
Staff education can improve the quality of nutrition in childcare centers, but an objective assessment of the change is necessary to assess its effectiveness. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the multicomponent educational program for improving the nutritional value of preschools menus in [...] Read more.
Staff education can improve the quality of nutrition in childcare centers, but an objective assessment of the change is necessary to assess its effectiveness. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the multicomponent educational program for improving the nutritional value of preschools menus in Poland measured by the change in nutrients content before (baseline) and 3–6 months after education (post-baseline). A sample of 10 daily menus and inventory reports reflecting foods and beverages served in 231 full-board government-sponsored preschools was analyzed twice: at baseline and post-baseline (in total 4620 inventory reports). The changes in 1. the supply of nutrients per 1 child per day; 2. the nutrient-to-energy ratio of menus; 3. the number of preschools serving menus consistent with the healthy diet recommendations, were assessed. Education resulted in favorable changes in the supply of energy, fat and saturated fatty acids. The nutrient-to-energy ratio for vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C, folate and minerals Calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc increased significantly. The percentage of preschools implementing the recommendations for energy, share of fat, saturated fatty acids and sucrose as well as calcium, iron and potassium increased significantly. However, no beneficial effects of education on the content of iodine, potassium, vitamin D and folate were observed. This study indicates the potentially beneficial effect of education in optimizing the quality of the menu in preschools. However, the magnitude of change is still not sufficient to meet the nutritional standards for deficient nutrients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Diet Quality Affects the Association between Census-Based Neighborhood Deprivation and All-Cause Mortality in Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2194; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11092194 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1619
Abstract
Background: Individuals residing in more deprived areas with a lower diet quality might have a higher mortality risk. We aimed to examine the association between deprivation within an area and all-cause mortality risk according to diet quality. Methods: We conducted a population-based prospective [...] Read more.
Background: Individuals residing in more deprived areas with a lower diet quality might have a higher mortality risk. We aimed to examine the association between deprivation within an area and all-cause mortality risk according to diet quality. Methods: We conducted a population-based prospective study on 27,994 men and 33,273 women aged 45–75 years. Neighborhood deprivation was assessed using the Japanese areal deprivation index (ADI). Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated 147-item food frequency questionnaire. Results: Individuals residing in the most deprived area had the lowest dietary scores. During the 16.7-year follow-up, compared to individuals with a high quality diet residing in the least deprived area, individuals with a low quality diet had a higher risk of mortality according to increment of ADI (p trend = 0.03); the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.09 (0.999–1.19), 1.17 (1.08–1.27), and 1.19 (1.08–1.32) in those residing in the lowest through the highest third of ADI, respectively. However, individuals with a high quality diet had no significant association between ADI and mortality. Conclusion: A well-balanced diet may prevent early death associated with neighborhood socioeconomic status among those residing in highly deprived areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Effects of Nutritional Education Interventions on Metabolic Risk in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 31; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12010031 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2298
Abstract
Childhood obesity is a global public health issue and is linked to metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Social, economic and cultural factors influence changes in nutrition and lifestyle characterized by poorer [...] Read more.
Childhood obesity is a global public health issue and is linked to metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Social, economic and cultural factors influence changes in nutrition and lifestyle characterized by poorer diets and reduced physical activity. This systematic review summarizes the evidence for nutritional education interventions to improve metabolic risks in children and adolescents. Systematic searches of the databases Medline (via PubMed) and Scopus were conducted following PRISMA guidelines. The risk of bias for each study was assessed following the methodology of the Cochrane Collaboration. Ten case-controlled and randomized controlled studies testing nutritional educational interventions targeting children and adolescents from the general population were eligible for inclusion. The sample size was 3915 and the age range was 7–20 years. The duration of intervention ranged from 12 weeks to 20 years. All the studies that provided data on abdominal obesity reported differences in favour of the intervention. However, data on the effects on the remaining components of metabolic syndrome remain inconclusive. These results support the role of nutritional education interventions as a strategy to reduce central adiposity and its possible unhealthy consequences in children and adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop