Special Issue "Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Benno Zimmermann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional and Food Sciences, University of Bonn, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Interests: HPLC; UHPLC; polyphenols; flavonoids; food analysis; metabolites; bioavailability; green tea; cocoa
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sabine Ellinger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Nutrition, Food, and Hospitality Sciences, Niederrhein, University of Applied Sciences, 22765 Hamburg, Germany
Interests: antioxidants; dietary interventions and wound healing; cocoa; flavanol; prevention and cardiometabolic effects
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A large variety of polyphenols are present in almost all plant-derived foods. The results of many studies are promising, especially with regard to cardiovascular health. For example, flavanols from cocoa have been shown to increase vascular elasticity and lower blood pressure. Functional cocoa products with an elevated flavanol content have been designed and marketed. Currently, many plant extracts from polyphenol-rich foods, as well as isolated polyphenols, are available as dietary supplements.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) such as coronary heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, prevention or cure by nutritional components such as polyphenols could increase the life span and quality of millions of people.

This Special Issue of Nutrients entitled “Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health” welcomes the submission of manuscripts providing either original research or reviews on the current state of research. This Special Issue intends to include all aspects of this topic, such as:

  • Analysis or identification of putatively effective polyphenols in food;
  • Novel sources of polyphenols or the design of polyphenol-rich food;
  • Studies on the bioavailability, kinetics, or mechanism of action of polyphenols;
  • Human studies, especially randomized controlled trials, on polyphenols and polyphenol-rich food.

This list is not exhaustive. If you do not see your research represented here, please contact the Guest Editors.

Dr. Benno Zimmermann
Prof. Dr. Sabine Ellinger
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenols
  • polyphenol-rich food
  • cardiometabolic effects
  • cardiovascular health
  • human studies
  • bioavailability

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Effect of Coffee and Cocoa-Based Confectionery Containing Coffee on Markers of DNA Damage and Lipid Peroxidation Products: Results from a Human Intervention Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2399; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072399 - 13 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1116
Abstract
The effect of coffee and cocoa on oxidative damage to macromolecules has been investigated in several studies, often with controversial results. This study aimed to investigate the effect of one-month consumption of different doses of coffee or cocoa-based products containing coffee on markers [...] Read more.
The effect of coffee and cocoa on oxidative damage to macromolecules has been investigated in several studies, often with controversial results. This study aimed to investigate the effect of one-month consumption of different doses of coffee or cocoa-based products containing coffee on markers of DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in young healthy volunteers. Twenty-one volunteers were randomly assigned into a three-arm, crossover, randomized trial. Subjects were assigned to consume one of the three following treatments: one cup of espresso coffee/day (1C), three cups of espresso coffee/day (3C), and one cup of espresso coffee plus two cocoa-based products containing coffee (PC) twice per day for 1 month. At the end of each treatment, blood samples were collected for the analysis of endogenous and H2O2-induced DNA damage and DNA oxidation catabolites, while urines were used for the analysis of oxylipins. On the whole, four DNA catabolites (cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), 8-OH-2′-deoxy-guanosine, 8-OH-guanine, and 8-NO2-cGMP) were detected in plasma samples following the one-month intervention. No significant modulation of DNA and lipid damage markers was documented among groups, apart from an effect of time for DNA strand breaks and some markers of lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, the consumption of coffee and cocoa-based confectionery containing coffee was apparently not able to affect oxidative stress markers. More studies are encouraged to better explain the findings obtained and to understand the impact of different dosages of these products on specific target groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
ACE Inhibitory and Antihypertensive Activities of Wine Lees and Relationship among Bioactivity and Phenolic Profile
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 679; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020679 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1328
Abstract
Wine lees (WL) are by-products generated in the winemaking process. The aim of this study was to investigate the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEi) activity, and the blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of WL from individual grape varieties. The relationship among their activities and [...] Read more.
Wine lees (WL) are by-products generated in the winemaking process. The aim of this study was to investigate the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEi) activity, and the blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of WL from individual grape varieties. The relationship among their activities and phenolic profiles was also studied. Three WL, from Cabernet, Mazuela, and Garnacha grape varieties, were firstly selected based on their ACEi properties. Their phenolic profiles were fully characterized by UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS. Then, their potential antihypertensive effects were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). BP was recorded before and after their oral administrations (2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 48 h) at a dose of 5 mL/kg bw. Cabernet WL (CWL) exhibited a potent antihypertensive activity, similar to that obtained with the drug Captopril. This BP-lowering effect was related to the high amount of anthocyanins and flavanols present in these lees. In addition, a potential hypotensive effect of CWL was discarded in normotensive Wistar–Kyoto rats. Finally, the ACEi and antihypertensive activities of CWL coming from a different harvest were confirmed. Our results suggest the potential of CWL for controlling arterial BP, opening the door to commercial use within the wine industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
A Randomized Crossover Intervention Study on the Effect a Standardized Maté Extract (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.) in Men Predisposed to Cardiovascular Risk
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 14; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13010014 - 23 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1228
Abstract
(1) Background: Due to its richness in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), Maté (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.) could be of interest in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases, however clinical evidence are lacking. This trial aimed to evaluate the impact of maté CGAs, consumed in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Due to its richness in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), Maté (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.) could be of interest in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases, however clinical evidence are lacking. This trial aimed to evaluate the impact of maté CGAs, consumed in a daily dose achievable through traditional maté beverages, on parameters related to cardiometabolic risk. (2) Design: Thirty-four male volunteers aged 45–65 years and with at most one criteria of metabolic syndrome, were recruited for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and crossover study. The volunteers were assigned to consume an encapsulated dry maté extract for four-weeks, providing 580 mg of caffeoyl quinic acid derivatives (CQAs) daily, or a placebo, with a two weeks washout between intervention periods. Anthropometric variables, blood pressure, plasma glucose, lipids, endothelial, and inflammatory biomarkers were measured in overnight-fasted subjects and after a glucose load. (3) Results: We found no significant effects of treatment on these parameters and the response to the glucose load was also similar between the two interventions. However, a significant decrease in fasting glucose was observed between day 0 and day 28 for the maté group only (−0.57 ± 0.11 mmol/L, p < 0.0002). In subjects with an intermediate to high Framingham risk score, consumption of maté extract induced a 10% increase of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-c from baseline. In a subgroup representative of the study population, significant decreases in the C-reactive protein (CRP) (−50%) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (−19%) levels were observed. (4) Conclusions: These clinical observations suggest that maté, naturally rich in CGAs, could improve some cardiometabolic markers in subjects with a higher predisposition to metabolic syndrome, even if that remains to be confirmed in new trials specifically targeting this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Impact of Epicatechin on the Procoagulant Activities of Microparticles
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 2935; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12102935 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 984
Abstract
Microparticles play a role in cardiovascular disease pathology. The flavanol-like epicatechin is increasingly considered due to its cardioprotective effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of epicatechin on microparticle generation, phenotype and procoagulant properties. Plasma samples from 15 healthy [...] Read more.
Microparticles play a role in cardiovascular disease pathology. The flavanol-like epicatechin is increasingly considered due to its cardioprotective effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of epicatechin on microparticle generation, phenotype and procoagulant properties. Plasma samples from 15 healthy subjects were incubated with increasing concentrations of epicatechin (1 to 100 μM). Then, the expression of glycoprotein IIb, phosphatidylserine (PS), glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and P-selectin was assessed by flow cytometry analysis after (or not) platelet stimulation. Microparticle procoagulant activity was determined using ZymuphenTM MP and ZymuphenTM MP-TF for phospholipid and tissue factor content, and with thrombin generation (TG) assays for procoagulant function. Platelet microparticles that express GPIb (/µL) decreased from 20,743 ± 24,985 (vehicle) to 14,939 ± 14,333 (p = 0.6), 21,366 ± 16,949 (p = 0.9) and 15,425 ± 9953 (p < 0.05) in samples incubated with 1, 10 and 100 µM epicatechin, respectively. Microparticle concentration (nM PS) decreased from 5.6 ± 2.0 (vehicle) to 5.1 ± 2.2 (p = 0.5), 4.5 ± 1.5 (p < 0.05) and 4.7 ± 2.0 (p < 0.05) in samples incubated with 1, 10 and 100µM epicatechin, respectively. Epicatechin had no impact on tissue factor-positive microparticle concentration. Epicatechin decreased TG (endogenous thrombin potential, nM.min) from 586 ± 302 to 509 ± 226 (p = 0.3), 512 ± 270 (p = 0.3) and 445 ± 283 (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that epicatechin affects microparticle release, phenotype and procoagulant properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Polyphenols Rich Diets and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1445; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051445 - 24 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1522
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is an increasing health concern worldwide. Both genetic and environmental risk factors as improper dietary habits or physical inactivity are known to be crucial in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols are a group of plant-derived compounds with anti-inflammatory [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes is an increasing health concern worldwide. Both genetic and environmental risk factors as improper dietary habits or physical inactivity are known to be crucial in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols are a group of plant-derived compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that are associated with a low prevalence of metabolic conditions characterized by insulin resistance, including obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Moreover, there is now full awareness that foods that are rich in phytochemicals and polyphenols could play an important role in preserving human cardiovascular health and substantial clinical evidence indicates that regular dietary consumption of such foods affects favorably carbohydrate metabolism. This review briefly summarizes the evidence relating dietary patterns rich in polyphenols with glucose metabolism and highlights the potential benefits of these compounds in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Health)
Back to TopTop