Special Issue "Hypertension with Diabetes Mellitus: Dietary Risk and Intervention"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Diabetes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Clive J. Petry
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
Interests: diabetes; metabolism; hypertension; growth; development; imprinted genes; biomarkers; nutritional therapies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus, in all its various forms but especially type 2, is intimately linked to hypertension. Indeed, these conditions are risk factors for each other, with the mechanism underpinning the link thought to be related to insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, and/or oxidative stress. A nutritionally poor diet can contribute to the shared aetiology of both conditions. Treatment for both diabetes and hypertension is underpinned by the diet (e.g., carbohydrate counted/low salt diets), even if additional pharmacotherapeutic approaches are often also used. In this Special Issue, through the publication of reviews and original papers, we aim to highlight the treatment effects that nutrition can have on diabetes and hypertension as well as on their risk factors, metabolic syndrome, and the clinical complications that they can cause. Another intention is to feature dietary effects on the risk of developing diabetes and hypertension.

Dr. Clive J. Petry
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diabetes (type 1/type 2/gestational/rare forms)
  • hypertension
  • metabolic syndrome
  • gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia
  • insulin resistance
  • obesity
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress
  • nutritional therapies
  • nutritional biomarkers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Associations between Maternal Iron Supplementation in Pregnancy and Changes in Offspring Size at Birth Reflect Those of Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2480; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072480 - 20 Jul 2021
Viewed by 879
Abstract
It was previously observed that in a population of a high-income country, dietary multiple micronutrient supplementation in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) and increased offspring size at birth. In this follow-up study, we investigated whether similar changes [...] Read more.
It was previously observed that in a population of a high-income country, dietary multiple micronutrient supplementation in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) and increased offspring size at birth. In this follow-up study, we investigated whether similar changes are observed with dietary iron supplementation. For this we used the prospective Cambridge Baby Growth Study with records of maternal GDM status, nutrient supplementation, and extensive offspring birth size measurements. Maternal iron supplementation in pregnancy was associated with GDM development (risk ratio 1.67 (1.01–2.77), p = 0.048, n = 677) as well as offspring size and adiposity (n = 844–868) at birth in terms of weight (β’ = 0.078 (0.024–0.133); p = 0.005), head circumference (β’ = 0.060 (0.012–0.107); p = 0.02), body mass index (β’ = 0.067 (0.014–0.119); p = 0.01), and various skinfold thicknesses (β’ = 0.067–0.094; p = 0.03–0.003). In a subset of participants for whom GDM statuses were available, all these associations were attenuated by adjusting for GDM. Iron supplementation also attenuated the associations between multiple micronutrient supplementation and these same measures. These results suggest that iron supplementation may mediate the effects associated with multiple micronutrient supplementation in pregnancy in a high-income country, possibly through the increased risk of developing GDM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypertension with Diabetes Mellitus: Dietary Risk and Intervention)
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