Special Issue "Chronic Inflammation: Pathophysiological Processes and Nutritional Interventions"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giovanna Trinchese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: nutrition; metabolic efficiency; obesity; inflammation; mitochondrial function; oxidative stress; diet-induced disorders
Prof. Maria Pina Mollica
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: mitochondria; energy metabolism; obesity and insulin resistance; oxidative stress; inflammation
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Chronic low-grade systemic inflammation has been recognized as the most critical pathophysiological mechanism directly implicated in a wide range of disorders encompassing almost all non-communicable diseases including autoimmune and neurological disorders, obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Several causes of low-grade systemic chronic inflammation and their consequences have been identified, although how to reverse chronic inflammatory-related processes to improve human health and longevity remain a topic of debate. Increasing epidemiological evidence have attributed to nutritional changes the rise of chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this special issue is to assemble a collection of original research and review articles describing the link between nutritional interventions and metabolic and immune regulatory processes controlling inflammation. Manuscript that investigate regulatory mechanisms and pathologies related to inflammation focusing on the critical role of the nutrition, will be considered. Studies that provide details about the protective abilities of antioxidants, phytochemicals, fatty acids, micronutrients and novel dietary regimen on the onset and progression of inflammatory diseases will be also welcomed. These data collection may form a comprehensive picture of innovative intervention to target the inflammation, suggesting effective strategies for improving human health.

Dr. Giovanna Trinchese
Prof. Maria Pina Mollica
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Preventive and/or therapeutical nutritional interventions
  • Human health
  • Metabolic/inflammatory disorders
  • Overnutrition
  • Immune regulatory processes
  • Non-communicable diseases
  • Interplay between metabolic alterations and neuroinflammation
  • Crosstalk gut-liver-brain

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Daily Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) Consumption on High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Healthy Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3620; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103620 - 15 Oct 2021
Viewed by 550
Abstract
Interventions to decrease inflammation and improve metabolic function hold promise for the prevention of obesity-related diseases. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring compound that demonstrates antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Improvements in measures of metabolic health have been observed in mouse models of obesity [...] Read more.
Interventions to decrease inflammation and improve metabolic function hold promise for the prevention of obesity-related diseases. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring compound that demonstrates antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Improvements in measures of metabolic health have been observed in mouse models of obesity and diabetes following MSM treatment. However, the effects of MSM on obesity-related diseases in humans have not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether MSM supplementation improves cardiometabolic health, and markers of inflammation and oxidative status. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was utilized with a total of 22 overweight or obese adults completing the study. Participants received either a placebo (white rice flour) or 3 g MSM daily for 16 weeks. Measurements occurred at baseline and after 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Outcome measures included fasting glucose, insulin, blood lipids, blood pressure, body composition, metabolic rate, and markers of inflammation and oxidative status. The primary finding of this work shows that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was elevated at 8 and 16 weeks of daily MSM consumption compared to baseline, (p = 0.008, p = 0.013). Our findings indicate that MSM supplementation may improve the cholesterol profile by resulting in higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Full article
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