Special Issue "Metabolic Changes in Response to Habitual Dietary Exposure and Physical Activity"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hans-Peter Kubis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Human Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, UK
Interests: obesity; metabolism; physical activity; exercise

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal of Nutrients invites you to submit manuscripts for a Special Edition on “Metabolic Changes in Response to Habitual Dietary Exposure and Physical Activity”. In view of the COVID-19 pandemic and potential dramatic effects on habitual diet and physical activity participation, we call for submissions which integrate the questions of altered physical activity and habitual diet selection and their effects on metabolism. With the overwhelming problems of obesity and sedentarism in mind, this Special Issue will focus on impacts of reduced physical activity and habitual malnutrition on metabolism but also invites articles improving metabolism by selected physical activity approaches in face of malnutrition. Articles are invited which report data from investigations, including observational and experimental studies, concerning the influence of habitual diet alterations and physical activity on all aspects of metabolism—from metabolomics and cell signaling to energy expenditure. This may include observation of food preferences in reduced physical activity situations, but also targeted physical activity interventions which monitor diet and metabolic alterations. We look forward to exciting submissions and thank all contributors for their support of this Special Issue.

Dr. Hans-Peter Kubis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Metabolism
  • Habitual diet
  • Obesity
  • Sedentarism
  • Food preference
  • Hedonic
  • Homeostasis

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Adherence to Dietary and Physical Activity Guidelines in Australian Undergraduate Biomedical Students and Associations with Body Composition and Metabolic Health: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3500; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103500 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 743
Abstract
There is a paucity of data on whether Australian university students are meeting specific nutrient guidelines, and the relationship between diet and physical activity patterns with body composition and metabolic health. In this study, biomedical students from The University of Queensland were recruited [...] Read more.
There is a paucity of data on whether Australian university students are meeting specific nutrient guidelines, and the relationship between diet and physical activity patterns with body composition and metabolic health. In this study, biomedical students from The University of Queensland were recruited (150 males and 211 females, 19–25 years), and nutritional intake (ASA24-Australia) and physical activity levels (Active Australia Survey) quantified. Body composition (height, waist circumference, body mass, BMI, and percentage body fat; BOD POD) and metabolic health (oral glucose tolerance test) were also measured. Median daily energy intake was 6760 kJ in females and 10,338 kJ in males, with more than 30% of total energy coming from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. Only 1 in 10 students met fruit or vegetable recommendations, with less than one third meeting recommendations for fibre, calcium, and potassium. Intakes of calcium and iron were particularly low among female students, with only 16% and 6% of students meeting the recommended dietary intake (RDI), respectively. The majority of males and almost half of all females exceeded the suggested dietary target (SDT) for sodium. Sufficient physical activity (≥150 min over ≥5 sessions per week) was met by more than 80% of students. Body composition and blood glucose concentrations were largely normal but an early sign of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR > 2.0), measured in a subset of students, was present in 21% of males and 17% of females. Modest reductions in blood glucose levels and percentage body fat were associated with increasing vigorous activity. Low intakes of fibre, calcium, and potassium could be corrected by increasing fruit, vegetable, and dairy intake, and, among females, health promotion messages focusing on iron-rich foods should be prioritised. While these nutrient deficiencies did not translate into immediate metabolic heath concerns, dietary behaviours can track into adulthood and have lasting effects on overall health. Full article
Article
Changes in Plasma Metabolome Profiles Following Oral Glucose Challenge among Adult Chinese
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1474; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051474 - 27 Apr 2021
Viewed by 733
Abstract
Little is known about changes in plasma metabolome profiles during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in Chinese. We aimed to characterize plasma metabolomic profiles at 0 and 2 h of OGTT and their changes in individuals of different glycemic statuses. A total [...] Read more.
Little is known about changes in plasma metabolome profiles during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in Chinese. We aimed to characterize plasma metabolomic profiles at 0 and 2 h of OGTT and their changes in individuals of different glycemic statuses. A total of 544 metabolites were detected at 0 and 2 h of OGTT by a nontarget strategy in subjects with normal glucose (n = 234), prediabetes (n = 281), and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) (n = 66). Regression model, mixed model, and partial least squares discrimination analysis were applied. Compared with subjects of normal glucose, T2D cases had significantly higher levels of glycerone at 0 h and 22 metabolites at 2 h of OGTT (false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, variable importance in projection (VIP) > 1). Seven of the twenty-two metabolites were also significantly higher in T2D than in prediabetes subjects at 2 h of OGTT (FDR < 0.05, VIP > 1). Two hours after glucose challenge, concentrations of 35 metabolites (normal: 18; prediabetes: 23; T2D: 13) significantly increased (FDR < 0.05, VIP > 1, fold change (FC) > 1.2), whereas those of 45 metabolites (normal: 36; prediabetes: 29; T2D: 18) significantly decreased (FDR < 0.05, VIP > 1, FC < 0.8). Distinct responses between cases and noncases were detected in metabolites including 4-imidazolone-5-acetate and 4-methylene-L-glutamine. More varieties of distinct metabolites across glycemic statuses were observed at 2 h of OGTT compared with fasting state. Whether the different patterns and responsiveness of certain metabolites in T2D reflect a poor resilience of specific metabolic pathways in regaining glucose homeostasis merits further study. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop