Special Issue "Diet Habits and Lifestyle in Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Metabolic-Associated Fatty Liver Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesco Angelico
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: atherosclerosis; risk factors; metabolic diseases; fatty liver disease; dyslipidaemia
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesco Baratta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical, Internal, Anaesthesiological and Cardiovascular Sciences, Sapienza University, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: liver diseases; dyslipidemia; risk factors; atherosclerosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Maria Del Ben
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical, Internal, Anaesthesiological and Cardiovascular Sciences, Sapienza University, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: obesity; clinical nutrition; metabolic syndrome; diabetes; liver diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a leading public health and clinical challenge worldwide. MetS is a clustering of medical conditions including abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, atherogenic dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance/diabetes. PCOS, OSAS and NAFLD are further clinical components of MetS. Recently, it has been proposed to rename NAFLD into MAFLD (metabolic associated fatty liver disease) to better characterize pathophysiology and its interpretation as a hepatic component of MetS. MetS is associated to lifestyle and obesity, and insulin resistance is the main underlining metabolic alteration together with low-grade inflammation and increased oxidative stress.

Healthy dietary and lifestyle choices can reverse MetS and many nutrients and different diets have been associated with favourable effects. 

Diets low in calories, saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, and salt have been proposed. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, fiber, antioxidants, small amount of alcohol and well-planned vegetarian diets have also been suggested. Mediterranean diet, with or without energy restriction, seems to be the best dietary pattern for the prevention and management of MetS.

In this Special Issue we aim to summarize the main evidence on the different dietary approaches for MetS and its many clinical components and comorbidities. Particular attention will be paid to dietary approaches for the new clinical entity named MAFLD.

Dr. Francesco Angelico
Dr. Francesco Baratta
Prof. Dr. Maria Del Ben
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Metabolic associated fatty liver disease
  • Mediterranean diet
  • Insulin resistance
  • Oxidative stress
  • Risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Consumption of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated with Improved Cardiometabolic Outcomes in Four African-Origin Populations Spanning the Epidemiologic Transition
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2442; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072442 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 849
Abstract
Long-chain omega-3 PUFAs, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are of increasing interest because of their favorable effect on cardiometabolic risk. This study explores the association between omega 6 and 3 fatty acids intake and cardiometabolic risk in four African-origin populations [...] Read more.
Long-chain omega-3 PUFAs, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are of increasing interest because of their favorable effect on cardiometabolic risk. This study explores the association between omega 6 and 3 fatty acids intake and cardiometabolic risk in four African-origin populations spanning the epidemiological transition. Data are obtained from a cohort of 2500 adults aged 25–45 enrolled in the Modeling the Epidemiologic Transition Study (METS), from the US, Ghana, Jamaica, and the Seychelles. Dietary intake was measured using two 24 h recalls from the Nutrient Data System for Research (NDSR). The prevalence of cardiometabolic risk was analyzed by comparing the lowest and highest quartile of omega-3 (EPA+ DHA) consumption and by comparing participants who consumed a ratio of arachidonic acid (AA)/EPA + DHA 4:1 and >4:1. Data were analyzed using multiple variable logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, activity, calorie intake, alcohol intake, and smoking status. The lowest quartile of EPA + DHA intake is associated with cardiometabolic risk 2.16 (1.45, 3.2), inflammation 1.59 (1.17, 2.16), and obesity 2.06 (1.50, 2.82). Additionally, consuming an AA/EPA + DHA ratio of >4:1 is also associated with cardiometabolic risk 1.80 (1.24, 2.60), inflammation 1.47 (1.06, 2.03), and obesity 1.72 (1.25, 2.39). Our findings corroborate previous research supporting a beneficial role for monounsaturated fatty acids in reducing cardiometabolic risk. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Dietary approach to metabolic syndrome and NAFLD in atrial fibrillation
Authors: Daniele Pastori‬
Affiliation: Sapienza University

Title: Nutritional status in overweight/obesity and sarcopenia in post metabolic cirrhosis
Authors: Manuela Merli
Affiliation: Sapienza University

Title: Effects of dark chocolate in metabolic associated fatty liver disease
Authors: Lorenzo Loffredo
Affiliation: Sapienza University

Title: Fructose consumption, the metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease
Authors: Domenico Ferro
Affiliation: Sapienza University

Title: Effects of chetogenic diet on metabolic syndrome and body fat composition in obese patients
Authors: Ilaria Ernesti
Affiliation: Sapienza University

Title: Mediterranean diet, the metabolic sindrome and metabolic associated fatty liver disease
Authors: Francesco Baratta
Affiliation: Sapienza University

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