Special Issue "Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jay R. Hoffman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The department of Physical Therapy, Ariel University, Ariel 4076405, Israel
Interests: ergogenic aids; human performance; dietary intervention; supplement; sport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The past 30 years have seen unbelievable growth in the dietary supplement industry. Since the 1990s, dietary supplement sales have increased by more than 80% to nearly $16 billion dollars annually. Growth is not slowing down, and the market for dietary supplements continues to expand. For many, the rationale for using dietary supplements is for the purpose of enhancing muscle growth, improving strength, increasing endurance capacity, or enhancing recovery. This ever-changing market requires continuous oversight that informs athletes, coaches, sport nutritionists, and sport scientists on cutting-edge information about the efficacy, safety, and legality of various dietary supplements. Please consider submitting your latest research examining dietary supplements in competitive athletes. Review papers providing unique perspectives from sport scientists with extensive work in this area are also encouraged. Considering that 2021 is an Olympic year, focus on emerging dietary supplements and their ergogenic effects will provide an important scientific contribution to the sport science community.

Prof. Dr. Jay R. Hoffman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ergogenic aids
  • human performance
  • dietary intervention
  • supplement
  • sport

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
The Effects of 6 Weeks of Tribulus terrestris L. Supplementation on Body Composition, Hormonal Response, Perceived Exertion, and CrossFit® Performance: A Randomized, Single-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3969; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13113969 - 07 Nov 2021
Viewed by 881
Abstract
Tribulus terrestris L. (TT) supplementation have been shown to enhance sports performance in many but not all studies. Moreover, data regarding the potential impact of TT supplementation on CrossFit® endurance is limited. This study aimed to determine whether TT supplementation [...] Read more.
Tribulus terrestris L. (TT) supplementation have been shown to enhance sports performance in many but not all studies. Moreover, data regarding the potential impact of TT supplementation on CrossFit® endurance is limited. This study aimed to determine whether TT supplementation improve body composition, hormonal response, and performance among CrossFit® athletes. In a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 30 healthy CrossFit®-trained males were randomly allocated to receive either 770 mg of TT supplementation or a placebo daily for 6 weeks. Body mass, fat mass, fat composition, testosterone and cortisol levels, and CrossFit® performance (5 common Workouts of the Day: back squat, bench press, dead lift, Grace, and CrossFit® Total) were assessed before and after intervention. There were no significant group x time interactions for the outcomes of the study except for testosterone levels and bench press performance (p < 0.05). TT supplementation did not impact enhance performance or body composition in CrossFit® male athletes. However, TT supplementation may act as a testosterone booster helping the recovery after physical loads and mitigating fatigue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes)
Article
The Effects of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on the Cardiorespiratory System and Gross Efficiency during Exercise under Hypoxia in Male Cyclists: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3556; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103556 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 796
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of six days of tri-sodium phosphate (SP) supplementation on the cardiorespiratory system and gross efficiency (GE) during exercise under hypoxia in cyclists. Twenty trained male cyclists received SP (50 mg·kg−1 of [...] Read more.
The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of six days of tri-sodium phosphate (SP) supplementation on the cardiorespiratory system and gross efficiency (GE) during exercise under hypoxia in cyclists. Twenty trained male cyclists received SP (50 mg·kg−1 of fat-free mass/day) or placebo for six days in a randomized, cross-over study, with a three-week washout period between supplementation phases. Before and after each supplementation phase, the subjects performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion under normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 16%, ~2500 m). It was observed that short-term SP supplementation led to a decrease in heart rate, an increase in stroke volume, and an improvement in oxygen pulse (VO2/HR) during low and moderate-intensity exercise under hypoxia. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the serum inorganic phosphate level by 8.7% (p < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in serum calcium levels. GE at a given workload did not change significantly after SP supplementation. These results indicated that SP promotes improvements in the efficiency of the cardiorespiratory system during exercise in a hypoxic environment. Thus, SP supplementation may be beneficial for endurance exercise in hypoxia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Effects of Caffeine on Jumping Performance and Maximal Strength in Female Collegiate Athletes
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2496; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082496 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 770
Abstract
Caffeine is often used in a variety of forms to enhance athletic performance; however, research regarding caffeine’s effects on strength and power in female athletes is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the acute effects of caffeine anhydrous (6 [...] Read more.
Caffeine is often used in a variety of forms to enhance athletic performance; however, research regarding caffeine’s effects on strength and power in female athletes is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the acute effects of caffeine anhydrous (6 mg/kg of body mass) on jumping performance and maximal strength in female collegiate athletes. Eleven athletes (19.7 ± 0.9 yrs; 166.4 ± 10.2 cm, 67.7 ± 9.4 kg) performed two testing sessions separated by one week, and randomly received caffeine or placebo using a double-blind approach. Heart rate, blood pressure, and tympanic temperature were recorded before athletes received each condition, following 60 min of quiet sitting, and directly after performance testing. Athletes were assessed on unweighted and weighted squat jump height (SJH0, SJH20) and countermovement jump height (CMJH0, CMJH20), isometric mid-thigh pull peak force (IPF), and rate of force development from 0–200 ms (RFD200). Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly greater following caffeine administration compared to a placebo (p = 0.017). There were small, significant differences in SJH0 (p = 0.035, g = 0.35), SJH20 (p = 0.002, g = 0.49), CMJH0 (p = 0.015, g = 0.19), and CMJH20 (p < 0.001, g = 0.37) in favor of caffeine over placebo. However, there was no significant difference in IPF (p = 0.369, g = 0.12) and RFD200 (p = 0.235, g = 0.32) between conditions. Therefore, caffeine appears to enhance jumping performance, but not maximal strength in female collegiate athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Rapid Weight Loss Habits before a Competition in Sambo Athletes
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1063; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13041063 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1048
Abstract
Background: Like other combat sports, sambo has competition rules that divide athletes into categories based on gender, age and weight. Athletes in combat sports often resort to rapid weight loss (RWL) methods to be more competitive in lower weight categories and gain an [...] Read more.
Background: Like other combat sports, sambo has competition rules that divide athletes into categories based on gender, age and weight. Athletes in combat sports often resort to rapid weight loss (RWL) methods to be more competitive in lower weight categories and gain an advantage against lighter, smaller and weaker competitors. The aim of this study was to examine the methodology implemented by two different sambo age categories, junior and senior athletes, in order to attain RWL. Methods: The sample consisted of 103 male sambo elite athletes (seniors/juniors: age 28.5 ± 4.3/18.9 ± 0.8; height (m): 1.7 ± 0.1/1.8 ± 0.1; weight (kg): 76.3 ± 17.8/74.4 ± 16.3; BMI (kg/m2): 25.0 ± 3.8/23.7 ± 3.9) who completed a survey on RWL. Results: Athletes reported losing a mean of 5 kg starting approximately 12 days before a competition. The most common methodology reported by senior and junior sambo athletes was gradually increasing dieting, followed by sauna and plastic suit training. Less common methods adopted were laxatives, diuretics, the use of diet pills and vomiting. There were significant group differences for sauna and diet pill ingestion. Coaches and parents are influential people in the lives of athletes concerning the weight loss strategy to be adopted. Conclusions: This study’s results unequivocally confirm the prevalent practice of RWL in both senior and junior sambo athletes. Although athletes prevalently chose “less harmful” methods, there is a need to inform parents and coaches of the risks and benefits of RWL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Manipulation of Dietary Intake on Changes in Circulating Testosterone Concentrations
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3375; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103375 - 25 Sep 2021
Viewed by 1753
Abstract
Elevations in the circulating concentration of androgens are thought to have a positive effect on the anabolic processes leading to improved athletic performance. Anabolic-androgenic steroids have often been used by competitive athletes to augment this effect. Although there has been concerted effort on [...] Read more.
Elevations in the circulating concentration of androgens are thought to have a positive effect on the anabolic processes leading to improved athletic performance. Anabolic-androgenic steroids have often been used by competitive athletes to augment this effect. Although there has been concerted effort on examining how manipulating training variables (e.g., intensity and volume of training) can influence the androgen response to exercise, there has been much less effort directed at understanding how changes in both macronutrient and micronutrient intake can impact the androgen response. Thus, the focus of this review is to examine the effect that manipulating energy and nutrient intake has on circulating concentrations of testosterone and what the potential mechanism is governing these changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Intervention in Competitive Athletes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop