Special Issue "Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity and Cancer"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Angela Kong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60608, USA
Dr. Yumie Takata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oregon State University, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Nutrition and Epidemiology programs, Corvallis OR 97331, USA
Interests: human nutrition; cancer; epidemiology; dairy products; selenium; systematic review and meta-analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Variations in cancer risk and obesity status across populations can be attributed to both heritable factors, as well as modifiable factors, such as diet. Evidence based on observational and experimental studies suggest that diet, whether in food group form, as a single nutrient, or based on diet quality, helps to explain some of the differences observed in patterns of cancer risk and obesity status worldwide.  However, if we are to move towards making dietary recommendations that will have a public health impact, we will need to strengthen our evidence base and continue to enhance our understanding on the role of diet (in all forms) on these health outcomes.

In this Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity, and Cancer”, we welcome manuscript submissions of original research in humans (epidemiological or experimental) or reviews of the scientific literature on this topic.

Dr. Angela Kong
Dr. Yumie Takata
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diet
  • obesity
  • food quality
  • nutritive value
  • humans
  • cancer
  • body weight

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Dairy Product Consumption and Prostate Cancer Risk in the United States
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1615; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11071615 - 16 Jul 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3284
Abstract
An ongoing controversy exists regarding the effect of dairy products on prostate cancer risk in observational studies. We prospectively investigated the associations between dairy product consumption and prostate cancer risk among men in the United States. After calculating pre-diagnostic intake of individual or [...] Read more.
An ongoing controversy exists regarding the effect of dairy products on prostate cancer risk in observational studies. We prospectively investigated the associations between dairy product consumption and prostate cancer risk among men in the United States. After calculating pre-diagnostic intake of individual or subgroups of dairy products using a validated food frequency questionnaire, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pathologically-verified cases of incident prostate cancer among men, overall, or stratified by severity. Among 49,472 men, 4134 were diagnosed with prostate cancer during an average follow-up period of 11.2 years. The median total dairy intake was 101 g/1000 kcal. Consumption of total, individual, or subgroups of dairy products was not statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer risk overall (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.96–1.15 comparing the highest with lowest quartile) or stratified by severity, except for regular-fat dairy product intake with late-stage prostate cancer risk (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.04–1.82 comparing the highest with lowest quartile) and 2%-fat milk intake with advanced prostate cancer risk (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02–1.28 comparing the higher than median intake with no intake group). Our findings do not support the previously reported harmful impact of dairy consumption on overall prostate cancer risk among men in the United States. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity and Cancer)
Article
Comparative Effectiveness Trial of an Obesity Prevention Intervention in EFNEP and SNAP-ED: Primary Outcomes
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1012; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11051012 - 05 May 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1811
Abstract
There is a need to disseminate evidence-based childhood obesity prevention interventions on a broader scale to reduce obesity-related disparities among underserved children. The purpose of this study was to test the comparative effectiveness of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention, Hip-Hop to Health (HH), [...] Read more.
There is a need to disseminate evidence-based childhood obesity prevention interventions on a broader scale to reduce obesity-related disparities among underserved children. The purpose of this study was to test the comparative effectiveness of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention, Hip-Hop to Health (HH), delivered through Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) versus the standard curriculum delivered by the programs (Standard Nutrition Education (NE)). A nonequivalent control group design was delivered to compare the effectiveness of HH to NE on weight gain prevention and health behavior outcomes at EFNEP and SNAP-Ed sites. One hundred and fifty-three caregiver–child dyads (n = 103 in the HH group; n = 50 in the NE group) participated in the study. HH is an evidence-based dietary and physical activity intervention for low-income preschool children. The NE curriculum provided lessons for children that are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Data were collected on demographics, anthropometrics, and behavioral variables for parent–child dyads at baseline and postintervention. Mixed model methods with random effects for site and participant were utilized. No differences in child or caregiver diet, physical activity, or screen time by group were found. No between-group differences in child BMI z-score were found; however, caregivers in the HH group lost significantly more weight than those in the NE group. Results from this trial can inform future dissemination efforts of evidenced-based programs for underserved families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity and Cancer)
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Article
Associations between Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010, Body Composition, Osteoarthritis Severity, and Interleukin-6 in Older Overweight and Obese African American Females with Self-Reported Osteoarthritis
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 26; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11010026 - 22 Dec 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1755
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of immobility in the United States and is associated with older age, inflammation, and obesity. Prudent dietary patterns have been associated with disease prevention, yet little evidence exists describing diet quality (DQ) in older overweight or obese [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of immobility in the United States and is associated with older age, inflammation, and obesity. Prudent dietary patterns have been associated with disease prevention, yet little evidence exists describing diet quality (DQ) in older overweight or obese African American (AA) adults with OA and its relation to body composition. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a dataset containing alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), body composition, OA severity, and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) data from 126 AA females (aged 60–87 years) with OA to examine the relationships between these variables. Our sample had poor DQ and reported having higher OA severity as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Interleukin-6 was negatively correlated with AHEI-2010, and AHEI-2010 and the WOMAC physical function subcategory (WOMACpf) were significant predictors of IL-6 (odds ratio (OR): 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92–0.99 and 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.07, respectively, p < 0.05) but not body composition. In conclusion, AHEI-2010 and WOMACpf were significant predictors of inflammation (IL-6) and AHEI-2010 accounted for ~16% of the variation of IL-6 (inflammation) in this sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity and Cancer)
Article
Association between the Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk for Cancer Recurrence and Mortality among Patients with Breast Cancer
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1095; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu10081095 - 15 Aug 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2231
Abstract
The dietary inflammatory index (DII) has been associated with breast cancer incidence and survival. However, the association between DII and cancer recurrence and mortality among patients with breast cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether DII was [...] Read more.
The dietary inflammatory index (DII) has been associated with breast cancer incidence and survival. However, the association between DII and cancer recurrence and mortality among patients with breast cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether DII was positively associated with risk for cancer recurrence and overall mortality among patients with breast cancer. Among 511 women (51.9 ± 10.7 years; stage 0–3) who underwent breast cancer surgery, 88 had cancer recurrence, and 44 died during follow–up until 213 months (average disease free survival of 84.3 ± 42.4 months and overall survival of 69.3 ± 38.9 months). The DII assessed after surgery (5.4 ± 5.2 months after diagnosis) was significantly higher in patients with recurrence than those without recurrence, and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that it was positively associated with the risk for cancer recurrence (hazard ratio (HR) 2.347, confidence interval (CI) 1.17–4.71) and overall mortality (HR 3.049, CI 1.08–8.83) after adjusting for confounding factors. Disease-free survival and overall survival rates were significantly lower in patients with higher DII scores. In addition, the DII was positively associated with the risk for cancer recurrence according to prognostic factors, such as age (<50 years), premenopausal status, body mass index (≥25 kg/m2), HR+, tumor size (>2 cm), and presence of lymph node metastasis. The present study showed that anti-inflammatory diets may decrease the risk of cancer recurrence and overall mortality in patients with breast cancer, particularly those with prognostic factors, such as younger age, premenopausal status, obesity, HR+ breast cancer, tumor size >2 cm, and presence of lymph node metastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, Obesity and Cancer)
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