Special Issue "Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefanos Tyrovolas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Parc Sanitari Sant Juan de Deu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBRESAM, University of Barcelona, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: nutrition; successful and healthy aging; frailty; chronic diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global population is aging at an unprecedented speed. Frailty and sarcopenia are two common conditions among the older adults. Frailty is characterized by several deficits in multiple health related domains while sarcopenia reflects declines in muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance. Both conditions are related with functional decline in various physiological systems and lower quality of life.

While there is considerable interest among scientists regarding the effect of nutrition on frailty and sarcopenia epidemiology, there is still scant information on various factors as well as among temporal and regional patterns. Information among low- and middle- income older populations is limited. Recent studies have shown that specific nutritional components and dietary habits could have a beneficial effect on frailty syndrome as well as on sarcopenia and muscle loss. Given the importance of this issue, the journal Nutrients is planning a Special Issue on “Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention” with the aim of providing a source for accurate and up-to-date scientific information on this topic.

We invite you and your co-workers to consider the submission of your original research findings or a review article on the topic. Manuscripts should focus on the impact of specific food components, dietary patterns, energy intake, macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients, alcohol intake, food insecurity, innovative foods, as well as malnourishment and appetite to frailty and sarcopenia across older populations. We also welcome manuscripts that focus on community nutrition and intervention studies (i.e., protein diet, diet quality) that are related to frailty and sarcopenia.

Dr. Stefanos Tyrovolas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Frailty
  • Sarcopenia
  • Nutrition
  • Aging

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Association between Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index and The Presence of Sarcopenia in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3729; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13113729 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 923
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) and the prevalence of sarcopenia in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Having both low handgrip strength (<28 kg for men and <18 kg for [...] Read more.
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) and the prevalence of sarcopenia in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Having both low handgrip strength (<28 kg for men and <18 kg for women) and low skeletal muscle mass index (<7.0 kg/m2 for men and <5.7 kg/m2 for women) was diagnosed as sarcopenia. GNRI was estimated by the formula as below: GNRI = (1.489 × serum albumin level [g/L]) + (41.7 × [current body weight (kg)/ideal body weight (kg)]). Participants were dichotomized on the basis of their GNRI scores (GNRI < 98, low; or GNRI ≥ 98, high). Among 526 people (301 men and 225 women) with T2DM, the proportions of participants with sarcopenia and low GNRI were 12.7% (n = 67/526) and 5.1% (n = 27/526), respectively. The proportion of sarcopenia in participants with low-GNRI was higher than that with high GNRI (44.4% [n = 12/27] vs. 11.0% [n = 55/499], p < 0.001). The GNRI showed positive correlations with handgrip strength (r = 0.232, p < 0.001) and skeletal muscle mass index (r = 0.514, p < 0.001). Moreover, low GNRI was related to the prevalence of sarcopenia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.88 [95% confidence interval: 1.88–12.7], p = 0.001). The GNRI, as a continuous variable, was also related to the prevalence of sarcopenia (adjusted odds ratio, 0.89 [95% confidence interval: 0.86–0.93], p < 0.001). The present study revealed that low GNRI was related to the prevalence of sarcopenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effect of Improvement in Sarcopenia on Functional and Discharge Outcomes in Stroke Rehabilitation Patients
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2192; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072192 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1218
Abstract
This cross-sectional study investigated the proportion of patients’ recovery from sarcopenia status and the relationship between improvement in sarcopenia (IS) and function and discharge outcome in hospitalized patients with stroke. This study included patients with stroke, aged 65 years or more, with a [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study investigated the proportion of patients’ recovery from sarcopenia status and the relationship between improvement in sarcopenia (IS) and function and discharge outcome in hospitalized patients with stroke. This study included patients with stroke, aged 65 years or more, with a diagnosis of sarcopenia, who were admitted to a convalescent rehabilitation ward. Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia 2019 criteria. Patients were divided according to the presence or absence of sarcopenia at discharge: IS group and non-improvement in sarcopenia (NIS) group. Among the 227 participants (mean age: 80.5 years; 125 females), 30% (69/227) of the patients were in the IS group, while 70% (158/227) were in the NIS group. The IS group showed a higher Functional Independence Measure (FIM) than the NIS group (median 112 vs. 101, p = 0.003). The results demonstrated that IS was independently associated with higher FIM (partial regression coefficient, 5.378; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.709–10.047). The IS group had higher odds of home discharge than the NIS group (odds ratio, 2.560; 95% CI, 0.912–7.170). In conclusion, recovery from sarcopenia may be associated with better function in patients with stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Association between Food Insecurity and Sarcopenia among Adults Aged ≥65 Years in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1879; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13061879 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Limited literature has investigated the association between food insecurity and sarcopenia in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between food insecurity and sarcopenia among adults aged ≥65 years in six LMICs. Community-based [...] Read more.
Limited literature has investigated the association between food insecurity and sarcopenia in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between food insecurity and sarcopenia among adults aged ≥65 years in six LMICs. Community-based cross-sectional data of the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of low skeletal muscle mass based on indirect population formula, and either slow gait or low handgrip strength. In the past, 12-month food insecurity was assessed with two questions on frequency of eating less and hunger due to lack of food. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. The final sample consisted of 14,585 individuals aged ≥65 years (mean (SD) age 72.6 (11.5) years; 55.0% females). The prevalence of sarcopenia among those with no food insecurity was 13.0% but this increased to 24.4% among those with severe food insecurity. After adjustment for potential confounders, compared to no food insecurity, severe food insecurity was associated with 2.05 (95%CI = 1.12–3.73) times higher odds for sarcopenia. In this large representative sample of older adults from multiple LMICs, it was found that severe food insecurity is associated with higher odds for sarcopenia. Addressing food insecurity in such settings may be an effective strategy to curb the high prevalence of sarcopenia in LMICs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Sarcopenic Dysphagia: A Narrative Review from Diagnosis to Intervention
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4043; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114043 - 12 Nov 2021
Viewed by 670
Abstract
Sarcopenia, defined as a decline in muscle mass and function related to aging, affects both limb and swallowing-related muscles. Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by decreased swallowing function; therefore, early detection of subclinical dysphagia and subsequent intervention appear to be crucial in the elderly. [...] Read more.
Sarcopenia, defined as a decline in muscle mass and function related to aging, affects both limb and swallowing-related muscles. Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by decreased swallowing function; therefore, early detection of subclinical dysphagia and subsequent intervention appear to be crucial in the elderly. Numerous tools have been employed to measure the function, strength, and mass of swallowing-related muscles in sarcopenic elderly. The swallowing function can be evaluated by questionnaires like Eating Assessment Tool, Functional Oral Intake Scale, and Food Intake Level Scale, and tests such as the modified water swallowing test and videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Surface electromyography and high-resolution manometry can be applied for quantifying swallowing-related muscle strength. Modalities such as ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are capable of estimating the swallowing muscle mass. In patients with sarcopenic dysphagia, a thorough assessment should be given followed by an integrated intervention combining swallowing muscle strengthening, nutrition support, food texture modification, physical, and occupational therapies. This article aimed to comprehensively summarize the diagnostic criteria/tools as well as their associations/performance in sarcopenic dysphagia. The intervention strategy will also be narrated in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Frailty and Sarcopenia Prevention)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop