Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 1st International Electronic Conference on Nutrients - Nutritional and Microbiota Effects on Chronic Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maria Luz Fernandez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Interests: lipoprotein metabolism; functional foods; eggs; metabolic syndrome; diabetes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Maria Dolores del Castillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Bioscience Group, Department of Bioactivity and Food Analysis, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Autonoma University of Madrid (UAM), Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; diet; dietary fiber; food processing and health; food quality and safety; functional foods; human nutrition and health; novel ingredients and foods; food waste recovery into healthy ingredients
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue comprises selected papers from the Proceedings of the 1st International Electronic Conference—Nutritional and Microbiota Effects on Chronic Disease. The conference is set to be held from 2 to 15 November 2020 on sciforum.net, an online platform for hosting scholarly e-conferences and discussion groups. Selected extended papers from this e-conference can be submitted to the conference Special Issue with a 20% discount on the Article Processing Charge.

The target topics for this Special Issue are the nutritional and microbiota effects on chronic disease. Research articles addressing microbiota and nutrition choices resulting in poor metabolic outcomes, as well as appropriate nutrient and lifestyle interventions, such as exercise, and their positive effects on host metabolism, will be accepted. The specific interactions of microbiota on inflammation, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and fatty liver disease are also of interest for this Special Issue. Articles targeting the gut–brain axis and chronic disease, including effects of nutrients, phytochemicals and food addiction on metabolic outcomes, will also be accepted.

Prof. Dr. Maria Luz Fernandez
Dr. Maria Dolores del Castillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbiota
  • gut-brain axis
  • nutrition choices and metabolic outcomes
  • chronic disease
  • insulin resistance
  • obesity
  • dyslipidemia
  • fatty liver disease
  • inflammation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Gastrointestinal Digestion Model Assessment of Peptide Diversity and Microbial Fermentation Products of Collagen Hydrolysates
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2720; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082720 - 07 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 785
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is associated with metabolic diseases and gut microbiome dysbiosis. OA patients often take supplements of collagen hydrolysates (CHs) with a high peptide content. Following digestion, some peptides escape absorption to induce prebiotic effects via their [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is associated with metabolic diseases and gut microbiome dysbiosis. OA patients often take supplements of collagen hydrolysates (CHs) with a high peptide content. Following digestion, some peptides escape absorption to induce prebiotic effects via their colonic fermentation to generate short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) and colonic gases (NH4 and H2S). The capacity of CHs to generate microbial metabolites is unknown. Proteomic analysis of two CHs (CH-GL and CH-OPT) demonstrated different native peptide profiles with increased peptide diversity after in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestion. Subsequent 24 h fermentation of the CH digests in a dynamic gastrointestinal (GI) digestion model containing human fecal matter showed that CH-OPT increased (p < 0.05) H2S, SCFAs (propionic, butyric and valeric acids), BCFAs, and decreased NH4 in the ascending colon reactor with no major changes seen with CH-GL. No major effects were observed in the transverse and descending vessels for either CH. These findings signify that CHs can induce prebiotic effects in the ascending colon that are CH dependent. More studies are needed to determine the physiological significance of CH-derived colonic metabolites, in view of emerging evidence connecting the gut to OA and metabolic diseases. Full article
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Article
Gut Microbiota Bacterial Species Associated with Mediterranean Diet-Related Food Groups in a Northern Spanish Population
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 636; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020636 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1141
Abstract
The MD (Mediterranean diet) is recognized as one of the healthiest diets worldwide and is associated with the prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Dietary habits are considered one of the strongest modulators of gut microbiota, which seem to play a significant role [...] Read more.
The MD (Mediterranean diet) is recognized as one of the healthiest diets worldwide and is associated with the prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Dietary habits are considered one of the strongest modulators of gut microbiota, which seem to play a significant role in health status of the host. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate interactive associations between gut microbiota composition and habitual dietary intake in 360 Spanish adults from the Obekit cohort (normal weight, overweight, and obese participants). Dietary intake and adherence to the MD tests were administered and fecal samples were collected from each participant. Fecal 16S rRNA (ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid) gene sequencing was performed and checked against the dietary habits. MetagenomeSeq was the statistical tool applied to analyze data at the species taxonomic level. Results from this study identified several beneficial bacteria that were more abundant in the individuals with higher adherence to the MD. Bifidobacterium animalis was the species with the strongest association with the MD. Some SCFA (Short Chain Fatty Acids) -producing bacteria were also associated with MD. In conclusion, this study showed that MD, fiber, legumes, vegetable, fruit, and nut intake are associated with an increase in butyrate-producing taxa such as Roseburia faecis, Ruminococcus bromii, and Oscillospira (Flavonifractor) plautii. Full article
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