Special Issue "Nutrition, Dietary Supplements and Ergogenic Aids in the Treatment of Sarcopenia and Associated Conditions"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Darren Candow
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada
Interests: aging; dietary supplements; exercise; musculoskeletal; health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Scott Forbes
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education Studies, Faculty of Education, Brandon University, Brandon, MB R7A 6A9, Canada
Interests: supplements; ergogenic aid; exercise; performance; sports
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sarcopenia generally refers to age-related decrease in muscle quantity, strength, and physical performance. Sarcopenia is associated with other age-related conditions such as osteoporosis, obesity, type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cachexia, and physical frailty. With the expected increase in the global population, lifestyle interventions involving nutrition will continue to be important in the pursuit of healthy and successful aging. This Special Issue will highlight research involving the interactions between nutrition, dietary supplements, and ergogenic aids on sarcopenia and associated age-related conditions. Original research, reviews and meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials involving nutritional interventions on cellular pathways involving aging physiology are also welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Darren Candow
Guest Editor

Dr. Scott Forbes
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • disease
  • health
  • diet
  • nutrition
  • supplements
  • body composition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Daily Leucine Intake Is Positively Associated with Lower Limb Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength in the Elderly
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3536; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103536 - 09 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Higher daily protein intake, with an emphasis on leucine content, is thought to mitigate age-related anabolic resistance, potentially counteracting age-related morphological and functional declines. The present study investigated potential associations between total daily leucine intake and dependent variables, including quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area [...] Read more.
Higher daily protein intake, with an emphasis on leucine content, is thought to mitigate age-related anabolic resistance, potentially counteracting age-related morphological and functional declines. The present study investigated potential associations between total daily leucine intake and dependent variables, including quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and maximum dynamic muscle strength (1-RM) in a cohort of healthy free-living older individuals of both sexes (n = 67; 34/33 men/women). Participants performed three 24 h dietary recalls and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging exam followed by 1-RM tests. Our results demonstrate moderate associations between total daily leucine and both quadriceps CSA (r = 0.42; p = 0.004) and 1-RM (r = 0.45; p = 0.001). Furthermore, our exploratory biphasic linear regression analyses, adjusted for sex, age, and protein intake relative to body weight, revealed a plateau for daily leucine intake and muscle mass and muscle strength (~7.6–8.0 g·day−1) in older adults. In conclusion, we demonstrated that total daily leucine intake is associated with muscle mass and strength in healthy older individuals and this association remains after controlling for multiple factors, including overall protein intake. Furthermore, our breakpoint analysis revealed non-linearities and a potential threshold for habitual leucine intake, which may help guide future research on the effects of chronic leucine intake in age-related muscle loss. Full article
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Review

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Review
Efficacy of Creatine Supplementation Combined with Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Females: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3757; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13113757 - 24 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1372
Abstract
Sarcopenia refers to the age-related loss of muscle strength and muscle mass, which is associated with a reduced quality of life, particularly in older females. Resistance training (RT) is well established to be an effective intervention to counter indices of sarcopenia. Accumulating research [...] Read more.
Sarcopenia refers to the age-related loss of muscle strength and muscle mass, which is associated with a reduced quality of life, particularly in older females. Resistance training (RT) is well established to be an effective intervention to counter indices of sarcopenia. Accumulating research indicates that the addition of creatine supplementation (Cr) to RT augments gains in muscle strength and muscle mass, compared to RT alone. However, some evidence indicates that sex differences may alter the effectiveness of Cr. Therefore, we systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of Cr + RT on measures of upper- and lower-body strength and muscle mass in older females. A systematic literature search was performed in nine electronic databases. Ten RCTs (N = 211 participants) were included the review. Overall, Cr significantly increased measures of upper-body strength (7 studies, n = 142, p = 0.04), with no effect on lower-body strength or measures of muscle mass. Sub-analyses revealed that both upper-body (4 studies, n = 97, p = 0.05) and lower-body strength (4 studies, n = 100, p = 0.03) were increased by Cr, compared to placebo in studies ≥ 24 weeks in duration. In conclusion, older females supplementing with Cr experience significant gains in muscle strength, especially when RT lasts for at least 24 weeks in duration. However, given the level of evidence, future high-quality studies are needed to confirm these findings. Full article
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