Special Issue "Exploring the Reciprocal Relationships Between Sweeteners and Energy Balance"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kimber L. Stanhope
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Nutrition, University California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Interests: sugar; diet; non-nutritive sweeteners; sucrose; high-fructose corn syrup; aspartame; fructose; sucralose; saccharine; energy intake; energy balance; de novo lipogenesis; cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; metabolic syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue devoted to Sweeteners and Energy Balance will address both the roles of sweeteners in the regulation of energy balance and the role of energy balance in mediating the effects of sweeteners. Controversy exists concerning the roles of both added sugars and non-nutritive sweeteners in the obesity crisis, and experts will review the current state of the evidence on the impact of both added sugars and non-nutritive sweeteners on pathways involving adipose deposition and food intake regulation. Controversy also exits regarding whether the health effects of added sugar are independent of its potential effects on energy balance, and the evidence addressing this issue will also be reviewed.

Prof. Dr. Kimber L. Stanhope
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fructose
  • added sugar
  • sugar-sweetened beverage
  • sucrose
  • high-fructose corn syrup
  • non-nutritive sweetener
  • energy balance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Low Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets: What We Don’t Know and Why We Should Know It
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2749; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11112749 - 12 Nov 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 6726
Abstract
In the 1940s, the diet-heart hypothesis proposed that high dietary saturated fat and cholesterol intake promoted coronary heart disease in “at-risk” individuals. This hypothesis prompted federal recommendations for a low-fat diet for “high risk” patients and as a preventive health measure for everyone [...] Read more.
In the 1940s, the diet-heart hypothesis proposed that high dietary saturated fat and cholesterol intake promoted coronary heart disease in “at-risk” individuals. This hypothesis prompted federal recommendations for a low-fat diet for “high risk” patients and as a preventive health measure for everyone except infants. The low carbohydrate diet, first used to treat type 1 diabetes, became a popular obesity therapy with the Atkins diet in the 1970s. Its predicted effectiveness was based largely on the hypothesis that insulin is the causa prima of weight gain and regain via hyperphagia and hypometabolism during and after weight reduction, and therefore reduced carbohydrate intake would promote and sustain weight loss. Based on literature reviews, there are insufficient randomized controlled inpatient studies examining the physiological significance of the mechanisms proposed to support one over the other. Outpatient studies can be confounded by poor diet compliance such that the quality and quantity of the energy intake cannot be ascertained. Many studies also fail to separate macronutrient quantity from quality. Overall, there is no conclusive evidence that the degree of weight loss or the duration of reduced weight maintenance are significantly affected by dietary macronutrient quantity beyond effects attributable to caloric intake. Further work is needed. Full article
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Review
Low Calorie Sweeteners Differ in Their Physiological Effects in Humans
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2717; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11112717 - 09 Nov 2019
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3325
Abstract
Low calorie sweeteners (LCS) are prevalent in the food supply for their primary functional property of providing sweetness with little or no energy. Though tested for safety individually, there has been extremely limited work on the efficacy of each LCS. It is commonly [...] Read more.
Low calorie sweeteners (LCS) are prevalent in the food supply for their primary functional property of providing sweetness with little or no energy. Though tested for safety individually, there has been extremely limited work on the efficacy of each LCS. It is commonly assumed all LCS act similarly in their behavioral and physiological effects. However, each LCS has its own chemical structure that influences its metabolism, making each LCS unique in its potential effects on body weight, energy intake, and appetite. LCS may have different behavioral and physiological effects mediated at the sweet taste receptor, in brain activation, with gut hormones, at the microbiota and on appetitive responses. Further elucidation of the unique effects of the different commercially available LCS may hold important implications for recommendations about their use for different health outcomes. Full article
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