Special Issue "Selected Papers from APNNO Biennial Conference 2018"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hisanori Kato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 1138657, Japan
Interests: protein and amino acid nutrition; multi-omics analysis; functional foods; genome-wide association study; epigenetic alteration by maternal nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue contains a selection of papers presented at the Asia Pacific Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics Organisation (APNNO) Biennial Conference in Tokyo in December 2018. The theme of APNNO 2018 is “Nutri-genomics/genetics for Precision Health in Multicultural Aging Populations—Profiling Differences, Discovering Possibilities”. This Special Issue will highlight the following strategic subjects:

  • Nutrient-gene interaction
  • Epigenetic regulation by nutrients
  • Role of gut microbiota in health and disease
  • Inflammation and cancer
  • Obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases
  • Neurodegenerative diseases
  • Sarcopenia and frailty
  • Micronutrient genomics
  • Precision/personalized nutrition
  • Translation into practice

Prof. Dr. Hisanori Kato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Interaction of Dietary Linoleic Acid and α-Linolenic Acids with rs174547 in FADS1 Gene on Metabolic Syndrome Components among Vegetarians
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1686; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11071686 - 23 Jul 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1919
Abstract
Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) gene controls the fatty acid metabolism pathway in the human body. The lower intake of α-linolenic acid (ALA) than linoleic acid (LA) among vegetarians may disrupt the fatty acid metabolism and limit the conversion of ALA [...] Read more.
Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) gene controls the fatty acid metabolism pathway in the human body. The lower intake of α-linolenic acid (ALA) than linoleic acid (LA) among vegetarians may disrupt the fatty acid metabolism and limit the conversion of ALA to anti-inflammatory products such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the interaction of rs174547 in FADS1 gene with LA and ALA on metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. A total of 200 Chinese and Indian vegetarians in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor, Malaysia participated in the present study. The data on socio-demographic characteristics, vegetarianism practices, dietary practices, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure (BP), and overnight venous fasting blood samples were collected from the vegetarians. The rs174547 in FADS1 gene was significantly associated with MetS and its components such as waist circumference (WC) and fasting blood glucose (FBG). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that vegetarians with TT genotype of rs174547 in FADS1 gene had higher odds for MetS, larger WC, higher BP, and a lower level of HDL-c. Two-way ANOVA analysis showed that LA interacts with rs174547 in FADS1 gene to affect HDL-c (p < 0.05) among vegetarians. The present findings suggest the need to develop dietary guidelines for vegetarians in Malaysia. Prospective studies are also needed to affirm the interaction between LA and rs174547 in FADS1 gene on HDL-c among Malaysian vegetarians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from APNNO Biennial Conference 2018)
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Article
Association of Stress, Mental Health, and VEGFR-2 Gene Polymorphisms with Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese Malaysian Adults
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1140; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11051140 - 22 May 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1376
Abstract
Gene-environment (G × E) interactions involving job stress and mental health on risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are minimally explored. This study examined the association and G × E interaction effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) gene polymorphisms [...] Read more.
Gene-environment (G × E) interactions involving job stress and mental health on risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are minimally explored. This study examined the association and G × E interaction effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) gene polymorphisms (rs1870377, rs2071559) on cardiometabolic risk in Chinese Malaysian adults. Questionnaires: Job Stress Scale (JSS); Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21); and Rhode Island Stress and Coping Inventory (RISCI) were used to measure job stress, mental health, and coping with perceived stress. Cardiometabolic risk parameters were evaluated in plasma and genotyping analysis was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The subjects were 127 Chinese Malaysian adults. The allele frequencies for rs1870377 (A allele and T allele) and rs2071557 (A allele and T allele) polymorphisms were 0.48 and 0.52, and 0.37 and 0.63, respectively. Significant correlations include scores from JSS dimensions with blood glucose (BG) (p = 0.025–0.045), DASS-21 dimensions with blood pressure, BMI, and uric acid (p = 0.029–0.047), and RISCI with blood pressure and BG (p = 0.016–0.049). Significant G × E interactions were obtained for: rs1870377 with stress on total cholesterol (p = 0.035), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.019), and apolipoprotein B100 (p = 0.004); and rs2071559 with anxiety on blood pressure (p = 0.006–0.045). The significant G × E interactions prompt actions for managing stress and anxiety for the prevention of CVD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from APNNO Biennial Conference 2018)
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