Special Issue "Berries and Human Health: Mechanisms and Evidence"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cristian Del Bo'
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Environmental and Nutritional Sciences (DeFENS) – Division of Human Nutrition, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: berries; polyphenols; bioavailability and metabolism; oxidative stress; inflammation; vascular function; mechanistic studies; human intervention studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Daniela Martini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Environmental and Nutritional Sciences (DeFENS) – Division of Human Nutrition, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: bioactive compounds; polyphenols; oxidative stress; human intervention studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mirko Marino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Environmental and Nutritional Sciences (DeFENS) – Division of Human Nutrition, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: polyphenols absorption and metabolism; inflammation; vascular function; intestinal permeability; in vitro studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Berry fruits (e.g., blueberry, cranberry, strawberry, raspberry, black currant) have a wide range of nutrients such as fiber, vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds like polyphenols. Emerging scientific evidence supports their health-promoting potential against oxidative stress, inflammation, vascular dysfunction, and numerous metabolic dysregulations. However, most of the evidence is derived from in vitro and animal models, while observations from human studies deserve further investigations. The present Special Issue is now open for submission of original research manuscripts focused on dietary intervention studies exploring the role of berries and berry polyphenols in the protection and promotion of human health. In addition, studies on cell culture and animal models devoted to evaluating the molecular mechanisms underpinning the modulation of metabolic and functional activities are encouraged. Finally, systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses investigating the impact of berries in the modulation of risk factors and health outcome are also welcomed.

Dr. Cristian Del Bo'
Dr. Daniela Martini
Dr. Mirko Marino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Berries
  • Berry polyphenols
  • In vitro studies
  • Animal models
  • Human intervention studies
  • Systematic review/meta-analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Blackcurrant Improves Diabetic Cardiovascular Dysfunction by Reducing Inflammatory Cytokines in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Mice
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4177; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114177 (registering DOI) - 22 Nov 2021
Viewed by 517
Abstract
Diabetic cardiovascular dysfunction is a representative complication of diabetes. Inflammation associated with the onset and exacerbation of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an essential factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Diabetes-induced myocardial dysfunction is characterized by myocardial fibrosis, which includes [...] Read more.
Diabetic cardiovascular dysfunction is a representative complication of diabetes. Inflammation associated with the onset and exacerbation of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an essential factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Diabetes-induced myocardial dysfunction is characterized by myocardial fibrosis, which includes structural heart changes, myocardial cell death, and extracellular matrix protein accumulation. The mice groups in this study were divided as follows: Cont, control (db/m mice); T2DM, type 2 diabetes mellitus mice (db/db mice); Vil.G, db/db + vildagliptin 50 mg/kg/day, positive control, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor; Bla.C, db/db + blackcurrant 200 mg/kg/day. In this study, Bla.C treatment significantly improved the homeostatic model evaluation of glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) indices and diabetic blood markers such as HbA1c in T2DM mice. In addition, Bla.C improved cardiac function markers and cardiac thickening through echocardiography. Bla.C reduced the expression of fibrosis biomarkers, elastin and type IV collagen, in the left ventricle of a diabetic cardiopathy model. Bla.C also inhibited TD2M-induced elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in cardiac tissue (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and TGF-β). Thus, Bla.C significantly improved cardiac inflammation and cardiovascular fibrosis and dysfunction by blocking inflammatory cytokine activation signals. This showed that Bla.C treatment could ameliorate diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications in T2DM mice. These results provide evidence that Bla.C extract has a significant effect on the prevention of cardiovascular fibrosis, inflammation, and consequent diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications, directly or indirectly, by improving blood glucose profile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berries and Human Health: Mechanisms and Evidence)
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