Special Issue "Effects of Diet–Exercise Interaction on Human Health across the Lifespan"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alba Gomez-Cabello
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), 28029 Madrid, Spain
3. Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
4. Centro Universitario de la Defensa, 50090 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: physical fitness; sports science; exercise performance; exercise science; exercise physiology; strength and conditioning; exercise testing; resistance training; exercise intervention; athletic training
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Germán Vicente-Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
2. Department of Physiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences (FCSD), University of Zaragoza, Ronda Misericordia 5, 22001 Huesca, Spain
3. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), 28029 Madrid, Spain
4. Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: physical activity and health during life; exercise prescription, exercise–diet interaction for health; healthy and active aging; body composition; special populations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Specific exercise training programs, and physical activity more generally, have been reported as some of the best non-pharmacological ways to improve health-related factors throughout life (e.g., body composition, physical fitness, quality of life, even mortality). However, different types of exercise training may lead to distinct health benefits, and not all populations may respond in the same way. On the other hand, other important factors such as the status of several nutrients or poor nutrition are related to health issues and could also interfere with the benefits obtained throughout exercise programs. Moreover, the combined effects of nutrition and exercise on health have been investigated to a lesser extent. Therefore, in this Special Issue we are looking for original research articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing the combined effects or associations of exercise training, physical activity, and diet parameters on health in several populations over the course of a lifetime.

Prof. Dr. Alba Gomez-Cabello
Prof. Dr. Germán Vicente-Rodríguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nutritional status
  • energy intake
  • physical activity
  • training programs
  • physical fitness
  • health
  • quality of life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Caloric Restriction and Rope-Skipping Exercise on Cardiometabolic Health: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial in Young Adults
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3222; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13093222 - 16 Sep 2021
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Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of calorie restriction (CR), rope-skipping (RS) exercise, and their joint effects on cardiometabolic health in young adults. An 8-week randomized trial was conducted on 46 undergraduates aged 19–21 y from South China. The [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of calorie restriction (CR), rope-skipping (RS) exercise, and their joint effects on cardiometabolic health in young adults. An 8-week randomized trial was conducted on 46 undergraduates aged 19–21 y from South China. The participants were randomized into the following three groups: Calorie restriction (CR) group (n = 14), Rope-skipping (RS) group (n = 14), and CR plus RS (CR–RS) group (n = 12). At both allocation and the end of the intervention, data on anthropometry, serum metabolic, and inflammatory markers were collected. A total of 40 participants completed the intervention and were included in the analysis. After the 8-week intervention, the participants from the CR group and the CR–RS group reduced in body weight (−1.1 ± 1.7 kg, −1.3 ± 2.0 kg), body mass index (−0.4 ± 0.6 kg/m2, −0.5 ± 0.7 kg/m2), body fat percentage (−1.2 ± 1.6%, −1.7 ± 1.8%), and body fat mass (−1.1 kg (−2.2, −0.3), −1.1 kg (−2.5, −0.4)) compared to the baseline (p < 0.05 or p = 0.051). For metabolic and inflammatory factors, the participants in the CR–RS group showed significant decreases in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.40 mmol/L) and interleukin-8 (−0.73 mmol/L). While all the above markers showed no significant difference among the groups after intervention, in the subgroup of overweight/obese participants (n = 23), the CR–RS group had significantly lower blood pressure, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-8 levels than the CR or RS groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, both CR and CR–RS could reduce weight and improve body composition in young adults. More importantly, in those with overweight or obesity, CR–RS intervention might be superior to either CR or RS in improving cardiometabolic health. Full article
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Article
Fat–Fit Patterns, Drug Consumption, and Polypharmacy in Older Adults: The EXERNET Multi-Center Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2872; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082872 - 21 Aug 2021
Viewed by 506
Abstract
Background: Physical fitness levels and the amount of accumulated adipose tissue (fatness) relate to current and future individuals’ heath status. Nevertheless, the interrelationships of their combined patterns with polypharmacy and the types of medications consumed have not been sufficiently investigated. Methods: This cross-sectional [...] Read more.
Background: Physical fitness levels and the amount of accumulated adipose tissue (fatness) relate to current and future individuals’ heath status. Nevertheless, the interrelationships of their combined patterns with polypharmacy and the types of medications consumed have not been sufficiently investigated. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in six Spanish regions between 2008 and 2009 with a sample of older community-dwelling adults (≥65 years old) without dementia or cancer. Fitness was measured with one-leg balance and senior fitness tests, as well as by measuring weight and fat mass with a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Polypharmacy was defined as the use of five or more medications. An analysis of variance was performed for comparisons between the physical fitness and fatness patterns and the medication consumed. Results: A total of 1709 elders were included in the study (72.1 ± 5.2 years). The two unfit patterns were those with the highest drug consumption. The High-Fat–Unfit pattern was the one that had the most significant consumption and had the highest percentage of polymedicated subjects. The Low-Fat–Fit pattern had a significantly lower percentage of people that did not consume any medications. The highest percentages of drug consumption in 7 of the 10 groups that were included were concentrated in the two unfit patterns. Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of fitness in older adults, as it is at least as important as the avoidance of accumulation of excess fat with respect to the consumption of a smaller number of medicines. Full article
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