Special Issue "What to Eat and When to Eat: Eating Patterns for Healthy Metabolism"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Olga Pivovarova-Ramich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Molecular Nutritional Medicine Research Group, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
Interests: diabetes; obesity; nutrition; metabolism; chronobiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition strongly affects metabolic state and specific dietary patterns contribute to the risk of obesity, diabetes, and associated cardiometabolic dysfunctions, which are a large health and economic problem of modern society. Conversely, dietary strategies represent a powerful tool to improve metabolic processes and mitigate or reverse metabolic disorders. The search for such dietary patterns is a main goal of nutritional research.

Dietary patterns (also called eating patterns) describe the timing, frequency, and regularity as well as nutrient composition of consumed meals. Over the last decade, growing evidence has identified that it is not only important what to eat, but also when and how often to eat. Both food composition and meal timing across the day (and night) interact with endogenous circadian clock, affecting 24 h rhythms of hormonal secretion, metabolic gene expression, enzyme activity, and microbiome, resulting in the change in an individual’s metabolic state.

The aim of the current Special Issue is to report novel evidence concerning effects of eating patterns on cardiometabolic parameters and to discuss the possibility to improve metabolic health using this strategy. The Special Issue welcomes original research and review studies on the following topics:

  • Effects of food composition and/or meal timing on endogenous circadian rhythms
  • Metabolic effects of diurnal patterns of energy intake
  • Metabolic effects of diurnal patterns of food composition
  • Shift work
  • Meal frequency
  • Eating/fasting duration across the day

PD Dr. Olga Pivovarova-Ramich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Eating patterns
  • Food composition
  • Meal timing
  • Metabolic rhythms
  • Circadian rhythms
  • Cardiometabolic health

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Do Temporal Eating Patterns Differ in Healthy versus Unhealthy Overweight/Obese Individuals?
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4121; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114121 - 17 Nov 2021
Viewed by 573
Abstract
This study examined whether the temporal patterns of energy and macronutrient intake in early and late eating windows were associated with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUO) among non-shift workers. A total of 299 overweight/obese non-shift workers (Age: 40.3 ± [...] Read more.
This study examined whether the temporal patterns of energy and macronutrient intake in early and late eating windows were associated with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUO) among non-shift workers. A total of 299 overweight/obese non-shift workers (Age: 40.3 ± 6.9 years; 73.6% women; BMI: 31.7 ± 5.0 kg/m2) were recruited in the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. The biochemical parameters were determined from fasting blood samples, whereas information on dietary intake and timing was obtained from a 7-day diet history questionnaire. The midpoint of eating was used to determine the early and late windows. Compared to MHO non-shift workers (n = 173), MUO non-shift workers (n = 126) had lower energy intake from carbohydrates and protein during the early window. In contrast, MUO participants had greater energy intake from carbohydrates and fat during the late window. Participants with unhealthy metabolic status (regardless of their chronotypes) had similar temporal patterns of energy intake characterized by smaller energy intake during the early window and greater energy intake during the late window compared with participants with healthier metabolic status. Overall, the lowest percentile of energy intake during the early window was associated with an increased risk of MUO, after adjustment for potential confounders [odds ratio (OR) = 4.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41–13.11]. The greater the energy intake during the late window, the greater the risk of MUO (OR = 2.38, 95% CI 1.11–5.13) (OR = 2.33, 95% CI 1.03–5.32) (OR = 4.45, 95% CI 1.71–11.56). In summary, consuming less energy earlier in the day and more energy and carbohydrate later in the day was associated with a greater risk of MUO. Thus, a prospective study is needed to explore the potential role of chrono-nutrition practices in modifying risk factors to delay the transition of MHO to MUO. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What to Eat and When to Eat: Eating Patterns for Healthy Metabolism)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop