Special Issue "Fructose Metabolism and Metabolic Health Effects"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Samir Softic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Kentucky College of Medicine and Kentucky Children's Hospital, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
Interests: obesity;nutrition;insulin resistance;metabolism;lipid metabolism;childhood obesity;carbohydrate metabolism;insulin signaling;metabolic endocrinology;diabetes drug development
Prof. Dr. Miguel A Lanaspa Garcia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
Interests: nephrology
Prof. Dr. Brian J. DeBosch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departments of Pediatrics and Cell Biology & Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
Interests: complications; metabolic regulation and obesity; signal transduction/hormone action

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a worldwide epidemic of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Consumption of a high-fat diet was initially proposed to be the driver of the obesity epidemic. As low-fat foods became more popular and in demand, dietary fat was increasingly replaced by another highly palatable food source—refined sugar. However, accumulating evidence suggests that increased sugar consumption may actually be contributing to or driving poor metabolic outcomes associated with obesity.

Renewed interest in sugar metabolism has produced numerous observational studies, linking the intake of dietary sugar with poor metabolic outcomes. In spite of the renewed interest, several questions remain unanswered. First, is dietary sugar simply a vehicle for increased energy intake or is it intrinsically involved in the pathophysiology of obesity? Sugar is generally consumed after meals when subjects are not hungry. Sugar-sweetened beverages are consumed to quench thirst, not hunger. Thus, some suggest that placing a large emphasis on sugar intake is misplaced since increased caloric intake from almost any source will result in obesity. Next, what are the mechanisms linking sugar intake with poor metabolic outcomes? Can we explain on a molecular level why sugar metabolism would negatively affect cellular energy homeostasis? Do different dietary or artificial sugars carry the same metabolic risks? Lastly, can sugar reduction or pharmacologic inhibition of its metabolism serve as a treatment of metabolic dysfunction?

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect original research reports and review articles that provide the evidence to answer the above questions. Increased understanding of how sugar metabolism affects metabolic outcomes is urgently needed.

Prof. Dr. Samir Softic
Prof. Dr. Miguel A Lanaspa Garcia
Prof. Dr. Brian J. DeBosch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sugar
  • fructose
  • obesity
  • insulin resistance
  • metabolism
  • metabolic syndrome
  • NAFLD
  • chronic inflammation
  • nutrient intake
  • kidney disease
  • intestinal nutrient absorption

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Systems Approach Dissociates Fructose-Induced Liver Triglyceride from Hypertriglyceridemia and Hyperinsulinemia in Male Mice
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3642; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103642 - 18 Oct 2021
Viewed by 691
Abstract
The metabolic syndrome (MetS), defined as the co-occurrence of disorders including obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis, has become increasingly prevalent in the world over recent decades. Dietary and other environmental factors interacting with genetic predisposition are likely contributors to this epidemic. [...] Read more.
The metabolic syndrome (MetS), defined as the co-occurrence of disorders including obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis, has become increasingly prevalent in the world over recent decades. Dietary and other environmental factors interacting with genetic predisposition are likely contributors to this epidemic. Among the involved dietary factors, excessive fructose consumption may be a key contributor. When fructose is consumed in large amounts, it can quickly produce many of the features of MetS both in humans and mice. The mechanisms by which fructose contributes to metabolic disease and its potential interactions with genetic factors in these processes remain uncertain. Here, we generated a small F2 genetic cohort of male mice derived from crossing fructose-sensitive and -resistant mouse strains to investigate the interrelationships between fructose-induced metabolic phenotypes and to identify hepatic transcriptional pathways that associate with these phenotypes. Our analysis indicates that the hepatic transcriptional pathways associated with fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia are distinct from those that associate with fructose-mediated changes in body weight and liver triglyceride. These results suggest that multiple independent mechanisms and pathways may contribute to different aspects of fructose-induced metabolic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fructose Metabolism and Metabolic Health Effects)
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Review

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Review
Maternal Fructose Diet-Induced Developmental Programming
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3278; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13093278 - 20 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 875
Abstract
Developmental programming of chronic diseases by perinatal exposures/events is the basic tenet of the developmental origins hypothesis of adult disease (DOHaD). With consumption of fructose becoming more common in the diet, the effect of fructose exposure during pregnancy and lactation is of increasing [...] Read more.
Developmental programming of chronic diseases by perinatal exposures/events is the basic tenet of the developmental origins hypothesis of adult disease (DOHaD). With consumption of fructose becoming more common in the diet, the effect of fructose exposure during pregnancy and lactation is of increasing relevance. Human studies have identified a clear effect of fructose consumption on maternal health, but little is known of the direct or indirect effects on offspring. Animal models have been utilized to evaluate this concept and an association between maternal fructose and offspring chronic disease, including hypertension and metabolic syndrome. This review will address the mechanisms of developmental programming by maternal fructose and potential options for intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fructose Metabolism and Metabolic Health Effects)
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