Special Issue "Dietary Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs): Link between Health and Diseases"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 August 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Casper G. Schalkwijk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht University Medical Center, Universiteitssingel 50, 6200MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
Interests: endothelial cell biology; obesity; insulin resistance; vascular complications; endothelial function
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Frédéric J. Tessier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Medical School, University of Lille, INSERM U1167, RID-AGE, 59045 Lille, France
Interests: food quality; glycation; Maillard reaction; nutrition; analytical chemistry; ageing; diabetes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are generated when fats and sugars react with proteins in our diet, and the formation is further increased by cooking and processing. Over the past decades, dietary habits have dramatically changed due to the increased consumption of processed foods, thereby increasing the exposure to dietary AGEs. The bioavailability and physiological consequences of dietary AGEs are largely unknown. These dietary AGEs may have consequences on the gastrointestinal tract and on intestinal microbiota, and may enter the blood circulation, where they may have effects on different tissues and/or may be directly excreted in urine. High circulating levels of AGEs have been implicated in inflammation and various adverse cardio-metabolic health outcomes such as insulin resistance, pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, T2DM, arterial stiffness, disorders of the central nervous system, and even mortality. Although several important contributions have been made in this field, it remains unclear to what extent dietary AGEs play a role in these adverse health outcomes. In fact, we cannot exclude the possibility that there are also beneficial effects of dietary AGEs. In this Special Issue, progress made in aspects of dietary AGEs and human health will be included. We ask the experts in the field to contribute their latest research, perspectives, or reviews on this fascinating and rapidly progressing topic.

Prof. Dr. Casper Schalkwijk
Prof. Dr. Frédéric J. Tessier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • advanced glycation end products
  • AGEs
  • diet
  • metabolic disease
  • methylglyoxal
  • inflammation
  • insulin resistance
  • vascular function
  • cognitive function dietary supplements

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Dietary Advanced Glycation End-Products and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3132; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13093132 - 08 Sep 2021
Viewed by 852
Abstract
Dietary advanced glycation end-products (dAGEs) have been hypothesized to be associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by promoting inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the colonic epithelium. However, evidence from prospective cohort studies is scarce and inconclusive. We evaluated [...] Read more.
Dietary advanced glycation end-products (dAGEs) have been hypothesized to be associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by promoting inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the colonic epithelium. However, evidence from prospective cohort studies is scarce and inconclusive. We evaluated CRC risk associated with the intake of dAGEs in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Dietary intakes of three major dAGEs: Nε-carboxy-methyllysine (CML), Nε-carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) were estimated in 450,111 participants (median follow-up = 13 years, with 6162 CRC cases) by matching to a detailed published European food composition database. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations of dAGEs with CRC were computed using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models. Inverse CRC risk associations were observed for CML (HR comparing extreme quintiles: HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85–1.00) and MG-H1 (HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85–1.00), but not for CEL (HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.89–1.05). The associations did not differ by sex or anatomical location of the tumor. Contrary to the initial hypothesis, our findings suggest an inverse association between dAGEs and CRC risk. More research is required to verify these findings and better differentiate the role of dAGEs from that of endogenously produced AGEs and their precursor compounds in CRC development. Full article

Review

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Review
Effect of Advanced Glycation End-Products and Excessive Calorie Intake on Diet-Induced Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation Biomarkers in Murine Models
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3091; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13093091 - 02 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation (CLGI) is a non-overt inflammatory state characterized by a continuous activation of inflammation mediators associated with metabolic diseases. It has been linked to the overconsumption of Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), and/or macronutrients which lead to an increase in local and [...] Read more.
Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation (CLGI) is a non-overt inflammatory state characterized by a continuous activation of inflammation mediators associated with metabolic diseases. It has been linked to the overconsumption of Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), and/or macronutrients which lead to an increase in local and systemic pro-inflammatory biomarkers in humans and animal models. This review provides a summary of research into biomarkers of diet-induced CLGI in murine models, with a focus on AGEs and obesogenic diets, and presents the physiological effects described in the literature. Diet-induced CLGI is associated with metabolic endotoxemia, and/or gut microbiota remodeling in rodents. The mechanisms identified so far are centered on pro-inflammatory axes such as the interaction between AGEs and their main receptor AGEs (RAGE) or increased levels of lipopolysaccharide. The use of murine models has helped to elucidate the local and systemic expression of CLGI mediators. These models have enabled significant advances in identification of diet-induced CLGI biomarkers and resultant physiological effects. Some limitations on the translational (murine → humans) use of biomarkers may arise, but murine models have greatly facilitated the testing of specific dietary components. However, there remains a lack of information at the whole-organism level of organization, as well as a lack of consensus on the best biomarker for use in CLGI studies and recommendations as to future research conclude this review. Full article
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