Special Issue "Meal Frequency and Timing in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alison M. Coates
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Allied Health and Human Performance, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Interests: meal timing; eating patterns; circadian rhythm; shift work; cardiovascular risk factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Maxine Bonham
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Monash University
Interests: nutrition interventions; dietary intake; meal timing; circadian rhythms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Jill Dorrian
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia
Interests: sleep; chronobiology, shiftwork, sleep in pregnancy, biostatistics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jonathan D Johnston
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, United Kingdom
Interests: circadian; chrono-nutrition; physiology; endocrinology; metabolism; melatonin; photoperiod; human laboratory studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The timing and frequency of eating occasions, including meals and snacks, are known to impact the development of chronic health conditions. Understanding how eating patterns interact with physiological and metabolic processes to influence health is critical for the development of dietary guidelines framed around the timing and composition of eating occasions.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled Meal Frequency and Timing in Health and Disease, encourages the submission of original quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method manuscripts describing research conducted in humans that are based on this topic. Scientific reviews of the literature and manuscripts exploring novel assessments of capturing timing of eating and meal frequency associated with health outcomes are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Alison M. Coates

Guest Editor

Assoc. Prof. Jill Dorrian
Assoc. Prof. Maxine Bonham
Prof. Dr. Jonathan D. Johnston
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Meal timing
  • Eating patterns
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Shift work

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Content Validation of a Chrononutrition Questionnaire for the General and Shift Work Populations: A Delphi Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4087; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114087 - 15 Nov 2021
Viewed by 638
Abstract
Unusual meal timing has been associated with a higher prevalence of chronic disease. Those at greater risk include shift workers and evening chronotypes. This study aimed to validate the content of a Chrononutrition Questionnaire for shift and non-shift workers to identify temporal patterns [...] Read more.
Unusual meal timing has been associated with a higher prevalence of chronic disease. Those at greater risk include shift workers and evening chronotypes. This study aimed to validate the content of a Chrononutrition Questionnaire for shift and non-shift workers to identify temporal patterns of eating in relation to chronotype. Content validity was determined using a Delphi study of three rounds. Experts rated the relevance of, and provided feedback on, 46 items across seven outcomes: meal regularity, times of first eating occasion, last eating occasion, largest meal, main meals/snacks, wake, and sleep, which were edited in response. Items with greater than 70% consensus of relevance were accepted. Rounds one, two, and three had 28, 26, and 24 experts, respectively. Across three rounds, no outcomes were irrelevant, but seven were merged into three for ease of usage, and two sections were added for experts to rate and comment on. In the final round, all but one of 29 items achieved greater than 70% consensus of relevance with no further changes. The Chrononutrition Questionnaire was deemed relevant to experts in circadian biology and chrononutrition, and could represent a convenient tool to assess temporal patterns of eating in relation to chronotype in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meal Frequency and Timing in Health and Disease)
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