Special Issue "Innovative Food and Nutrition Approaches to Promote Healthy Lifestyles and Reduce Disparities"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jared T. McGuirt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27412, USA
Interests: multi-level community and clinical interventions; food access; retail food environment; digital technologies for nutrition education; GIS and spatial analysis; racial and geographic health disparities; rural health; implicit bias; systems and networks
Prof. Dr. Gina Tripicchio
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
Interests: nutritional education; nutrition; child nutrition community nutrition; disease prevention; childhood/pediatric obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Health behaviours are influenced by complex interactions between interpersonal, social, and environmental factors. This complexity makes the modification of health-related behaviours and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle difficult for many to achieve. This is particularly the case for certain population groups who have unequal access to opportunities to learn about nutrition or adopt healthier lifestyles, which has led to concerning disparities in preventable diet-related disease outcomes. Complex issues require innovative solutions. To solve these issues, solutions may be needed that challenge norms and push the boundaries of current health promotion approaches. There has been a recent increase in the use of innovative solutions that create or leverage digital technologies, use systems science, and utilize big data analytics, among others. These types of disruptive innovations are creating new opportunities and value networks for promoting health, and may be necessary to ensure equal opportunity to a healthy lifestyle in the future.

If your research has conducted feasibility or impact testing of innovative approaches to promote healthy lifestyles and dietary habits, including among understudied populations experiencing health disparities, please consider including your work in this special Nutrients supplement: Innovative Food and Nutrition Approaches to Promote Healthy Lifestyles and Reduce Disparities.

Prof. Dr. Jared T. McGuirt
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Gina Tripicchio
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovation
  • digital technologies
  • nutrition
  • disparities

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Acceptability and Willingness to Pay for a Meal Kit Program for African American Families with Low Income: A Pilot Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2881; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082881 - 21 Aug 2021
Viewed by 652
Abstract
Food insecurity is a persistent issue among individuals with low income and is associated with various nutrition- and health-related consequences. Creative approaches to increasing food access should be investigated as possible solutions. Meal kits, which are boxes or bags of fresh and shelf-stable [...] Read more.
Food insecurity is a persistent issue among individuals with low income and is associated with various nutrition- and health-related consequences. Creative approaches to increasing food access should be investigated as possible solutions. Meal kits, which are boxes or bags of fresh and shelf-stable ingredients for one or more meals, along with a step-by-step recipe showing how to cook each meal at home, may serve as a creative solution. Meal kits have historically been marketed to higher-income demographics. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the utilization, acceptability, and willingness to pay for a healthy meal kit program among African American main food preparers with children and low income (n = 36). Participants received a healthy meal kit with three recipes and ingredients, a cooking incentive, and a nutrition handout weekly for six weeks. Data were collected on participants’ use, acceptability, and willingness to pay for the meal kits and analyzed using descriptive statistics. The intervention was highly utilized, and participants reported high acceptability ratings for most recipes. After the intervention, participants were willing to pay $88.61 ± 47.47 for a meal kit with three meals, each with four portions, which was higher than indicated at baseline and similar to the cost to produce the kits. Meal kits may offer a creative solution to improving food access if affordable for families with low income. Full article
Article
Assessment of Cooking Matters Facebook Platform to Promote Healthy Eating Behaviors among Low-Income Caregivers of Young Children in the United States: A Pilot Study
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2694; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082694 - 04 Aug 2021
Viewed by 613
Abstract
How best to deliver healthy-eating education through social media among a low-income population remains understudied. To assess the impact of the Cooking Matters (CM) Facebook page on healthy eating behaviors among low-income caregivers, we conducted a pre–post survey of new CM Facebook followers [...] Read more.
How best to deliver healthy-eating education through social media among a low-income population remains understudied. To assess the impact of the Cooking Matters (CM) Facebook page on healthy eating behaviors among low-income caregivers, we conducted a pre–post survey of new CM Facebook followers in early 2020. A convenience sample was recruited at baseline from WICShopper app users and the CM Facebook page. The recruited sample included 397 low-income caregivers of a child younger than 6 who never followed CM Facebook. Among the baseline caregivers, 184 completed the follow-up survey. Paired t-test and McNemar–Bowker tests were conducted to compare the outcomes pre- and post-following CM Facebook. A binary indicator was developed to measure whether the outcomes were improved (1 = Improved; 0 = Not improved). Multi-variable logistic regressions were applied to examine the relationship between whether the outcome was improved with reference to the baseline socio-demographics. No significant differences were detected between pre and post outcomes overall (p > 0.05), except improvement in feeding healthy meals within the budget available (p < 0.05). However, improvement in select outcomes was more significant in men and single-parent households. The CM Facebook page could be an important platform to influence low-income caregivers of young children. Full article
Article
Stakeholders’ Views on Mobile Applications to Deliver Infant and Toddler Feeding Education to Latina Mothers of Low Socioeconomic Status
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2569; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082569 - 27 Jul 2021
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Infant- and toddler-feeding (ITF) practices are critical to long-term health and chronic disease prevention. Using mobile applications (apps) to promote desirable ITF practices shows promise for overcoming challenges of in-person education. However, the viability of ITF apps for Latina mothers of low-socioeconomic status [...] Read more.
Infant- and toddler-feeding (ITF) practices are critical to long-term health and chronic disease prevention. Using mobile applications (apps) to promote desirable ITF practices shows promise for overcoming challenges of in-person education. However, the viability of ITF apps for Latina mothers of low-socioeconomic status (SES) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize stakeholders’ views on Latina mothers’ capability, motivation, and barriers to using ITF apps. New York City-based health professionals who frequently engage with Latina mothers of low SES completed in-depth interviews. Directed content analysis was used to identify themes through theoretical and inductive codes. Participants included dietitians, nutrition educators, and physicians (n = 17). The following themes were identified: (1) Most Latina mothers of low-SES are tech-savvy (i.e., high capability and experience using smartphones and apps); (2) Apps are an appealing way to deliver ITF education; (3) There are challenges to using apps that must be carefully considered for ITF education development. Overall, ITF apps are a viable option as skills and use appear high among Latina mothers. Key considerations for app development include targeted app promotion; detailed instructions for obtaining and using app; more visuals, less text for low literacy and multiple dialects; making key features available offline. Full article
Communication
Perceived Facilitators and Barriers to Engaging with a Digital Intervention among Those with Food Insecurity, Binge Eating, and Obesity
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2458; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072458 - 19 Jul 2021
Viewed by 677
Abstract
Interventions that address binge eating and food insecurity are needed. Engaging people with lived experience to understand their needs and preferences could yield important design considerations for such interventions. In this study, people with food insecurity, recurrent binge eating, and obesity completed an [...] Read more.
Interventions that address binge eating and food insecurity are needed. Engaging people with lived experience to understand their needs and preferences could yield important design considerations for such interventions. In this study, people with food insecurity, recurrent binge eating, and obesity completed an interview-based needs assessment to learn facilitators and barriers that they perceive would impact their engagement with a digital intervention for managing binge eating and weight. Twenty adults completed semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged. Participants shared considerations that impact their ability to access the intervention (e.g., cost of intervention, cost of technology, accessibility across devices), ability to complete intervention recommendations (e.g., affordable healthy meals, education to help stretch groceries, food vouchers, rides to grocery stores, personalized to budget), and preferred intervention features for education, self-monitoring, personalization, support, and motivation/rewards. Engaging people with lived experiences via user-centered design methods revealed important design considerations for a digital intervention to meet this population’s needs. Future research is needed to test whether a digital intervention that incorporates these recommendations is engaging and effective for people with binge eating and food insecurity. Findings may have relevance to designing digital interventions for other health problems as well. Full article
Back to TopTop