Special Issue "Nutrition, Metabolites, and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Christopher Papandreou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili, Reus, Spain
Interests: metabolomics; gut microbiota; diet; nutrition; aging; cardiometabolic diseases; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in high-throughput metabolomics profiling have allowed epidemiology research to advance our understanding in many aspects of human health. Nutritional epidemiology has not been the exception, and the integration of metabolomics into traditional nutritional research has already provided new functional insight into the role of nutrition in health. Furthermore, metabolomics holds considerable promise for discovering new biomarkers of nutrient intake that may more precisely define the nutritional exposure, complementing self-report dietary assessment methods and providing better estimates of disease risk in epidemiological studies.

The purpose of this Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Nutrition, Metabolites, and Human Health”, is to add to the current nutritional metabolomics evidence from original research or narrative/systematic reviews of the recent scientific literature or meta-analyses in humans (interventional and observational studies) or animal models. This issue welcomes the submission of manuscripts that integrate metabolomics, and also other omics techniques, such as genomics and metagenomics, with nutrition and that examine their role in human health.

Dr. Christopher Papandreou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolomics
  • microbial metabolites
  • gut microbiota
  • diet
  • food
  • nutrition
  • aging
  • cardiometabolic outcomes
  • cancer

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Examining the Interaction of the Gut Microbiome with Host Metabolism and Cardiometabolic Health in Metabolic Syndrome
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4318; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13124318 - 29 Nov 2021
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Abstract
(1) Background: The microbiota-host cross-talk has been previously investigated, while its role in health is not yet clear. This study aimed to unravel the network of microbial-host interactions and correlate it with cardiometabolic risk factors. (2) Methods: A total of 47 adults with [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The microbiota-host cross-talk has been previously investigated, while its role in health is not yet clear. This study aimed to unravel the network of microbial-host interactions and correlate it with cardiometabolic risk factors. (2) Methods: A total of 47 adults with overweight/obesity and metabolic syndrome from the METADIET study were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Microbiota composition (151 genera) was assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing, fecal (m = 203) and plasma (m = 373) metabolites were profiled. An unsupervised sparse generalized canonical correlation analysis was used to construct a network of microbiota-metabolite interactions. A multi-omics score was derived for each cluster of the network and associated with cardiometabolic risk factors. (3) Results: Five multi-omics clusters were identified. Thirty-one fecal metabolites formed these clusters and were correlated with plasma sphingomyelins, lysophospholipids and medium to long-chain acylcarnitines. Seven genera from Ruminococcaceae and a member from the Desulfovibrionaceae family were correlated with fecal and plasma metabolites. Positive correlations were found between the multi-omics scores from two clusters with cholesterol and triglycerides levels. (4) Conclusions: We identified a correlated network between specific microbial genera and fecal/plasma metabolites in an adult population with metabolic syndrome, suggesting an interplay between gut microbiota and host lipid metabolism on cardiometabolic health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Metabolites, and Human Health)
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Article
Changes in Circulating Metabolites during Weight Loss and Weight Loss Maintenance in Relation to Cardiometabolic Risk
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4289; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13124289 - 27 Nov 2021
Viewed by 565
Abstract
(1) Background: There is a substantial lack of knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms by which weight loss and weight regain exert their beneficial and adverse effects, respectively, on cardiometabolic outcomes. We examined associations between changes in circulating metabolites and changes in cardiometabolic risk [...] Read more.
(1) Background: There is a substantial lack of knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms by which weight loss and weight regain exert their beneficial and adverse effects, respectively, on cardiometabolic outcomes. We examined associations between changes in circulating metabolites and changes in cardiometabolic risk factors during diet-induced weight loss and weight loss maintenance. (2) Methods: This prospective analysis of data from the Satiety Innovation (SATIN) study involved adults living with overweight and obesity (mean age=47.5). One hundred sixty-two subjects achieving ≥8% weight loss during an initial 8-week low-calorie diet (LCD) were included in a 12-week weight loss maintenance period. Circulating metabolites (m=123) were profiled using a targeted multiplatform approach. Data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models. (3) Results: Decreases in the concentrations of several phosphatidylcholines (PCs), sphingomyelins (SMs), and valine were consistently associated with decreases in total (TChol) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels during the LCD. Increases in PCs and SMs were significantly associated with increases in TChol and LDL-C during the weight loss maintenance period. Decreases and increases in PCs during LCD and maintenance period, respectively, were associated with decreases in the levels of triglycerides. (4) Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that decreases in circulating PCs and SMs during weight loss and the subsequent weight loss maintenance period may decrease the cardiovascular risk through impacting TChol and LDL-C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Metabolites, and Human Health)
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