Special Issue "Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jesus Seco-Calvo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), University of León, León, Spain
Interests: sports; athletes; hormones; metabolic recovery; immune function; muscle damage and repair; physiological processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Having a good quality of life means following adequate nutrition and regular physical activity. This combination also reduces the risk of many disease cardiovascular and metabolic while increasing our levels of physical performance. These aspects are also very important in the aged people. Therefore, we focusing the subject in the field of physical activity, the influence of nutrition on the health, performance and recovery of the subject. Topics include, but are not limited to, the effects of varying nutritional practices and interventions on these exercise-related outcomes for all age groups.

In this context, new studies are needed with the potential to produce significant improvements in knowledge of the relationship about the nutritional status and functionality. This Special Issue on “Nutrition, nutritional status and functionality” invites authors to submit original research articles (randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, practice-based/real-world evidence/registry studies, etc.), systematic reviews, narrative or scoping reviews, and meta-analyses that enhance the body of knowledge in this field. Research conducted in populations that have received little attention thus far is of particular interest. Controversial works that may lead to a potential paradigm shift will receive highest priority for inclusion.

Prof. Dr. Jesus Seco-Calvo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy requirement
  • exercise
  • frailty
  • muscle power
  • nutrition
  • nutritional status
  • olders
  • physical activity
  • physical function

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Modified WCRF/AICR Score and All-Cause, Digestive System, Cardiovascular, Cancer and Other-Cause-Related Mortality: A Competing Risk Analysis of Two Cohort Studies Conducted in Southern Italy
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4002; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13114002 - 10 Nov 2021
Viewed by 469
Abstract
Background: In real life, nutrition goes beyond purely biological domains. Primary prevention is the most efficient approach for reducing the risk of mortality. We aimed to study the association of lifestyle, as measured by a modified World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer [...] Read more.
Background: In real life, nutrition goes beyond purely biological domains. Primary prevention is the most efficient approach for reducing the risk of mortality. We aimed to study the association of lifestyle, as measured by a modified World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (mWCRF/AICR) scoring system with all-cause, digestive system disease-related (DSD-related), cardiovascular disease-related (CVD-related), cancer–related and other cause-related mortality using data from two population-based cohort studies conducted in Southern Italy. Methods: A random sample of 5271 subjects aged 18 years or older was enrolled in 2005–2006 and followed up until 2020. Usual food intakes were estimated using a validated dietary questionnaire. Competing risks survival models were applied. Results: High adherence to the mWCRF/AICR score was found to be statistically significant and negatively associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.56, 95%CI 0.39; 0.82), DSD-related mortality (SHR 0.38, 95%CI 0.15; 0.97) and cancer-related mortality (SHR 0.43, 95%CI 0.19; 0.97) in the male sub-cohort and other-cause mortality (SHR 0.43, 95%CI 0.21; 0.88) only in the female group. Conclusions: This mWCRF/AICR score can be seen as a simple, easy tool for use in clinical practice to evaluate both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality)
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Article
Impact of Optimal Timing of Intake of Multi-Ingredient Performance Supplements on Sports Performance, Muscular Damage, and Hormonal Behavior across a Ten-Week Training Camp in Elite Cyclists: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3746; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13113746 - 23 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS), ingested pre- or post-workout, have been shown to increase physiological level effects and integrated metabolic response on exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of pre-and post-training supplementation with its own MIPS, associated with CHO [...] Read more.
Multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS), ingested pre- or post-workout, have been shown to increase physiological level effects and integrated metabolic response on exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of pre-and post-training supplementation with its own MIPS, associated with CHO (1 g·kg−1) plus protein (0.3 g·kg−1) on exercise-related benchmarks across a training camp for elite cyclists. Thirty elite male cyclists participated in a randomized non-placebo-controlled trial for ten weeks assigned to one of three groups (n = 10 each): a control group treated with CHO plus protein after training (CG); a group treated with MIPS before training and a CHO plus protein after training, (PRE-MIPS); a group treated with CHO plus protein plus MIPS after training, (POST-MIPS). Performance parameters included (VO2max, peak; median and minimum power (W) and fatigue index (%)); hormonal response (Cortisol; Testosterone; and Testosterone/Cortisol ratio); and muscle biomarkers (Creatine kinase (CK), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and Myoglobin (Mb)) were assessed. MIPS administered before or after training (p ≤ 0.05) was significantly influential in attenuating CK, LDH, and MB; stimulating T response and modulating C; and improved on all markers of exercise performance. These responses were greater when MIPS was administered post-workout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality)
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Article
The Nutritional Status of Long-Term Institutionalized Older Adults Is Associated with Functional Status, Physical Performance and Activity, and Frailty
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3716; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13113716 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 429
Abstract
Among older adults living in long-term nursing homes (LTNHs), maintaining an adequate functional status and independence is a challenge. Whilst a poor nutritional status is a potential risk factor for a decreased function in this population, its role is not fully understood. Here, [...] Read more.
Among older adults living in long-term nursing homes (LTNHs), maintaining an adequate functional status and independence is a challenge. Whilst a poor nutritional status is a potential risk factor for a decreased function in this population, its role is not fully understood. Here, using a transversal multicenter study of 105 older adults living in 13 LTNHs, we analyzed the associations between nutritional status, as measured by the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and the parameters of functional status, physical performance, physical activity, and frailty as well as comorbidity and body composition. The MNA scores were positively correlated with the Barthel Index, handgrip strength, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) scores, absolute muscle power, and Assessment of Physical Activity in Frail Older People (APAFOP) scores and were negatively correlated with dynamic balance and frailty. In a multiple linear regression model controlling for gender and age, the APAFOP score (β = 0.386), BMI (β = 0.301), and Barthel Index (β = 0.220) explained 31% of the variance in the MNA score. Given the observed close relationship between the MNA score and functional status, physical performance and activity, and frailty, interventions should jointly target improvements in both the nutritional status and functional status of LTNH residents. Strategies designed and implemented by interdisciplinary professional teams may be the most successful in improving these parameters to lead to better health and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality)
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Article
Sex Differences in Supplement Intake in Recreational Endurance Runners—Results from the NURMI Study (Step 2)
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2776; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082776 - 13 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
It has been well-documented that female and male athletes differ in many physiological and psychological characteristics related to endurance performance. This sex-based difference appears to be associated with their nutritional demands including the patterns of supplement intake. However, there is a paucity of [...] Read more.
It has been well-documented that female and male athletes differ in many physiological and psychological characteristics related to endurance performance. This sex-based difference appears to be associated with their nutritional demands including the patterns of supplement intake. However, there is a paucity of research addressing the sex differences in supplement intake amongst distance runners. The present study aimed to investigate and compare supplement intake between female and male distance runners (10 km, half-marathon, (ultra-)marathon) and the potential associations with diet type and race distance. A total of 317 runners participated in an online survey, and 220 distance runners (127 females and 93 males) made up the final sample after a multi-stage data clearance. Participants were also assigned to dietary (omnivorous, vegetarian, vegan) and race distance (10-km, half-marathon, marathon/ultra-marathon) subgroups. Sociodemographic characteristics and the patterns of supplement intake including type, frequency, dosage, and brands were collected using a questionnaire. One-way ANOVA and logistic regression were used for data analysis. A total of 54.3% of female runners and 47.3% male runners reported consuming supplements regularly. The frequency of supplement intake was similar between females and males (generally or across dietary and distance subgroups). There was no significant relationship for sex alone or sex interactions with diet type and race distance on supplement intake (p < 0.05). However, a non-significant higher intake of vitamin and mineral (but not CHO/protein) supplements was reported by vegan and vegetarian (but not by omnivorous) females compared to their male counterparts. In summary, despite the reported findings, sex could not be considered as a strong modulator of supplement intake among different groups of endurance runners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality)
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Article
Supplement Intake in Recreational Vegan, Vegetarian, and Omnivorous Endurance Runners—Results from the NURMI Study (Step 2)
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2741; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082741 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Nutrient deficiency is a common cause of underperformance in endurance athletes, and supplement intake is frequently considered compensatory for vegan and vegetarian athletes specifically. This study aimed to investigate the patterns of supplement intake among vegan, vegetarian, and omnivorous distance (>10 km) runners [...] Read more.
Nutrient deficiency is a common cause of underperformance in endurance athletes, and supplement intake is frequently considered compensatory for vegan and vegetarian athletes specifically. This study aimed to investigate the patterns of supplement intake among vegan, vegetarian, and omnivorous distance (>10 km) runners and its association with age, sex, and race distance. From a total of 317 runners who participated in an online survey, 220 distance runners (mean age: 38.5 years; mean BMI: 21.75 kg/m2) were selected for the final sample after data clearance and assigned to 100 omnivores, 40 vegetarians, or 80 vegans. Sociodemographic information, racing experience, and patterns of supplement intake, including type, frequency, dosage, etc., were collected using a questionnaire. Macronutrient intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. ANOVA and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The prevalence of supplement intake was 51% for total runners and 72% among vegan runners. Age, sex, and race distance had no significant effect on the type of supplement intake (p > 0.05). Compared to omnivores and vegetarians, vegan runners reported consuming more vitamin (but not carbohydrate/protein or mineral) supplements (p < 0.05). Vitamin B12, magnesium, and multivitamin had the most prevalent use amongst micronutrient supplements. This study points to a central role for supplementary nutritional strategies in different groups of distance runners. The present findings may help future investigations by design to identify specific requirements of endurance runners when adhering to specific kinds of diet particularly plant-based diets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Nutritional Status and Functionality)
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