Special Issue "Plant-Based Supplementation, Endurance Performance and Fatigue"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stephen Ives
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health and Human Physiological Sciences Department, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA
Interests: nutrition; muscle; exercise science; cardiovascular physiology; exercise physiology; atherosclerosis; exercise
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Christopher Kotarsky
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Human Physiological Sciences, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA
Interests: nutrition; muscle; exercise science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The acute and chronic demands of exercise training can impose a heavy physiological cost, which ultimately leads to greater adaptation and capacity. However, acutely high-intensity training and/or high-volume training can dramatically elevate free radicals, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation. In periods of such intense training or competition, inadequate recovery between sessions may impair recovery from the physical and subsequent physiological challenge. The regular mismatch between training stimulus and recovery, as well as a desire to maximize the responses to training, has led athletes to modulate their nutritional strategies. One such strategy is supplementing their diet with specific macronutrients (e.g., protein), micronutrients (e.g., vitamins), and increasingly other factors, such as adaptogens, nootropics, and antioxidants. In parallel, there is increasing demand, and some evidence, for exploring and using plant-based nutrients due to nutritional or lifestyle choices as well as documented efficacy of biomolecules with known physiological targets.  Accordingly, plant-based supplementation is growing in popularity, even though rigorous translational studies in humans are often lacking.

This Special Issue seeks submissions of manuscripts on original research or analytical reviews on the effects of plant-based supplementation on exercise performance and/or fatigue. Though work in humans may be preferential in translational strength, mechanistic work in animals may also prove valuable fodder for further work in humans and is welcomed.

Dr. Stephen Ives
Dr. Christopher Kotarsky
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant-based
  • endurance
  • exercise
  • sport
  • athletes
  • supplementation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Korean Red Ginseng Ameliorates Fatigue via Modulation of 5-HT and Corticosterone in a Sleep-Deprived Mouse Model
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3121; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13093121 - 06 Sep 2021
Viewed by 829
Abstract
Central fatigue, which is neuromuscular dysfunction associated with neurochemical alterations, is an important clinical issue related to pathologic fatigue. This study aimed to investigate the anti-central fatigue effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) and its underlying mechanism. Male BALB/c mice (8 weeks old) [...] Read more.
Central fatigue, which is neuromuscular dysfunction associated with neurochemical alterations, is an important clinical issue related to pathologic fatigue. This study aimed to investigate the anti-central fatigue effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) and its underlying mechanism. Male BALB/c mice (8 weeks old) were subjected to periodic sleep deprivation (SD) for 6 cycles (forced wakefulness for 2 days + 1 normal day per cycle). Simultaneously, the mice were administered KRG (0, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg) or ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg). After all cycles, the rotarod and grip strength tests were performed, and then the changes regarding stress- and neurotransmitter-related parameters in serum and brain tissue were evaluated. Six cycles of SD notably deteriorated exercise performance in both the rotarod and grip strength tests, while KRG administration significantly ameliorated these alterations. KRG also significantly attenuated the SD-induced depletion of serum corticosterone. The levels of main neurotransmitters related to the sleep/wake cycle were markedly altered (serotonin was overproduced while dopamine levels were decreased) by SD, and KRG significantly attenuated these alterations through relevant molecules including brain-derived neurotropic factor and serotonin transporter. This study demonstrated the anti-fatigue effects of KRG in an SD mouse model, indicating the clinical relevance of KRG. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Supplementation, Endurance Performance and Fatigue)
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