Special Issue "Protein Metabolism in Ageing"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anna Ardévol
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MoBioFood Research Group, Dept. de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain
Interests: enteroendocrine hormones; aging; new proteins; food intake
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Montserrat Pinent Armengol
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
MoBioFood Research Group, Dept. de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain
Interests: metabolism; enteroendocrine system; food bioactives; health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world’s population is increasing and life span extending. Aging leads to a homeostatic loss in the body, and proteins play a key role in the body’s proper functionality; therefore, protein maintenance plays a central in compensating for aging processes.

The available protein of animal origin cannot cover the entire protein requirement. For this reason, intense research exists for the identification of new protein sources. The daily amount of protein is important, as is its quality and the timing of administration in relation to physical exercise.

Another aspect to be considered is anorexia associated with aging, which shows a 20% incidence in old age. This anorexia increases protein–energy malnutrition and is observed in older individuals even in situations of health and adequate food availability. Among the causes to explain it, there is a decreased feeling of hunger associated with a lower energy requirement and the existence of more effective mechanisms of satiety. Beyond its nutritional contribution as a macronutrient, dietary protein acts at the intestinal level by activating the secretion of enterohormones, which control processes such as satiety. Different sources of protein can lead to a different profile of enterohormones, and consequently, differentially modulate food intake.

In the study of new sources of protein for increasingly aging populations, all these aspects must be considered.

Dr. Anna Ardévol
Guest Editor

Dr. Montserrat Pinent Armengol
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Protein intake
  • Aging
  • Metabolism
  • Intestinal signaling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Determining the Influence of Habitual Dietary Protein Intake on Physiological Muscle Parameters in Youth and Older Age
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3560; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103560 - 12 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Protein ingestion is a potent stimulator of skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS). However, older adults demonstrate resistance to anabolic stimuli. Some evidence has demonstrated that a larger acute protein dose is required in older compared to younger adults to elicit the same synthetic [...] Read more.
Protein ingestion is a potent stimulator of skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS). However, older adults demonstrate resistance to anabolic stimuli. Some evidence has demonstrated that a larger acute protein dose is required in older compared to younger adults to elicit the same synthetic response, suggesting that older adults should be consuming higher habitual dietary protein to optimise muscle mass. However, limited research has explored dietary habits in different age groups or the relationship between habitual dietary intake and mechanistic physiological parameters associated with muscle mass and function. This work investigated the effect of habitual dietary intake in young (n = 10, 25.9 (3.2y)) and older (n = 16, 70.2 (3.2y)) community-dwelling adults (16:10 male: female) on physiological muscle parameters. Dietary intake was assessed using four-day diet diaries. Post-absorptive MPS and MPS responses to feeding (4.25x basal metabolic rate; 16% protein) were determined in muscle biopsies of the m. vastus lateralis via stable isotope tracer ([1, 2−13C2]-leucine) infusions with mass-spectrometric analyses. Body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Whole body strength was assessed via 1-repetition maximum assessments. No significant differences in habitual dietary intake (protein, fat, carbohydrate and leucine as g.kgWBLM−1.day−1) were observed between age groups. Whole-body lean mass (61.8 ± 9.9 vs. 49.8 ± 11.9 kg, p = 0.01) and knee-extensor strength (87.7 ± 28.3 vs. 56.8 ± 16.4 kg, p = 0.002) were significantly higher in young adults. Habitual protein intake (g.kg−1.day−1) was not associated with whole-body lean mass, upper-leg lean mass, whole-body strength, knee-extensor strength, basal MPS or fed-state MPS across both age groups. These findings suggest that differences in muscle mass and strength parameters between youth and older age are not explained by differences in habitual dietary protein intake. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to fully explore these relationships and inform on interventions to mitigate sarcopenia development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Metabolism in Ageing)
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