Special Issue "Vitamin A and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Corrine K Hanson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Allied Health Professions, University of Nebraska Medical Center 984045 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-4045, USA
Interests: maternal–fetal nutrient interaction; the effects of omega-3 fatty acids against adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ann Anderson Berry
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 981205 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-1205, USA
Interests: vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, fatty acids, developmental origins of disease, maternal- child health, neonatal outcomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vitamin A and carotenoids, as essential nutrients, dietary supplements, and pharmaceutical interventions, have been widely investigated over the past few decades. A growing volume of research in the field points to retinoids and carotenoids as key players in human health. However, significant challenges in complexity and confounding factors have led to variations, inconsistencies, and controversies on the study outcomes of retinoids and carotenoids that remain to be clarified. Especially lacking are intake recommendations to encourage adequate intake of carotenoids to promote health, as intakes have been demonstrated to be low in several populations. Recent advances in analytical technology (such as “omics” approaches) and integrated experimental approaches have allowed us to more comprehensively and accurately elucidate the biological effects of retinoids and carotenoids. This Special Issue of Nutrients is intended to highlight some of the recent vitamin A and carotenoid studies that demonstrate their impact on human health over the life course.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Corrine K Hanson
Prof. Dr. Ann Anderson Berry
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vitamin A
  • retinoid
  • carotenoid
  • nutrition
  • human health
  • life course

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Communication
Night Blindness in Cystic Fibrosis: The Key Role of Vitamin A in the Digestive System
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1876; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11081876 - 13 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2387
Abstract
Vitamin A is a fundamental micronutrient that regulates various cellular patterns. Vitamin A deficiency (VAT) is a worldwide problem and the primary cause of nocturnal blindness especially in low income countries. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a known risk factor of VAD because of [...] Read more.
Vitamin A is a fundamental micronutrient that regulates various cellular patterns. Vitamin A deficiency (VAT) is a worldwide problem and the primary cause of nocturnal blindness especially in low income countries. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a known risk factor of VAD because of liposoluble vitamin malabsorption due to pancreatic insufficiency. We describe a case of a 9-year-old girl who experienced recurrent episodes of nocturnal blindness due to profound VAD. This little girl is paradigmatic for the explanation of the key role of the gut–liver axis in vitamin A metabolism. She presents with meconium ileus at birth, requiring intestinal resection that led to a transient intestinal failure with parenteral nutrition need. In addition, she suffered from cholestatic liver disease due to CF and intestinal failure-associated liver disease. The interaction of pancreatic function, intestinal absorption and liver storage is fundamental for the correct metabolism of vitamin A. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin A and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Quantification of Lutein + Zeaxanthin Presence in Human Placenta and Correlations with Blood Levels and Maternal Dietary Intake
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 134; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11010134 - 10 Jan 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2235
Abstract
Lutein + zeaxanthin (L + Z) are carotenoids recognized in eye health, but less is known about their status during pregnancy. While quantified in maternal and umbilical cord blood, they have never been analyzed in placenta. The purpose of this study is to [...] Read more.
Lutein + zeaxanthin (L + Z) are carotenoids recognized in eye health, but less is known about their status during pregnancy. While quantified in maternal and umbilical cord blood, they have never been analyzed in placenta. The purpose of this study is to quantify combined L + Z concentrations in human placenta and correlate with levels in maternal dietary intake, maternal serum, and umbilical cord blood. The proportions of combined L + Z were compared within diet, placenta, maternal serum, and umbilical cord blood among additional carotenoids (lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene). This Institutional Review Boardapproved cross-sectional study enrolled 82 mother-infant pairs. Placenta, maternal serum, and umbilical cord blood samples were analyzed for carotenoids concentrations. Mothers completed a food frequency questionnaire and demographic/birth outcome data were collected. L + Z were present in placenta, median 0.105 micrograms/gram (mcg/g) and were significantly correlated with maternal serum (r = 0.57; p < 0.001), umbilical cord blood levels (r = 0.49; p = 0.001), but not dietary intake (p = 0.110). L + Z were the most prevalent in placenta (49.1%) umbilical cord blood (37.0%), but not maternal serum (18.6%) or dietary intake (19.4%). Rate of transfer was 16.0%, the highest of all carotenoids. Conclusively, L + Z were identified as the two most prevalent in placenta. Results highlight unique roles L + Z may play during pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin A and Human Health)
Article
Status of Retinoids and Carotenoids and Associations with Clinical Outcomes in Maternal-Infant Pairs in Nigeria
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1286; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu10091286 - 12 Sep 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2060
Abstract
Vitamin A is an essential nutrient in pregnancy, and other carotenoids have been independently associated with maternal-infant outcomes. The objective of this study was to quantify the status of vitamin A and carotenoids in Nigerian maternal-infant pairs at delivery, compare these to a [...] Read more.
Vitamin A is an essential nutrient in pregnancy, and other carotenoids have been independently associated with maternal-infant outcomes. The objective of this study was to quantify the status of vitamin A and carotenoids in Nigerian maternal-infant pairs at delivery, compare these to a cohort from a developed nation, and determine the impact on clinical outcomes. Maternal and cord blood samples were collected in 99 Nigerian mother-infant pairs. Concentrations of lutein + zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotenes, and retinol were measured using HPLC. Descriptive statistics were calculated and Spearman coefficients were used to assess correlations between maternal and cord measurements; Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare median plasma values between dichotomous variables. Linear regression models were used to adjust for relevant confounders. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Thirty-five percent of mothers had plasma retinol concentrations ≤0.70 µmol/L; 82% of infants had plasma retinol concentrations ≤0.70 µmol/L at delivery. Maternal and infant concentrations of vitamin A compounds were highly correlated and were associated with newborn growth and Apgar scores. Despite plasma concentrations of pro-vitamin A carotenoids higher than those reported in other populations, pregnant Nigerian women have a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency. As vitamin A related compounds are modifiable by diet, future research determining the clinical impact of these compounds is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin A and Human Health)
Back to TopTop