Special Issue "Nutrition and Women Bone Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition in Women".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 November 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jose M. Moran
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Metabolic Bone Diseases Research Group, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: genetics of bone density; nutrition and women bone health; polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and women bone health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue "Nutrition and Women Bone Health" is to focus on the relevance of nutrition as a key element that has the potential to reduce bone loss or fracture risk.

Specifically, the objective is to bring to the body knowledge about the role that intake of certain nutrients such as calcium, vitamin D, proteins, vitamins, minerals or polyunsaturated fatty acid may have on the bone health of women at different stages of life. The impact that these and other nutrients may have on the progression of different diseases and their relationship to women's bone health will also be of interest.

Studies that deepen the understanding of the relationship between genetics and nutrient intake are especially welcome in the context of women's bone health.

In this Special Issue, we aim to address these fascinating areas, which are the major ongoing challenges in women's bone health research and practice.

Prof. Dr. Jose M. Moran
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrigenetics
  • Women’s health
  • Bone mineral density
  • Diet
  • Fracture
  • Menopause
  • Osteoporosis
  • Calcium
  • Dairy
  • Protein intake
  • Vitamin D

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effect of Vitamin E Supplement on Bone Turnover Markers in Postmenopausal Osteopenic Women: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4226; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13124226 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 515
Abstract
Vitamin E is a strong anti-oxidative stress agent that affects the bone remodeling process. This study evaluates the effect of mixed-tocopherol supplements on bone remodeling in postmenopausal osteopenic women. A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to measure the effect of mixed-tocopherol [...] Read more.
Vitamin E is a strong anti-oxidative stress agent that affects the bone remodeling process. This study evaluates the effect of mixed-tocopherol supplements on bone remodeling in postmenopausal osteopenic women. A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to measure the effect of mixed-tocopherol on the bone turnover marker after 12 weeks of supplementation. All 52 osteopenic postmenopausal women were enrolled and allocated into two groups. The intervention group received mixed-tocopherol 400 IU/day, while the control group received placebo tablets. Fifty-two participants completed 12 weeks of follow-up. Under an intention-to-treat analysis, vitamin E produced a significant difference in the mean bone resorption marker (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX)) compared with the placebo group (−0.003 ± 0.09 and 0.121 ± 0.15, respectively (p < 0.001)). In the placebo group, the CTX had increased by 35.3% at 12 weeks of supplementation versus baseline (p < 0.001), while, in the vitamin E group, there was no significant change of bone resorption marker (p < 0.898). In conclusion, vitamin E (mixed-tocopherol) supplementation in postmenopausal osteopenic women may have a preventive effect on bone loss through anti-resorptive activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Women Bone Health)
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Article
Effect of Vitamin D-Enriched Gouda-Type Cheese Consumption on Biochemical Markers of Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women in Greece
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 2985; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13092985 - 27 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Considering the role of bone metabolism in understanding the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of vitamin D-enriched cheese on the serum concentrations of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and certain bone remodeling biomarkers in postmenopausal [...] Read more.
Considering the role of bone metabolism in understanding the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of vitamin D-enriched cheese on the serum concentrations of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and certain bone remodeling biomarkers in postmenopausal women in Greece. In a randomised, controlled dietary intervention, 79 postmenopausal women (55–75 years old) were randomly allocated either to a control (CG: n = 39) or an intervention group (IG: n = 40), consuming 60 g of either non-enriched or vitamin D3-enriched Gouda-type cheese (5.7 μg of vitamin D3), respectively, daily and for eight weeks during the winter. The serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), PTH, bone formation (i.e., osteocalcin, P1NP) and bone resorption (i.e., TRAP-5b) biomarkers were measured. Consumption of the vitamin D-enriched cheese led to higher serum 25(OH)D concentrations of 23.4 ± 6.39 (p = 0.022) and 13.4 ± 1.35 (p < 0.001) nmol/L in vitamin D-insufficient women being at menopause for less and more than 5 years, respectively. In vitamin D-insufficient women that were less than 5 years at menopause, consumption of vitamin D-enriched cheese was also associated with lower serum PTH (Beta −0.63 ± 1.11; p < 0.001) and TRAP-5b (Beta −0.65 ± 0.23; p = 0.004) levels at follow-up, compared with the CG. The present study showed that daily intake of 5.7 μg of vitamin D through enriched cheese increased serum 25(OH)D concentrations, prevented PTH increase and reduced bone resorption in vitamin D-insufficient early postmenopausal women, thus reflecting a potential food-based solution for reducing the risk of bone loss occurring after menopause. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Women Bone Health)
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Article
Plasma Fatty Acids and Quantitative Ultrasound, DXA and pQCT Derived Parameters in Postmenopausal Spanish Women
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1454; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051454 - 25 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Different factors may contribute to the development of osteopenia or osteoporosis. Fatty acids are key nutrients for health, and a number of studies have reported an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and fatty acid intake. We aimed to investigate the relationships between [...] Read more.
Different factors may contribute to the development of osteopenia or osteoporosis. Fatty acids are key nutrients for health, and a number of studies have reported an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and fatty acid intake. We aimed to investigate the relationships between serum levels of different fatty acids and bone parameters determined by quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a sample of Spanish postmenopausal women. We enrolled a total of 301 postmenopausal women (median age 59 years; interquartile range (IQR) 7) in this study. All participants underwent full densitometric screening, including calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as plasma fatty acid measurement. After adjustment for potential confounders, plasma n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels correlated with BMD in the spine (r = 0.150; p = 0.014) and femoral neck (r = 0.143; p = 0.019). By multiple linear regression, an independent statistically significant positive relationship was observed between BMD in the spine and BMI (β = 0.288; p = 0.001) as well as total plasma n-3 PUFAs (β = 0.155; p = 0.009). The plasma n-3 PUFA level was also a significant and positive predictor of BMD at the femoral neck (β = 0.146; p = 0.009). Independent risk factors for low BMD (T-score ≤ 1) were determined by logistic regression analysis, and a relatively high level of plasma n-3 PUFAs (OR = 0.751; 95% CI 0.587-0.960, p = 0.022) was identified as a protective factor against low bone mass. In this single-center sample of Spanish postmenopausal women, we reported a significant positive and statistically independent association between BMD and plasma levels of n-3 PUFAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Women Bone Health)
Article
Association of Dietary Total Antioxidant Capacity with Bone Mass and Osteoporosis Risk in Korean Women: Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2011
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1149; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13041149 - 31 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1001
Abstract
Antioxidant intake has been suggested to be associated with a reduced osteoporosis risk, but the effect of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) on bone health and the risk of osteoporosis remains unclear. We aimed to assess the hypothesis that dietary TAC is positively [...] Read more.
Antioxidant intake has been suggested to be associated with a reduced osteoporosis risk, but the effect of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) on bone health and the risk of osteoporosis remains unclear. We aimed to assess the hypothesis that dietary TAC is positively associated with bone mass and negatively related to the risk of osteoporosis in Korean women. This cross-sectional study was performed using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Dietary TAC was estimated using task automation and an algorithm with 24-h recall data. In total, 8230 pre- and postmenopausal women were divided into four groups according to quartiles of dietary TAC. Dietary TAC was negatively associated with the risk of osteoporosis (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–0.99; p-value = 0.045) in postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. Dietary TAC was positively associated with bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density of the femoral neck and lumbar spine in postmenopausal women and BMC of the total femur and lumbar spine in premenopausal women. Our study suggests that dietary TAC is inversely associated with the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and positively associated with bone mass in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Women Bone Health)
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Review

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Review
Botanicals in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1609; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051609 - 11 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by reduced bone mass and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture leading to bone fragility and an increased risk of fractures. Conventional anti-osteoporotic pharmaceutics are effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of osteoporosis, however they are associated [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by reduced bone mass and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture leading to bone fragility and an increased risk of fractures. Conventional anti-osteoporotic pharmaceutics are effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of osteoporosis, however they are associated with various side effects that push many women into seeking botanicals as an alternative therapy. Traditional folk medicine is a rich source of bioactive compounds waiting for discovery and investigation that might be used in those patients, and therefore botanicals have recently received increasing attention. The aim of this review of literature is to present the comprehensive information about plant-derived compounds that might be used to maintain bone health in perimenopausal and postmenopausal females. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Women Bone Health)
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