Special Issue "Bone Biomechanics: Diseases, Treatment and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of Osteology (ISSN 2673-4036).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Redha Taiar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomechanics is the discipline concerned by the application of the tools, methods and formalisms of mechanics and automation aiming to study human movement. By dealing specifically with the biological aspects of humans in motion, this discipline concerns the kinematic, mechanical and control aspects of posture and movement. This discipline promotes a multifactorial approach that allows for an infinity of possible solutions to be envisaged for each motion and each posture, and thus contributes to the understanding of human mechanics. Biomechanics permit the estimation of human capacities by using the principles of mathematics, functional anatomy and mechanics to explore and understand biological problems. The advantage of this discipline is to understand the musculoskeletal system in order to improve its potential. Taking into account personal factors offers the possibility to choose a particular solution allowing for the optimization of human mechanics. The aim of this Special Issue is to quantify the methodological advances in osteology in clinical situations. This Special Issue is concerned with studying and analyzing biomechanical contributions, bone diseases—including fractures—the interactions between bone and other organ systems, including cartilage, muscle, neuron, joints and spine, bone biomaterials and prostheses.

Prof. Dr. Redha Taiar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Osteology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Influence of Gender on Occurrence of Aseptic Loosening and Recurrent PJI after Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty
Osteology 2021, 1(2), 92-104; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/osteology1020010 - 17 May 2021
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Abstract
Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a common yet severe complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy are obligatory to achieve successful, infection-free outcome. Compared to the outcomes after primary TKA, prosthesis failure rates are drastically increased after PJI-dependent [...] Read more.
Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a common yet severe complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy are obligatory to achieve successful, infection-free outcome. Compared to the outcomes after primary TKA, prosthesis failure rates are drastically increased after PJI-dependent revision surgery. Recurrent PJI and aseptic loosening are the most common reasons for prosthesis failure after revision TKA. An open question is the influence of the patients’ gender on long-term prosthesis survival after revision surgery. Additionally, it is unknown whether gender-related parameters and risk factors or differences in treatment are responsible for potential differences in outcome after revision arthroplasty. Patients and Methods: In this report, 109 patients that received TKA revision surgery due to PJI were retrospectively analyzed. We used clinical, paraclinical and radiological examinations to study the influence of gender on the long-term complications aseptic loosening and recurrent PJI after PJI-dependent revision arthroplasty. Results: While overall prosthesis failure rates and risk of recurrent PJI did not differ between genders, the long-term risk of aseptic loosening was significantly elevated in female patients. Postoperative coronal alignment was significantly more varus for women later diagnosed with aseptic loosening. Besides coronal alignment, no gender-dependent differences in clinical presentation or treatment were observed. Conclusions: Female patients displayed a significantly increased risk for aseptic loosening after PJI-dependent revision TKA. The observed gender-dependent differences in long-term outcome in our study support theories surrounding the role of bone metabolism in the development of aseptic loosening. Our data suggest that further research on a female design for PJI-dependent revision prostheses is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Biomechanics: Diseases, Treatment and Rehabilitation)
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Brief Report
Bone and Joint Infections in Children and Adolescents in Luanda, Angola
Osteology 2021, 1(2), 80-85; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/osteology1020008 - 19 Apr 2021
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Abstract
We reviewed the characteristics of children hospitalized for bone and joint infections in Luanda, Angola. In a retrospective chart review of 45 patients with childhood osteomyelitis or septic arthritis, 51% of the patients had sickle cell disease, and these patients presented with lower [...] Read more.
We reviewed the characteristics of children hospitalized for bone and joint infections in Luanda, Angola. In a retrospective chart review of 45 patients with childhood osteomyelitis or septic arthritis, 51% of the patients had sickle cell disease, and these patients presented with lower hemoglobin and needed blood transfusion more frequently (p < 0.05). Out of all patients, 64% underwent surgical procedures; a pathological fracture occurred in 31% of the patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Biomechanics: Diseases, Treatment and Rehabilitation)
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