Special Issue "Platelet Rich Plasma and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Orthobiologics Therapy – From Basic Science to Clinical Application"

A special issue of Osteology (ISSN 2673-4036).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jan Zabrzyński
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Guest Editor
1. Department of General Orthopaedics, Musculoskeletal Oncology and Trauma Surgery, University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
2. Department of Orthopaedics, Orvit Clinic, Citomed Healthcare Center, 87-100 Torun, Poland
3. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, 87-100 Toruń, Poland
Interests: arthroscopy; prosthesis; foot deformities; tendons disorders
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Prof. Dr. Gazi Huri
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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hacettepe Universitesi, 06800 Ankara, Turkey
Interests: orthopaedics
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Prof. Dr. Maciej Gagat
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Guest Editor
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, 87-100 Toruń, Poland
Interests: cytoskeleton; cell adhesion; cell-cell junctions; cell migration; endothelial dysfunction; cell death; cancer biomarkers
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is devoted to presenting new trends of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) application in musculoskeletal disorders with regard to basic mechanisms and also histopathological, radiological, and clinical implications. Our understanding of PRP and MSC application on microscopic tissue alterations is still insufficient, and it may be the key to gaining knowledge about the complete recovery of musculoskeletal diseases. Likewise, an increasing number of studies have revealed functional improvements after this therapy. However, histopathological and radiological implications are usually deficiently presented. Thus, there is a need for continued progress in PRP and MSC research, validation of PRP and MSC preparation protocols, and correlation with histopathological changes in musculoskeletal pathologies.

Finally, all papers on novel clinical applications of PRP and MSCs, also in combination with other bioactive molecules, in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are welcome, as are basic science and radiological studies.

Dr. Jan Zabrzyński
Prof. Dr. Gazi Huri
Prof. Dr. Maciej Gagat
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Osteology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • PRP
  • tendinopathy
  • rotator cuff
  • orthobiology
  • inflammation
  • therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Chondrogenic Potential of Dental-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Osteology 2021, 1(3), 149-174; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/osteology1030016 - 15 Sep 2021
Viewed by 403
Abstract
The field of tissue engineering has revolutionized the world in organ and tissue regeneration. With the robust research among regenerative medicine experts and researchers, the plausibility of regenerating cartilage has come into the limelight. For cartilage tissue engineering, orthopedic surgeons and orthobiologists use [...] Read more.
The field of tissue engineering has revolutionized the world in organ and tissue regeneration. With the robust research among regenerative medicine experts and researchers, the plausibility of regenerating cartilage has come into the limelight. For cartilage tissue engineering, orthopedic surgeons and orthobiologists use the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) of various origins along with the cytokines, growth factors, and scaffolds. The least utilized MSCs are of dental origin, which are the richest sources of stromal and progenitor cells. There is a paradigm shift towards the utilization of dental source MSCs in chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. Dental-derived MSCs possess similar phenotypes and genotypes like other sources of MSCs along with specific markers such as dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein (DMP) -1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and STRO-1. Concerning chondrogenicity, there is literature with marginal use of dental-derived MSCs. Various studies provide evidence for in-vitro and in-vivo chondrogenesis by dental-derived MSCs. With such evidence, clinical trials must be taken up to support or refute the evidence for regenerating cartilage tissues by dental-derived MSCs. This article highlights the significance of dental-derived MSCs for cartilage tissue regeneration. Full article
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