Special Issue "Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) and Biopharmaceutics (PBBM) Modeling"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Matilde Merino-Sanjuán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Parasitology, School of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: pharmacokinetics; biopharmaceutics; bioavailability; oral absorption
Dr. Virginia Merino Sanjuán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Parasitology, School of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: pharmacokinetics; biopharmaceutics; oral absorption; topical formulations; in vitro release
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Victor Mangas Sanjuán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Parasitology, School of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: pharmacokinetics; biopharmaceutics; oral absorption; dissolution methods
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling as a valuable tool for model informed drug discovery and development process, gaining recognition by the main regulatory authorities for drug approval because of their strength in data integration, mechanistic perspective and superior predictive power. Physiologically based biopharmaceutic (PBBM) models cover a recent field of research by the integration of in vitro dissolution experiments into PBPK models to predict the behaviour of the oral formulation in vivo and verifying whether the dissolution method of the pharmaceutical product is biopredictive or clinically relevant. Both model-informed strategies (PBPK and PBBM) contribute to optimise the drug development and use of medicines.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight recent advances in all aspects relevant to PBPK and PBBM modelling from the early drug discovery to beyond phase III clinical trials as well as its application in the clinic aimed at achieving an optimal dosage regimen. Additionally, regulatory and academic applications showing the impact in drug’s approval and solving theoretical aspects using PBPK or PBBM models are also welcome.

Dr. Matilde Merino-Sanjuán
Dr. Virginia Merino Sanjuán
Dr. Victor Mangas Sanjuán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling
  • physiologically based biopharmaceutic modeling
  • oral absorption
  • clinically relevant dissolution specifications
  • dissolution modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Network for the Prediction of CYP1A2 and CYP2C19 Drug–Drug–Gene Interactions with Fluvoxamine, Omeprazole, S-mephenytoin, Moclobemide, Tizanidine, Mexiletine, Ethinylestradiol, and Caffeine
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(12), 1191; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics12121191 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1432
Abstract
Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-recognized method for quantitatively predicting the effect of intrinsic/extrinsic factors on drug exposure. However, there are only few verified, freely accessible, modifiable, and comprehensive drug–drug interaction (DDI) PBPK models. We developed a qualified whole-body PBPK DDI network [...] Read more.
Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-recognized method for quantitatively predicting the effect of intrinsic/extrinsic factors on drug exposure. However, there are only few verified, freely accessible, modifiable, and comprehensive drug–drug interaction (DDI) PBPK models. We developed a qualified whole-body PBPK DDI network for cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP2C19 and CYP1A2 interactions. Template PBPK models were developed for interactions between fluvoxamine, S-mephenytoin, moclobemide, omeprazole, mexiletine, tizanidine, and ethinylestradiol as the perpetrators or victims. Predicted concentration–time profiles accurately described a validation dataset, including data from patients with genetic polymorphisms, demonstrating that the models characterized the CYP2C19 and CYP1A2 network over the whole range of DDI studies investigated. The models are provided on GitHub (GitHub Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA), expanding the library of publicly available qualified whole-body PBPK models for DDI predictions, and they are thereby available to support potential recommendations for dose adaptations, support labeling, inform the design of clinical DDI trials, and potentially waive those. Full article
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Review

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Review
Current Evidence, Challenges, and Opportunities of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of Atorvastatin for Decision Making
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(5), 709; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics13050709 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 617
Abstract
Atorvastatin (ATS) is the gold-standard treatment worldwide for the management of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular diseases associated with dyslipidemia. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been positioned as a valuable tool for the characterization of complex pharmacokinetic (PK) processes and its extrapolation [...] Read more.
Atorvastatin (ATS) is the gold-standard treatment worldwide for the management of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular diseases associated with dyslipidemia. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been positioned as a valuable tool for the characterization of complex pharmacokinetic (PK) processes and its extrapolation in special sub-groups of the population, leading to regulatory recognition. Several PBPK models of ATS have been published in the recent years, addressing different aspects of the PK properties of ATS. Therefore, the aims of this review are (i) to summarize the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics involved in the time-course of ATS, and (ii) to evaluate the major highlights and limitations of the PBPK models of ATS published so far. The PBPK models incorporate common elements related to the physicochemical aspects of ATS. However, there are important differences in relation to the analyte evaluated, the type and effect of transporters and metabolic enzymes, and the permeability value used. Additionally, this review identifies major processes (lactonization, P-gp contribution, ATS-Ca solubility, simultaneous management of multiple analytes, and experimental evidence in the target population), which would enhance the PBPK model prediction to serve as a valid tool for ATS dose optimization. Full article
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