Special Issue "New Developments in Pediatric Drug Formulations"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Pharmacy and Formulation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lidwien Marieke Hanff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: drug formulations; pediatrics; pediatric oncology; extemporaneous preparation; drug administration
Dr. Nikoletta Fotaki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling; in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVC); drug absorption; biopharmaceutics; precision medicines; in vitro dissolution-biorelevant/ compendial methods; dissolution imaging; biowaivers; pharmacometrics; animal models; formulation development; poor solubility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A well-designed pediatric drug formulation is a vital part of drug treatment. The compliance of (young) children depends heavily on the acceptability of the (oral) formulation, which will in turn be determined by factors such as taste and the texture of the dosage form. Drug safety is also an important issue in pharmacotherapy, and dosage errors can be easily made when a drug formulation is not well adjusted to the patient. In daily practice, extemporaneously prepared drug formulations or manipulation by caregivers are still common practice, and quality issues have to be described.

All these aspects have shifted the focus to the development of new drug formulations that are suitable for use in pediatrics, such as 3D printing, minitablets, and oromucosal films.  In this issue, new developments are described.

Dr. Lidwien Marieke Hanff
Dr. Nikoletta Fotaki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • pediatrics
  • drug formulation
  • 3D printing
  • minitablet
  • oromucosal film

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Acceptability of Mebendazole Chewable Tablet in Children Aged 2 to 4 Years in Peru
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(1), 27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics14010027 - 23 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) is among the most common of parasitic infections, affecting vulnerable populations in tropical/subtropical areas globally. In endemic countries, children, a high-risk population, require treatment and preventive interventions. Mebendazole, a WHO-recommended medicine, originally formulated as a tablet that was often crushed [...] Read more.
Soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) is among the most common of parasitic infections, affecting vulnerable populations in tropical/subtropical areas globally. In endemic countries, children, a high-risk population, require treatment and preventive interventions. Mebendazole, a WHO-recommended medicine, originally formulated as a tablet that was often crushed for administration to young children unable to swallow it, was reformulated as a chewable tablet. Acceptability is a key aspect for treatment effectiveness in pediatrics. Herein, we used a validated data-driven approach to investigate the acceptability of the 500-mg mebendazole chewable tablet in children aged 2 to 4 years in Peru. Observer-reported outcomes were collected for 182 medicine intakes. Acceptability was scored using the acceptability reference framework: a three-dimensional map juxtaposing “positively accepted” and “negatively accepted” profiles. Results found that the 500-mg mebendazole chewable tablet was classified as “positively accepted” in children aged 2 to 4 years. Acceptability increased with age and some acceptability issue remain for the younger children. Nevertheless, this formulation was considerably better accepted than the conventional tablets regardless of treatment in young children. This chewable formulation appears to be an appropriate alternative to the hard tablet of mebendazole for treatment of STH and preventive interventions in children aged 2 to 4 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Pediatric Drug Formulations)
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Article
Quantification of Fluid Volume and Distribution in the Paediatric Colon via Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(10), 1729; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics13101729 - 19 Oct 2021
Viewed by 541
Abstract
Previous studies have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify the fluid in the stomach and small intestine of children, and the stomach, small intestine and colon of adults. This is the first study to quantify fluid volumes and distribution using MRI in [...] Read more.
Previous studies have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify the fluid in the stomach and small intestine of children, and the stomach, small intestine and colon of adults. This is the first study to quantify fluid volumes and distribution using MRI in the paediatric colon. MRI datasets from 28 fasted (aged 0–15 years) and 18 fluid-fed (aged 10–16 years) paediatric participants were acquired during routine clinical care. A series of 2D- and 3D-based software protocols were used to measure colonic fluid volume and localisation. The paediatric colon contained a mean volume of 22.5 mL ± 41.3 mL fluid, (range 0–167.5 mL, median volume 0.80 mL) in 15.5 ± 17.5 discreet fluid pockets (median 12). The proportion of the fluid pockets larger than 1 mL was 9.6%, which contributed to 94.5% of the total fluid volume observed. No correlation was detected between all-ages and colonic fluid volume, nor was a difference in colonic fluid volumes observed based on sex, fed state or age group based on ICH-classifications. This study quantified fluid volumes within the paediatric colon, and these data will aid and accelerate the development of biorelevant tools to progress paediatric drug development for colon-targeting formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Pediatric Drug Formulations)
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