Special Issue "Learn from Plant Toxins and Phycotoxins: Impacts‎ and Application"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vitor Manuel Oliveira Vasconcelos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4069-007 Porto, Portugal
2. CIIMAR/CIMAR, Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos, s/n, 4450-208 Porto, Portugal
Interests: cyanobacteria; toxins; cyanotoxins; marine biotechnology; secondary metabolites; cyanobacterial blooms; ecotoxicology; environmental contamination
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Alexandre M. Campos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR)
Interests: marine toxins; ecotoxicology; exposure routes and risk assessment of marine toxins; proteomics of marine invertebrates
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marisa Freitas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Environmental Health, School of Health, Polytechnic Institute of Porto. Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 400, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
2. CIIMAR/CIMAR, Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto. Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos, s/n, 4450-208 Porto, Portugal
Interests: cyanotoxins; phycotoxins; toxicological effects of plant toxins; toxicological effects of phycotoxins; agricultural plants; food safety and quality; health risk assessment; environmental health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and anthropogenic pressure force plants to adapt to critical conditions, which may foster the increased occurrence of natural plant toxins as well as the toxin accumulation by plants due to environmental exposure, specially crops. Likewise, as a consequence of eutrophication and climate change the occurrence of phycotoxins has become increasingly widespread in aquatic ecosystems. Thus it is expected that in near future the safety and quality of feed and food products arising from plant and marine production systems can be affected. Furthermore, these can pose other emerging issues of public health and environmental concern. Plant toxins and phycotoxins are known to exert a variety of toxic effects to humans and other species, triggering several human diseases and compromising the subsistence of environmental ecosystems. On the other hand, as the specific targets of several natural plant toxins and phycotoxins have already been acknowledged, some of them may stand out as promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Nowadays, an attractive range of natural alkaloids, terpenoids, phenolic compounds and polypeptides are being investigated, for instance, by their pharmacological properties and clinical uses.

This Special Issue aims to provide a wide-ranging perspective of the impacts and applications of plant toxins and phycotoxins, by the assessment of its potential risks for public and environmental health and simultaneously by the identification and characterization of novel beneficial-natural compounds, creating resilience in front of the phenomena that currently whole world is facing. In this regard, this Special Issue it is open to review and original research articles that include the following topics:

  • Documentation of emergent plant toxins and phycotoxins occurrence due to climatic and anthropogenic pressure;
  • Acute and chronic toxic effects and mechanisms of action of plant toxins and phycotoxins in humans and other species;
  • Environmental fate of emergent plant toxins and phycotoxins;
  • Accumulation of toxins and phycotoxins in food and feed products from plant and marine origin and the risk assessment for public health, food production and environment;
  • Traits, nutritional value and quality of food and feed products exposed to plant toxins and phycotoxins;
  • Health impact assessment of guideline values proposals regarding plant toxins and phycotoxins in food and feed products;
  • Identification and characterization of plant toxins and phycotoxins with biotechnological value (e.g., treatment of human disorders, natural pesticides, food flavours, etc.), as well as the technologies and analytical tools applied (e.g., genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, bioinformatics, etc.).

Prof. Dr. Vitor Manuel Oliveira Vasconcelos
Dr. Alexandre M. Campos
Dr. Marisa Freitas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Toxicological effects of plant toxins
  • Toxicological effects of phycotoxins
  • Plant toxins biotechnology
  • Phycotoxins biotechnology
  • Agricultural Plants
  • Phycotoxins accumulation
  • Food safety
  • Food security
  • Risk assessment
  • Health impact assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Phytotoxic Potential and Phenolic Profile of Extracts from Scrophularia striata
Plants 2021, 10(1), 135; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plants10010135 - 11 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 893
Abstract
A large number of plants produce secondary metabolites known as allelochemicals that are capable of inhibiting the germination of competitive species. This process is known as allelopathy and is mediated by several classes of chemicals, among which phenolic compounds are the most frequent. [...] Read more.
A large number of plants produce secondary metabolites known as allelochemicals that are capable of inhibiting the germination of competitive species. This process is known as allelopathy and is mediated by several classes of chemicals, among which phenolic compounds are the most frequent. Thus, plant allelochemicals can be used to control weeds in agricultural systems. In the present work, we analyzed the phenolic profile and phytotoxic potential of different extracts (pure water or water: ethanol 50:50) from Scrophulariastriata plants that were collected from two ecological regions in Iran (Pahleh and Lizan). The total polyphenolic content (TPC), as evaluated by the Folin-Ciocolteau method, ranged from 28.3 mg/g in the aqueous extract obtained from the Lizan ecotype to 39.6 mg/g in the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the Pahleh ecotype. Moreover, HPLC analysis was aimed at determining the content of eight phenolic compounds, namely eugenol, rosmarinic acid, hesperetin, hesperedin, trans-ferulic acid, vanillin, and caffeic acid. According to the results, rosmarinic acid appeared to be the most abundant component. The phytotoxic activities of S.striata extracts were examined on the seed germination of a crop species, Lepidium sativum, and two weeds, Chenopodium album and Malva sylvestris. All extracts showed inhibitory effects on these species. The efficiency of these inhibitory effects depended on the type of plant species, origin, and concentration of extract. The highest phytotoxic activity was caused by approximately 1% concentration of extract. The most susceptible weed was M. sylvestris. The extracts that were obtained from the Pahleh ecotype, notably the hydroalcoholic ones, showed higher phytotoxicity against L. sativum, C. album and M. sylvestris. These results encourage further studies to support the use of S. striata as a source of bioherbicides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Learn from Plant Toxins and Phycotoxins: Impacts‎ and Application)
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