Special Issue "Advances in Bioprocess Technology"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesca Raganati
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Interests: fermentation; bioreactors; bioprocesse engineering; biomass conversion
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Alessandra Procentese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: fermentation; bioreactors; bioprocess engineering; biomass conversion
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue, “Advances in Bioprocess Technology”, will address the latest research in environmentally friendly bioprocess technology. Bioprocess technologies include bioenergy from lignocellulose materials, biomass gasification, biofuels/bioproducts production from agro-food waste, enzymatic bioprocess technology, food fermentation, bioprocesses optimization scale-up, and modeling.

Bioprocess technology is a vital part of biotechnology that deals with processes combining all living matter or its components with nutrients to produce specialty chemicals, reagents, and biotherapeutics. These processes form the backbone of translating discoveries of life sciences into useful industrial products. Different stages associated with bioprocess technology include substrates and media preparation, biocatalyst selection and optimization, volume production, downstream processing, purification, and final processing.

A bioprocess can commonly be divided in three stages:

  • Stage I: Upstream processing, which involves the preparation of liquid medium, separation of particulate and inhibitory chemicals from the medium, sterilization, air purification, etc. Upstream processes include the selection of a microbial strain characterized by the ability to synthesize a specific product with the desired commercial value. This strain is then subjected to improvement protocols to maximize its ability to synthesize economical amounts of the product.
  • Stage II: Fermentation, which involves the conversion of substrates to desired product with the help of biological agents such as microorganisms. Techniques for large-scale production of microbial products must provide both an optimum environment for the microbial synthesis of the desired product and be economically feasible on a large scale.
  • Stage III: Downstream processing, which involves the separation of cells from fermentation broth, purification and concentration of a desired product, and waste disposal or recycling.

Therefore, the objective of this Special Issue is to showcase the diversity and advances in research that contributes to developing effective bioprocess technologies.

Original papers on bioprocess technologies are solicited. We are particularly interested in receiving manuscripts that integrate biology and engineering research and/or experimental and theoretical studies. We invite researchers from all areas of bioengineering to submit manuscripts for this important Special Issue of Processes.

Dr. Francesca Raganati
Dr. Alessandra Procentese
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • upstream processing
  • fermentation
  • downstream processing
  • bioprocessing
  • biomass
  • bioreactors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
An Experimental Investigation of Water Vapor Condensation from Biofuel Flue Gas in a Model of Condenser, (2) Local Heat Transfer in a Calorimetric Tube with Water Injection
Processes 2021, 9(8), 1310; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9081310 - 29 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 336
Abstract
In order for the operation of the condensing heat exchanger to be efficient, the flue gas temperature at the inlet to the heat exchanger should be reduced so that condensation can start from the very beginning of the exchanger. A possible way to [...] Read more.
In order for the operation of the condensing heat exchanger to be efficient, the flue gas temperature at the inlet to the heat exchanger should be reduced so that condensation can start from the very beginning of the exchanger. A possible way to reduce the flue gas temperature is the injection of water into the flue gas flow. Injected water additionally moistens the flue gas and increases its level of humidity. Therefore, more favorable conditions are created for condensation and heat transfer. The results presented in the second paper of the series on condensation heat transfer indicate that water injection into the flue gas flow drastically changes the distribution of temperatures along the heat exchanger and enhances local total heat transfer. The injected water causes an increase in the local total heat transfer by at least two times in comparison with the case when no water is injected. Different temperatures of injected water mainly have a major impact on the local total heat transfer until almost the middle of the model of the condensing heat exchanger. From the middle part until the end, the heat transfer is almost the same at different injected water temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioprocess Technology)
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Article
Factors Affecting Detoxification of Softwood Enzymatic Hydrolysates Using Sodium Dithionite
Processes 2021, 9(5), 887; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9050887 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 454
Abstract
Conditioning of lignocellulosic hydrolysates with sulfur oxyanions, such as dithionite, is one of the most potent methods to improve the fermentability by counteracting effects of inhibitory by-products generated during hydrothermal pretreatment under acidic conditions. The effects of pH, treatment temperature, and dithionite dosage [...] Read more.
Conditioning of lignocellulosic hydrolysates with sulfur oxyanions, such as dithionite, is one of the most potent methods to improve the fermentability by counteracting effects of inhibitory by-products generated during hydrothermal pretreatment under acidic conditions. The effects of pH, treatment temperature, and dithionite dosage were explored in experiments with softwood hydrolysates, sodium dithionite, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Treatments with dithionite at pH 5.5 or 8.5 gave similar results with regard to ethanol productivity and yield on initial glucose, and both were always at least ~20% higher than for treatment at pH 2.5. Experiments in the dithionite concentration range 5.0–12.5 mM and the temperature range 23–110 °C indicated that treatment at around 75 °C and using intermediate dithionite dosage was the best option (p ≤ 0.05). The investigation indicates that selection of the optimal temperature and dithionite dosage offers great benefits for the efficient fermentation of hydrolysates from lignin-rich biomass, such as softwood residues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioprocess Technology)
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Article
An Experimental Investigation of Water Vapor Condensation from Biofuel Flue Gas in a Model of Condenser, (1) Base Case: Local Heat Transfer without Water Injection
Processes 2021, 9(5), 844; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9050844 - 12 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 453
Abstract
Waste heat recovery from flue gas based on water vapor condensation is an important issue as the waste heat recovery significantly increases the efficiency of the thermal power units. General principles for designing of this type of heat exchangers are known rather well; [...] Read more.
Waste heat recovery from flue gas based on water vapor condensation is an important issue as the waste heat recovery significantly increases the efficiency of the thermal power units. General principles for designing of this type of heat exchangers are known rather well; however, investigations of the local characteristics necessary for the optimization of those heat exchangers are very limited. Investigations of water vapor condensation from biofuel flue gas in the model of a vertical condensing heat exchanger were performed without and with water injection into a calorimetric tube. During the base-case investigations, no water was injected into the calorimetric tube. The results showed that the humidity and the temperature of inlet flue gas have a significant effect on the local and average heat transfer. For some regimes, the initial part of the condensing heat exchanger was not effective in terms of heat transfer because there the flue gas was cooled by convection until its temperature reached the dew point temperature. The results also showed that, at higher Reynolds numbers, there was an increase in the length of the convection prevailing region. After that region, a sudden increase was observed in heat transfer due to water vapor condensation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioprocess Technology)
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Review

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Review
Protein L—More Than Just an Affinity Ligand
Processes 2021, 9(5), 874; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9050874 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 535
Abstract
In the past 30 years, highly specific drugs, known as antibodies, have conquered the biopharmaceutical market. In addition to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), antibody fragments are successfully applied. However, recombinant production faces challenges. Process analytical tools for monitoring and controlling production processes are scarce [...] Read more.
In the past 30 years, highly specific drugs, known as antibodies, have conquered the biopharmaceutical market. In addition to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), antibody fragments are successfully applied. However, recombinant production faces challenges. Process analytical tools for monitoring and controlling production processes are scarce and time-intensive. In the downstream process (DSP), affinity ligands are established as the primary and most important step, while the application of other methods is challenging. The use of these affinity ligands as monitoring tools would enable a platform technology to monitor process steps in the USP and DSP. In this review, we highlight the current applications of affinity ligands (proteins A, G, and L) and discuss further applications as process analytical tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioprocess Technology)
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