Special Issue "Carbon Nanofibers: Preparation and Catalytic Performance"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. João Restivo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Laboratory LSRE-LCM, Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering – Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials, Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: environmental catalysis; carbon nanomaterials; nanocomposite coatings; structured catalysts; water treatment
Dr. Salomé Soares
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering - Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials (LSRE‐LCM), Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200‐465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis: environmental catalysis; air and water treatment; energy conversion; preparation and characterization of catalysts and materials: carbon materials and metal oxides; nanostructured materials; smart textiles
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon materials are widely used as catalyst or catalyst support throughout several chemical industries, offering ideal characteristics for many applications. Moreover, the modification of the surface of carbon materials to create or obtain chemical and textural surface properties able to achieve greater performances has been intensively explored. These efforts have created a plethora of methodologies relying on physical, chemical, and thermal approaches to carbon surface modification. Likewise, it is understood that besides the surface properties of carbon, the morphology and structure, at different scales, can also have an impact on their applications in catalysis. The rise of carbon nanomaterials has revolutionised the study of carbon in catalysis. While retaining many of the properties associated with more traditionally used materials such as activated carbon and carbon black, their unique structural, textural, morphological, and electronical properties have opened new possibilities in the design of catalysts with very high efficiencies and selectivities. This can generate technological solutions to usher in new applications in critical areas such as energy generation and storage, or environmental remediation and emission control.

This Special Issue on “Carbon Nanofibers: Preparation and Catalytic Performance” focuses on novel developments in the synthesis and modification of carbon nanofibers and their catalytic application. We invite high-quality submissions addressing current challenges in carbon nanofiber-based catalysts preparation, including but not limited to the following:

  • New processing methodologies for synthesis or modification for improved performance as catalysts and catalyst supports;
  • New or modified existing methodologies for synthesis and preparation with a focus on process sustainability;
  • Novel catalytic applications for carbon nanofibers, including immobilisation or scaling-up of processes previously limited to benchtop scales.

Dr. João Restivo
Dr. Salomé Soares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon nanofibers
  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • environmental catalysis
  • sustainable processes
  • catalyst immobilisation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Au-Pd Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Incorporated into Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) for Selective Oxidation of Alkenes and Alcohol
Processes 2020, 8(11), 1380; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr8111380 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 769
Abstract
Although supported bimetallic nanoparticles (Au-Pd NPs) demonstrate outstanding efficiency, challenges appear for carbon supported small and stable bimetallic nanoparticles used in liquid-phase reactions. In this work, Au-Pd NPs were supported on two types of carbon nanotubes: CNTs decorated covalently with carboxylic acid groups [...] Read more.
Although supported bimetallic nanoparticles (Au-Pd NPs) demonstrate outstanding efficiency, challenges appear for carbon supported small and stable bimetallic nanoparticles used in liquid-phase reactions. In this work, Au-Pd NPs were supported on two types of carbon nanotubes: CNTs decorated covalently with carboxylic acid groups (O-CNTs) and non-covalently with the conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) polymer (P-CNTs). The Au-Pd NPs were prepared using the sol immobilization approach on the functionalized CNTs, and the effect of the utilized functionalization method on the properties of the immobilized metallic nanoparticles and the performance of the nanocomposite catalysts was investigated. The fabricated nanocomposites were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The catalytic performance of Au-Pd/O-CNTs and Au-Pd/P-CNTs was exploited for the oxidation of both cyclooctene and benzyl alcohol. Oxidation and polymer decoration directly led to an enhancement in the performance of CNTs catalysts. The nanocomposite catalyst with oxidized CNTs (Au-Pd/O-CNTs) was also found to be much more efficient and robust than that with polymer decorated CNTs (Au-Pd/P-CNTs). The enhancement in the oxidation of both cyclooctene and benzyl alcohol on Au-Pd/O-CNTs is attributed to the well-dispersed and smaller Au-Pd NPs as active sites on the surface of O-CNTs as compared to the P-CNTs surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanofibers: Preparation and Catalytic Performance)
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Review

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Review
Processing Methods Used in the Fabrication of Macrostructures Containing 1D Carbon Nanomaterials for Catalysis
Processes 2020, 8(11), 1329; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr8111329 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
A large number of methodologies for fabrication of 1D carbon nanomaterials have been developed in the past few years and are extensively described in the literature. However, for many applications, and in particular in catalysis, a translation of the materials to a macro-structured [...] Read more.
A large number of methodologies for fabrication of 1D carbon nanomaterials have been developed in the past few years and are extensively described in the literature. However, for many applications, and in particular in catalysis, a translation of the materials to a macro-structured form is often required towards their use in practical operation conditions. This review intends to describe the available methods currently used for fabrication of such macro-structures, either already applied or with potential for application in the fabrication of macro-structured catalysts containing 1D carbon nanomaterials. A review of the processing methods used in the fabrication of macrostructures containing 1D sp2 hybridized carbon nanomaterials is presented. The carbon nanomaterials here discussed include single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and several types of carbon nanofibers (fishbone, platelet, stacked cup, etc.). As the processing methods used in the fabrication of the macrostructures are generally very similar for any of the carbon nanotubes or nanofibers due to their similar chemical nature (constituted by stacked ordered graphene planes), the review aggregates all under the carbon nanofiber (CNF) moniker. The review is divided into methods where the CNFs are synthesized already in the form of a macrostructure (in situ methods) or where the CNFs are previously synthesized and then further processed into the desired macrostructures (ex situ methods). We highlight in particular the advantages of each approach, including a (non-exhaustive) description of methods commonly described for in situ and ex situ preparation of the catalytic macro-structures. The review proposes methods useful in the preparation of catalytic structures, and thus a number of techniques are left out which are used in the fabrication of CNF-containing structures with no exposure of the carbon materials to reactants due to, for example, complete coverage of the CNF. During the description of the methodologies, several different macrostructures are described. A brief overview of the potential applications of such structures in catalysis is also offered herein, together with a short description of the catalytic potential of CNFs in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanofibers: Preparation and Catalytic Performance)
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