Special Issue "Biomass Processing and Conversion Systems, Volume II"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2022.
Related Special Issue: Biomass Processing and Conversion Systems

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Joanna Berlowska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Lodz University of Technology, Wolczanska 171/173, 90-924 Lodz, Poland
Interests: biomass utilization; sustainable development; green chemicals; yeast physiology; fermentation technologies; feed formulations
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable development, and in particular, rational waste management, constitutes a major challenge to contemporary industries. It is essential to utilize renewable resources, while preventing the wastage of intermediate products and ensuring the recycling of by-products. Utilization of renewable materials makes it possible to reduce the depletion of fossil resources and limit the adverse consequences of their processing. The valorization of the waste materials generated at different process stages would enable the economically viable production of many other compounds, at the same time reducing waste. An efficient way of recycling waste biomass is to use it as a substrate in biological processes.

A sustainable solution should also be consistent with the green chemistry concept, according to which processes should be designed and conducted to minimize hazards to the natural environment. Green chemistry implies the application of alternative ways of synthesizing chemical compounds and the optimization of process conditions, so as to increase selectivity and decrease waste.

This Special Issue focuses on recent developments in biomass (especially waste biomass: wood or forest residues, waste from food crops, horticulture, food processing, animal farming, or human waste from sewage plant), biological conversion, and valorization. Safely reusing waste/biomass should lead to its transformation into valuable compounds and materials; energy and fuels or platform chemicals.

Dr. Joanna Berlowska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • renewable resources
  • valorization of the waste materials
  • biomass hydrolysis
  • platform chemicals and their derivatives
  • bio-based energy and fuels

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Microwave Radiation Influence on Dairy Waste Anaerobic Digestion in a Multi-Section Hybrid Anaerobic Reactor (M-SHAR)
Processes 2021, 9(10), 1772; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9101772 - 02 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Whey is a primary by-product of dairy plants, and one that is often difficult to manage. As whey processing units are costly and complicated, only 15–20% of whey is recycled for use in the food industry. The difficulties in managing waste whey are [...] Read more.
Whey is a primary by-product of dairy plants, and one that is often difficult to manage. As whey processing units are costly and complicated, only 15–20% of whey is recycled for use in the food industry. The difficulties in managing waste whey are particularly pronounced for small, local dairy plants. One possible solution to this problem is to use advanced and efficient digesters. The aim of this study was to present an innovative multi-section hybrid anaerobic bioreactor (M-SHAR) design and to identify how microwave radiation heating (MRH) affects methane fermentation of liquid dairy waste (LDW) primarily composed of acid whey. The MRH reactor was found to perform better in terms of COD removal and biogas production compared with the convection-heated reactor. The heating method had a significant differentiating effect at higher organic load rates (OLRs). With OLRs ranging from 15 to 25 kgCOD∙m−3∙d−1, the M-SHAR with MRH ensured a 5% higher COD removal efficiency and 12–20% higher biogas yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Processing and Conversion Systems, Volume II)
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Article
Experimental Study on Hydrothermal Polymerization Catalytic Process Effect of Various Biomass through a Pilot Plant
Processes 2021, 9(5), 758; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9050758 - 26 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Through the previous study a hydrothermal polymerization (HTP)—a catalytic methodology for treating various biomass and organic wastes—has been developed on a lab scale with a 1 L reactor and the results published. The research work described herein aims to ensure that the catalytic [...] Read more.
Through the previous study a hydrothermal polymerization (HTP)—a catalytic methodology for treating various biomass and organic wastes—has been developed on a lab scale with a 1 L reactor and the results published. The research work described herein aims to ensure that the catalytic process is scalable for pilot and even commercial scale plants. A 1700 L binary reactor system has been built and the assumptions of a commercial scale plant that would have 10,000 to 20,000 L pressure vessels tested. The HTP catalytic biofuel process converts mono- and polysaccharides into a solid polymer fuel that is based on a furfuraldehyde ring system. The calorific value of the material obtained from the pilot plant is on the order of 27 MJ/kg and the material typically has low ash and fixed carbon content order of 48% which are about same as the lab results for various wood biomass feedstocks. Though a 1700 times scale up binary reactor system the scalability of the HTP catalytic methodology has been confirmed and the mass and energy balance of the binary reactor identified in order to provide fundamental data for commercial scale establishment in future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Processing and Conversion Systems, Volume II)
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