Special Issue "Cell and Tissue Manufacturing Processes"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tao Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Biological Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK
Interests: regenerative medicine; biochemical engineering; bioprocessing; synthetic biology; systems biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Pau Loke Show
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia, Broga Road, Semenyih 43500, Malaysia
Interests: bioprocessing from upstream to downstream; separation and purification technology; algae biorefinery engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (TERM) aims to apply the principles of engineering and life sciences to the manufacturing of bio-substitutes to restore, maintain, enhance, or replace failing human tissues or organs. Even though dramatic advances and developments have been made during the past 30 years, it is still a challenge to manufacture fully functional tissues. This is mainly due to several translational challenges: (1) the mechanistic understanding of the relationships among molecules, cells, tissues, and organs as a whole during tissue regeneration is limited, even though the recognition and incorporation of these relationships and the underpinning biological processes is an inherent characteristic of TERM; (2) there is no gold standard or generic procedure for cell and tissue culture, as a great amount of research efforts have been pursued to develop diverse media, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds, and cell and tissue culturing protocols; (3) significant scale-up challenges still exist in TERM, and new scale-up strategies based on thorough investigation of the infiltrated cells within the heterogeneous and anisotropic 3D scaffolds are urgently needed.

Insufficient understanding of cells cultured in 3D scaffolds and tissue formation is the core of these translational challenges in TERM. This Special Issue on “Cell and Tissue Manufacturing Processes” aims to curate novel advances in the investigation of the aforementioned relationships during tissue regeneration at small and/or large scale. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development of high-throughput 3D cell culture systems for the mechanistic insights of cell–cell and cell–scaffold interactions;
  • Development of small- and/or large-scale cell culture processes for gene and/or cell therapy;
  • Development of small- and/or large-scale processes to manufacture engineered tissues or organs for TERM;
  • Application of computational models for the simulation of cultured cells or tissues;
  • Development of bioreactor systems for cell and tissue manufacture at small or large scale;
  • Application of novel technologies for cell assessment during cell and tissue cultures.
Dr. Tao Sun
Dr. Pau Loke Show
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioprocess
  • tissue engineering
  • regenerative medicine
  • cell culture
  • tissue culture
  • mechanistic understanding
  • computational modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Culturing of Melanocytes from the Equine Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath
Processes 2021, 9(1), 177; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9010177 - 19 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Hair follicles harbor a heterogeneous regenerative cell pool and represent a putative low-to-non-invasively available source of stem cells. We previously reported a technology for culturing human melanocytes from the hair follicle outer root sheath (ORS) for autologous pigmentation of tissue engineered skin equivalents. [...] Read more.
Hair follicles harbor a heterogeneous regenerative cell pool and represent a putative low-to-non-invasively available source of stem cells. We previously reported a technology for culturing human melanocytes from the hair follicle outer root sheath (ORS) for autologous pigmentation of tissue engineered skin equivalents. This study translated the ORS technology to horses. We de-veloped a culture of equine melanocytes from the ORS (eMORS) from equine forelock hair follicles cultured by means of an analogue human hair follicle-based in vitro methodology. The procedure was adjusted to equine physiology by addition of equine serum to the culture medium. The hair follicles were isolated by macerating forelock skin rests, enzymatically digested and subjected to air-medium-interface cultivation method. The procedure resulted in differentiated equine melanocytes, which exhibited typical morphology, presence of melanosomes, expression of cytoskeleton proteins vimentin, α-SMA, Sox2, S100ß and tyrosinase as well as tyrosinase activity followed by production of melanin. According to all assessed parameters, eMORS could be ranked as partially melanotic melanocytes. The results of the study offer an experimental base for further insight into hair follicle biology in equine and for comparative studies of hair follicles across different species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell and Tissue Manufacturing Processes)
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Review

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Review
A Paradigm Shift in Tissue Engineering: From a Top–Down to a Bottom–Up Strategy
Processes 2021, 9(6), 935; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9060935 - 26 May 2021
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Abstract
Tissue engineering (TE) was initially designed to tackle clinical organ shortage problems. Although some engineered tissues have been successfully used for non-clinical applications, very few (e.g., reconstructed human skin) have been used for clinical purposes. As the current TE approach has not achieved [...] Read more.
Tissue engineering (TE) was initially designed to tackle clinical organ shortage problems. Although some engineered tissues have been successfully used for non-clinical applications, very few (e.g., reconstructed human skin) have been used for clinical purposes. As the current TE approach has not achieved much success regarding more broad and general clinical applications, organ shortage still remains a challenging issue. This very limited clinical application of TE can be attributed to the constraints in manufacturing fully functional tissues via the traditional top–down approach, where very limited cell types are seeded and cultured in scaffolds with equivalent sizes and morphologies as the target tissues. The newly proposed developmental engineering (DE) strategy towards the manufacture of fully functional tissues utilises a bottom–up approach to mimic developmental biology processes by implementing gradual tissue assembly alongside the growth of multiple cell types in modular scaffolds. This approach may overcome the constraints of the traditional top–down strategy as it can imitate in vivo-like tissue development processes. However, several essential issues must be considered, and more mechanistic insights of the fundamental, underpinning biological processes, such as cell–cell and cell–material interactions, are necessary. The aim of this review is to firstly introduce and compare the number of cell types, the size and morphology of the scaffolds, and the generic tissue reconstruction procedures utilised in the top–down and the bottom–up strategies; then, it will analyse their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges; and finally, it will briefly discuss the possible technologies that may overcome some of the inherent limitations of the bottom–up strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell and Tissue Manufacturing Processes)
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