Special Issue "Sustainable Water Treatment and Desalination with Membrane Distillation Technology"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Farzaneh Mahmoudi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Associate in Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, School of Engineering, RMIT University, 124 La Trobe St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
Interests: sustainable desalination and water treatment; membrane distillation; water–energy nexus; renewable energy systems; membrane-based power generation technologies
Prof. Dr. Aliakbar Akbarzadeh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Honorary Professor in Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, School of Engineering, RMIT University, 124 La Trobe St, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
Interests: renewable energy systems; sustainable desalination; water–energy nexus
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Potable water supplies have been one of the main concerns in many regions of the world, becoming more critical with shortages of surface water and groundwater, the worldwide increase in water consumption and the contamination and salinity of water resources. As a result, the demand for alternative water sources, including desalinated and recycled water, has increased in recent years. The main concerns with current desalination technologies are related to the sustainable running of the processes, which includes but is not limited to the energy driving the process, brine management, CO2 emissions and water-production costs. As a result, the development of more-sustainable desalination technologies, including less-energy-intensive processes with minimum environmental impact, is under investigation. Membrane distillation (MD), a thermal-based desalination process, can be run at atmospheric pressure and lower operating temperatures compared to traditional thermal desalination processes. It can be integrated with low-grade waste heat or solar energy sources. However, more investigation in terms of MD system design, new membrane materials and process optimization is required to minimize the energy consumption and environmental footprint of the process and enhance the quantity and quality of the produced permeate.

This Special Issue on “Sustainable Water Treatment and Desalination with Membrane Distillation Technology” seeks high-quality and novel work focusing on the latest advances in membrane distillation technology for sustainable water treatment and desalination applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The fabrication of novel membranes and advanced MD module engineering design in different configurations.
  • Creating hybrid MD systems by integration with conventional desalination technologies, for brine management and salt recovery purposes.
  • Prospects for an MD water desalination process with zero liquid discharge (ZLD).
  • The theoretical modelling and simulation of complex MD systems in different configurations.
  • Small-scale, stand-alone MD systems integrated with renewable energy sources for applications in remote areas.
  • Long-term MD system performance at large scales, integrated with sustainable energy sources or industrial waste heat.
  • MD membrane fouling and scaling issues: control and modelling.
  • The costs of water production with MD systems at small and large scales.

Dr. Farzaneh Mahmoudi
Prof. Dr. Aliakbar Akbarzadeh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable desalination
  • water treatment
  • membrane distillation
  • hybrid systems
  • brine management
  • numerical modeling
  • solar energy
  • waste heat
  • long-term performance
  • large-scale application

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Bispacer Multi-Stage Direct Contact Membrane Distillation System: Analytical and Experimental Study
Processes 2021, 9(8), 1297; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9081297 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 375
Abstract
A multi-staged direct contact membrane distillation (MDCMD) system is designed considering a novel bispacer configuration in the present study. The proposed bispacer DCMD, which has not been addressed in the literature to best of our knowledge, is considered with two purposes, including increasing [...] Read more.
A multi-staged direct contact membrane distillation (MDCMD) system is designed considering a novel bispacer configuration in the present study. The proposed bispacer DCMD, which has not been addressed in the literature to best of our knowledge, is considered with two purposes, including increasing mechanical stability and turbulence. As increasing turbulence leads to increasing Nusselt number, the bispacer MDCMD provides higher permeate flux. An analytical approach is considered using energy and mass balance correlation. The effect of bispacer and feed operating conditions, including feed temperature, feed flow rate, feed salinity, and the number of stages on permeate flux and salt rejection of the developed MDCMD, are examined both analytically and experimentally. The performance and sustainability of the developed system were investigated by analyzing the parameters, including thermal efficiency (η), gained output ratio (GOR), and temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). Full article
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Article
Confined Plunging Liquid Jets for Dilution of Brine from Desalination Plants
Processes 2021, 9(5), 856; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pr9050856 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 453
Abstract
Confined plunging jets are investigated as potential outfalls for the discharge of desalination brine. Compared to offshore submerged outfalls that rely on momentum to induce mixing, plunging jets released above the water surface utilize both momentum and negative buoyancy. Plunging jets also introduce [...] Read more.
Confined plunging jets are investigated as potential outfalls for the discharge of desalination brine. Compared to offshore submerged outfalls that rely on momentum to induce mixing, plunging jets released above the water surface utilize both momentum and negative buoyancy. Plunging jets also introduce air into the water column, which can reduce the possibility of hypoxic zones. In contrast to unconfined plunging jets, confined plunging jets include a confining tube, or downcomer, around the jet, which increases the penetration depth of the bubbles and can provide better aeration. However, the presence of this downcomer can hinder mixing with surrounding water. Therefore, laboratory measurements of dilution are reported here and compared to the dilution of unconfined plunging jets. In addition, qualitative observations of bubble penetration depth are also used to discuss aeration potential. For designs that increase the bubble penetration depth as compared to unconfined plunging jets, results show that dilution decreases as the depth of the downcomer is increased. However, it is shown that confined plunging jets can be designed with a short downcomer to provide higher dilution than unconfined jets. The effect of the diameter of downcomer on dilution is also investigated and a non-monotonic effect is observed. Full article
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