Special Issue "Religious Embodiments in South Asia"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Theologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. George Pati
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Theology Department, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383, USA
Interests: religions of South Asia; Hinduism; bhakti; body and religion; anthropology of religion; Malayalam language and Kerala history and culture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For this Special Issue of Religions, I am inviting articles discussing various religious embodiments in South Asia. This Special Issue focuses on the body as a place and medium of embodied religion in South Asia. The primary focus is to discuss bodies in various religious and regional contexts in South Asia. It adds to the ongoing discussion on religion and the body from various theories, methods, historical periods, religions, and regions. This Special Issue invites in-depth investigation of embodied religious practices and performances in various religions, regions, and texts grounded in original research. In particular, I seek articles drawing upon case studies, performances, rituals, or textual interpretations that provide embodied knowledge and that challenge the understanding of the body, enabling a reconceptualization of the body.

Dr. George Pati

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • body
  • embodied knowledge
  • place
  • medium
  • experience
  • rituals
  • performances
  • worship

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
When the Poison Is the Cure—Healing and Embodiment in Contemporary Śrīvidyā Tantra of the Lalitāmbikā Temple
Religions 2021, 12(8), 607; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel12080607 - 05 Aug 2021
Viewed by 837
Abstract
This paper discusses the healing practices of samayācāra Śrīvidyā, a Hindu Tantric tradition. This study is based on field research conducted in the Śrī Lalitāmbikā temple in Coimbatore, India. The tradition not only advocates inner ritualism, but also focuses on healing practices derived [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the healing practices of samayācāra Śrīvidyā, a Hindu Tantric tradition. This study is based on field research conducted in the Śrī Lalitāmbikā temple in Coimbatore, India. The tradition not only advocates inner ritualism, but also focuses on healing practices derived from Tantric sources. By using both emic and etic approaches, this paper attempts to show how the rituals and Śrīvidyā meditative practices became incorporated into this system of healing and well-being. A further aim of this paper is to indicate how various forms of embodiment and healing define the spiritual practice of Lalitāmbikā Śrīvidyā. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religious Embodiments in South Asia)
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