Special Issue "Constantinople and its Peripheries: The Mechanisms of Liturgical Byzantinisation"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Theologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stig R. Frøyshov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo, Oslo NO-0315, Norway
Interests: eastern christian liturgy; liturgy of jerusalem; byzantine liturgical history; palestino-byzantine horologion; greek hymnography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is devoted to the process of liturgical byzantinisation, which was the spread of liturgical traditions of Constantinople to other areas of the Byzantine world. After the loss of Eastern regions of the Empire, Constantinople increasingly stood forth as the primary ecclesiastical—and liturgical—centre of the East Roman or Byzantine Empire. Liturgical byzantinisation started seriously with the renaissance and expansion of the Empire, brought by the Macedonian dynasty, as central liturgical traditions gained global authority from the late ninth and tenth centuries onwards.

Liturgical byzantinisation is a fertile topic in the field of Byzantine liturgical studies today for several reasons. First, recent research has shed new light on the liturgical situation in Constantinople itself and, therefore, on the liturgy that was transmitted and the milieux of the centres from which it was spread: S. Parenti, “The Cathedral Rite of Constantinople: Evolution of a Local Tradition”, Orientalia Christiana Periodica, 77 (2011): 440–69; S. Frøyshov, “The Early History of the Hagiopolitan Daily Office in Constantinople: New Perspectives on the Formative Period of the Byzantine Rite”, Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75 (2020): 351-382.

Secondly, numerous liturgical sources from liturgical peripheries, reflecting liturgical byzantinisation, are waiting to be studied better or for the first time. These are manuscripts of Byzantine peripheries, such as the Middle East, the Caucasus (Georgia), South Italy, Slavic lands (Bulgaria, Serbia, Rus’ and Russia), as well as Byzantine areas, such as Mount Athos, written in any of the corresponding languages. Daniel Galadza has recently examined the liturgical byzantinisation of Jerusalem in Liturgy and Byzantinisation in Jerusalem (Oxford, 2018).

Thirdly, the complex but understudied relationship between liturgical centre and periphery is vital for understanding historical evolution. Liturgical byzantinisation, a prime case of the centre–periphery relationship, raises potent questions, such as the following: Which were the actual liturgical centres, and were they secular (patriarchal?) or monastic? Out of the liturgical diversity of the capital, which traditions were spread? To what extent did the peripheries modify central liturgical rites when adopting them? Did the peripheries continuously follow the evolution of the centre, or were they conservative peripheries preserving, unchanged, the received liturgy? Were there “sub-centres” in the peripheries, exercising a central authority in their own region? Was there also an opposite liturgical influence—a “Neo-Sabaite” influence from the Palestinian periphery to central Byzantine regions?

Dr. Stig R. Frøyshov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Eastern Christian liturgy
  • Byzantine liturgy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Kata Stichon Hymnography in the East Slavic Tradition
Religions 2022, 13(1), 40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel13010040 - 31 Dec 2021
Viewed by 173
Abstract
The kata stichon hymns are a peculiar genre of hymnography occurring as part of nocturnal prayer in early sources for the Byzantine Liturgy of the Hours. The use of these hymns in traditions on the Byzantine periphery remains in need of study. In [...] Read more.
The kata stichon hymns are a peculiar genre of hymnography occurring as part of nocturnal prayer in early sources for the Byzantine Liturgy of the Hours. The use of these hymns in traditions on the Byzantine periphery remains in need of study. In this paper, the authors identify kata stichon hymns translated into Church Slavonic found in early East Slavic Horologia as well as in later Slavonic collections of private prayer used in Russia up to the 17th century. The authors also identify hymns with no known Greek analogs, as well as hymns reflecting the kata stichon genre composed in Church Slavonic. The liturgical function of these hymns is studied and hypotheses are proposed for their origin and continued popularity in Russian nocturnal worship and private cell prayer. Full article
Article
The Source Value of Arabic Typikon-Manuscripts as Testimonials for the Byzantinization of the Melkites
Religions 2021, 12(11), 931; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel12110931 - 27 Oct 2021
Viewed by 517
Abstract
With the expansion of Islam, the patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria were divided from the Byzantine Empire. The Orthodox Christians there still defined themselves as Byzantine Orthodox and began to adapt their liturgical customs by adopting Byzantine liturgical books. When Greek was [...] Read more.
With the expansion of Islam, the patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria were divided from the Byzantine Empire. The Orthodox Christians there still defined themselves as Byzantine Orthodox and began to adapt their liturgical customs by adopting Byzantine liturgical books. When Greek was not understood any longer, they began to translate and copy their liturgical books, thereby creating their own branch of tradition, which is marked by multilingualism, reception of their own Bible tradition as well as the exclusion of “neo-martyrs” from their calendar of saints. Full article
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