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Exploring Planetary Environments with Remote Sensing Techniques

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Satellite Missions for Earth and Planetary Exploration".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 26 June 2024 | Viewed by 1421

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunications (DIET), Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: remote sensing; radar system; data processing; and sounder data analysis for planetary exploration

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Guest Editor
Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, Ithaca, NY, USA
Interests: radar signal processing; planetary science; radar; polarimetry; microwave remote sensing; astronomy and astrophysics; synthetic aperture radar; earth observation; satellite image processing

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Guest Editor
Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: planetary 3D mapping (e.g., moon, mars, asteroids) using photometry-based methods (photoclinometry, shape-from-shading); light scattering of planetary surfaces and atmospheres; remote sensing vision; 3D imaging and mapping; photometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Remote sensing techniques have been widely used to explore the planetary environments of our solar system. In recent years, empowered by the vast amount of data returned from missions carried out by different countries (the U.S., Europe, China, Japan, India, and many more), significant progress has been made in this field. Remote sensing tools and methodologies are of fundamental importance for researchers worldwide to better understand different planetary systems. For instance, observations made by Mars probes (Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Tianwen-1, etc.) have provided new insights into the geological history of the Red Planet, while observations by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter have revealed evidence of water ice on the Moon. Furthermore, the Juno mission to Jupiter has enabled detailed measurements of the planet's magnetic and gravitational fields, leading to a better understanding of its interior structure.

Against this backdrop, this Special Issue, titled “Exploring Planetary Environments with Remote Sensing Techniques”, aims to provide a platform for researchers to share their latest findings and ideas in this rapidly advancing field. The significance of this Special Issue lies in its potential to not only showcase cutting-edge research but also to stimulate further scientific progress and collaboration. By bringing together a diverse range of research topics and perspectives, this Special Issue hopes to contribute to a greater understanding of planetary environments and the development of more sophisticated remote sensing techniques.

The scope of the Special Issue covers a wide range of topics related to remote sensing techniques and planetary environments, including but not limited to:

  • Analysis of planetary atmospheres using remote sensing data;
  • Topographic and spectroscopic characterization of planetary surfaces;
  • Interpretation and modeling of remote sensing observations of planetary interiors;
  • Exploration of planetary magnetospheres and their interaction with the solar wind.

We welcome original research articles, reviews, and commentaries that contribute to our understanding of planetary environments through the use of remote sensing techniques. We hope that this Special Issue will serve as a valuable resource for researchers and students in this exciting and rapidly evolving field.

Dr. Marco Mastrogiuseppe
Dr. Valerio Poggiali
Dr. Wai-Chung Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • planetary remote sensing
  • planetary surfaces
  • planetary geology
  • planetary atmospheres
  • planetary 3D mapping
  • planetary magnetospheres
  • solar system

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 17537 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Analysis of the Vertical Interactions between Dust, Zonal Wind, and Migrating Diurnal Tide on Mars and the Role of Gravity Waves
by Jie Zhang, Zheng Sheng and Mingyuan He
Remote Sens. 2024, 16(11), 1904; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs16111904 - 25 May 2024
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Abstract
In the atmospheric system of Mars, vertical interactions are crucial, yet quantitative studies addressing this issue remain scarce. Based on simulations using the Mars PCM-LMDZ, we present the first frequency-domain quantitative analysis of the vertical interactions among Martian atmospheric dust, zonal circulation, and [...] Read more.
In the atmospheric system of Mars, vertical interactions are crucial, yet quantitative studies addressing this issue remain scarce. Based on simulations using the Mars PCM-LMDZ, we present the first frequency-domain quantitative analysis of the vertical interactions among Martian atmospheric dust, zonal circulation, and the migrating diurnal tide (DW1), employing Partial Directed Coherence (PDC) techniques to quantify the strength of associations between different variables. Our findings reveal a chain of influence where sub-seasonal-scale dust signals in the troposphere, through the Doppler effect of middle atmospheric zonal winds, transmit modulated energy to the DW1 in the upper mesosphere, thereby facilitating interlayer atmospheric interactions. The radiative heating from dust activities enhances the residual mean meridional circulation, which, under the influence of the Coriolis force, further accelerates the westerlies. Although gravity wave activity also contributes to the acceleration of the westerlies, its forcing generally remains below 5 m/s, which is relatively weak compared to the impact of intense dust activities in the warm scenario experiments (approximately 20 m/s). Overall, this study quantifies the interactions among atmospheric layers by means of PDC technology and analytically demonstrates how dust energy is transferred to mesospheric tides by shaping the zonal winds in between. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring Planetary Environments with Remote Sensing Techniques)
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13 pages, 2594 KiB  
Communication
Morphology of the Excited Hydroxyl in the Martian Atmosphere: A Model Study—Where to Search for Airglow on Mars?
by Dmitry S. Shaposhnikov, Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly, Alexander S. Medvedev, Gerd Reinhold Sonnemann and Paul Hartogh
Remote Sens. 2024, 16(2), 291; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs16020291 - 11 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Monitoring excited hydroxyl (OH*) airglow is broadly used for characterizing the state and dynamics of the terrestrial atmosphere. Recently, the existence of excited hydroxyl was confirmed using satellite observations in the Martian atmosphere. The location and timing of its detection on Mars were [...] Read more.
Monitoring excited hydroxyl (OH*) airglow is broadly used for characterizing the state and dynamics of the terrestrial atmosphere. Recently, the existence of excited hydroxyl was confirmed using satellite observations in the Martian atmosphere. The location and timing of its detection on Mars were restricted to a winter season at the north pole. We present three-dimensional global simulations of excited hydroxyl over a Martian year. The predicted spatio-temporal distribution of the OH* can provide guidance for future observations, namely by indicating where and when the airglow is likely to be detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring Planetary Environments with Remote Sensing Techniques)
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