Special Issue "Earth Observation Technologies for Monitoring of Water Environments"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuseppe Ruello
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: remote sensing; SAR; Earth observation; electromagnetic scattering
Dr. Donato Amitrano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Surrey Space Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: remote sensing; SAR; Earth observation; electromagnetic scattering, computer vision; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water covers a large part of our planet and is essential for human life. Water woes, strictly linked with food security, climate change, and the most important challenges for humans, affect millions of people all over the world. Earth observation is an essential resource to provide crucial information for an integrated water resource management.

With this Special Issue, we intend to bring out the most recent Earth Observation technologies for monitoring oceans, wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal environments.

In particular, we solicit contributions describing:

  • Innovative methodologies for detecting water bodies with synthetic aperture radar and/or multispectral sensors;
  • Models and simulations of the electromagnetic scattering from the water surface, also in the presence of surface active materials;
  • Applications of Earth observation techniques for monitoring water scarcity, water quality, and water pollution;
  • Applications of remote sensing to water resource management;
  • Remote sensing data assimilation within hydrological models.

Review papers are also welcome.

Dr. Giuseppe Ruello
Dr. Donato Amitrano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Earth observation
  • Synthetic aperture radar
  • Multispectral
  • Marine environment
  • Wetlands
  • Internal water monitoring
  • Water quality
  • Water scarcity
  • Water management
  • Oil slick detection
  • Flooding

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessing a Prototype Database for Comprehensive Global Aquatic Land Cover Mapping
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(19), 4012; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13194012 - 07 Oct 2021
Viewed by 335
Abstract
The monitoring of Global Aquatic Land Cover (GALC) plays an essential role in protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems. Although many GALC datasets have been created before, a uniform and comprehensive GALC dataset is lacking to meet multiple user needs. This study aims to [...] Read more.
The monitoring of Global Aquatic Land Cover (GALC) plays an essential role in protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems. Although many GALC datasets have been created before, a uniform and comprehensive GALC dataset is lacking to meet multiple user needs. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of using existing global datasets to develop a comprehensive and user-oriented GALC database and identify the gaps of current datasets in GALC mapping. Eight global datasets were reframed to construct a three-level (i.e., from general to detailed) prototype database for 2015, conforming with the United Nations Land Cover Classification System (LCCS)-based GALC characterization framework. An independent validation was done, and the overall results show some limitations of current datasets in comprehensive GALC mapping. The Level-1 map had considerable commission errors in delineating the general GALC distribution. The Level-2 maps were good at characterizing permanently flooded areas and natural aquatic types, while accuracies were poor in the mapping of temporarily flooded and waterlogged areas as well as artificial aquatic types; vegetated aquatic areas were also underestimated. The Level-3 maps were not sufficient in characterizing the detailed life form types (e.g., trees, shrubs) for aquatic land cover. However, the prototype GALC database is flexible to derive user-specific maps and has important values to aquatic ecosystem management. With the evolving earth observation opportunities, limitations in the current GALC characterization can be addressed in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earth Observation Technologies for Monitoring of Water Environments)
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Article
Continuous Monitoring of the Flooding Dynamics in the Albufera Wetland (Spain) by Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 Datasets
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(17), 3525; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13173525 - 05 Sep 2021
Viewed by 452
Abstract
Satellite data are very useful for the continuous monitoring of ever-changing environments, such as wetlands. In this study, we investigated the use of multispectral imagery to monitor the winter evolution of land cover in the Albufera wetland (Spain), using Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 datasets. [...] Read more.
Satellite data are very useful for the continuous monitoring of ever-changing environments, such as wetlands. In this study, we investigated the use of multispectral imagery to monitor the winter evolution of land cover in the Albufera wetland (Spain), using Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 datasets. With multispectral data, the frequency of observation is limited by the possible presence of clouds. To overcome this problem, the data acquired by the two missions, Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2, were jointly used, thus roughly halving the revisit time. The varied types of land cover were grouped into four classes: (1) open water, (2) mosaic of water, mud and vegetation, (3) bare soil and (4) vegetated soil. The automatic classification of the four classes was obtained through a rule-based method that combined the NDWI, MNDWI and NDVI indices. Point information, provided by geo-located ground pictures, was spatially extended with the help of a very high-resolution image (GeoEye-1). In this way, surfaces with known land cover were obtained and used for the validation of the classification method. The overall accuracy was found to be 0.96 and 0.98 for Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2, respectively. The consistency evaluation between Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 was performed in six days, in which acquisitions by both missions were available. The observed dynamics of the land cover were highly variable in space. For example, the presence of the open water condition lasted for around 60–80 days in the areas closest to the Albufera lake and progressively decreased towards the boundaries of the park. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using moderate-resolution multispectral images to monitor land cover changes in wetland environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earth Observation Technologies for Monitoring of Water Environments)
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