Special Issue "Estimation of the Surface Solar Irradiance Using Remotely Sensed Data"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing Image Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Edoardo Geraldi
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, National Research Council (IMAA/CNR), 85050 Tito Scalo, Potenza, Italy
Interests: remote sensing; solar resource; renewable energy; GIS; urban solar; building science; IRT; smart cities
Dr. Panagiotis Kosmopoulos
E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Penteli, Greece
Interests: environmental research; sustainable development; smart cities; earth observation; solar energy; clouds forecasting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Filomena Romano
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, National Research Council (IMAA/CNR), 85050 Tito Scalo, Potenza, Italy
Interests: cloud remote sensing; cloud radiative forcing; cloud detection and classification; cloud microphysical properties; surface solar irradiance
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface solar irradiance (SSI) is a key parameter of the Earth surface radiation budget affecting surface–atmosphere interactions which drive radiative, hydrological, and land surface processes and greatly influence the weather and climate.

Facing climate change effects, the global interest toward sustainable solutions for the reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions is increasing. and consequently, there is a growing demand for accurate knowledge of solar radiation at the Earth surface.

Remotely sensed data enable a better spatial and temporal coverage of the SSI, making its estimation of primary interest for a wide range of applications in atmospheric sciences (weather and climate prediction models), engineering (solar power generation, solar heating, renewable energy, energy management), architecture (energy efficiency in building design), agricultural sciences (evaporation and irrigation, precision farming), as well as in the health sector (Ultraviolet Index, Vitamin D effective dose) and in several fields of the natural sciences.

In this context, the estimation of SSI with remotely sensed data is a very active research domain, and in recent years, several algorithms and models, based on different approaches, have been developed to improve the accuracy of the estimate.

The Special Issue aims to highlight latest contributions from research that address all aspects of SSI estimation using remotely sensed data, ranging from scientific fundamentals up to applicative needs. In addition, this issue will highlight the latest scientific and technological developments in this field of study.

Manuscripts on all aspects related to estimation of the SSI using remotely sensed data are therefore welcome, focusing on models, methods, validations, and data products, to gain insight on the current research status.

Paper topics may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • High-resolution solar resource assessment;
  • Cloud and aerosol effects;
  • Short-term and intra-day SSI forecasting through assimilation of remotely sensed data;
  • Corrections for 3D cloud effects;
  • Modeling approaches;
  • Separation models;
  • Site adaptation techniques;
  • Spatial-scale mismatch of remotely sensed data;
  • Urban environment irradiance modelling based on remotely sensed data.

Dr. Edoardo Geraldi
Dr. Panagiotis Kosmopoulos
Dr. Filomena Romano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Surface solar irradiance
  • Remote sensing
  • Solar forecasting
  • Radiative forcing
  • Models
  • Solar power generation and management
  • Site adaptation techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effects of Aerosols and Clouds on the Levels of Surface Solar Radiation and Solar Energy in Cyprus
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(12), 2319; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13122319 - 13 Jun 2021
Viewed by 853
Abstract
Cyprus plans to drastically increase the share of renewable energy sources from 13.9% in 2020 to 22.9% in 2030. Solar energy can play a key role in the effort to fulfil this goal. The potential for production of solar energy over the island [...] Read more.
Cyprus plans to drastically increase the share of renewable energy sources from 13.9% in 2020 to 22.9% in 2030. Solar energy can play a key role in the effort to fulfil this goal. The potential for production of solar energy over the island is much higher than most of European territory because of the low latitude of the island and the nearly cloudless summers. In this study, high quality and fine resolution satellite retrievals of aerosols and dust, from the newly developed MIDAS climatology, and information for clouds from CM SAF are used in order to quantify the effects of aerosols, dust, and clouds on the levels of surface solar radiation for 2004–2017 and the corresponding financial loss for different types of installations for the production of solar energy. Surface solar radiation climatology has also been developed based on the above information. Ground-based measurements were also incorporated to study the contribution of different species to the aerosol mixture and the effects of day-to-day variability of aerosols on SSR. Aerosols attenuate 5–10% of the annual global horizontal irradiation and 15–35% of the annual direct normal irradiation, while clouds attenuate 25–30% and 35–50% respectively. Dust is responsible for 30–50% of the overall attenuation by aerosols and is the main regulator of the variability of total aerosol. All-sky annual global horizontal irradiation increased significantly in the period of study by 2%, which was mainly attributed to changes in cloudiness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Estimation of the Surface Solar Irradiance Using Remotely Sensed Data)
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