Special Issue "Advances in Marine and Maritime Applications of SAR"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing Image Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giacomo De Carolis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), via Bassini, 15, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: SAR; optical imagery; ocean winds; waves; sea ice
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca De Santi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) - National Research Council of Italy (CNR) - via Bassini, 15 - 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: ocean waves; winds; sea ice; wave propagation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Virginia Zamparelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Neaples 80124, Italy
Interests: SAR; SAR focusing; sea surface currents; marine parameters
Dr. Gianfranco Fornaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Neaples 80124, Italy
Interests: SAR; interferometric and tomographic SAR; inverse SAR
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery has demonstrated, over the past decade, its capability to provide unique features related to sea surface mapping, either connected to air–sea processes or pertinent to the maritime surveillance of coastal areas. Today, there is a wealthy availability of orbiting SAR satellites, operated as a single instrument or arranged in constellations, equipped with advanced sensing characteristics, including multipolarization acquisition capabilities. These are the result of very recent initiatives from national and international space agencies—among them the COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation (CSG) quad-pol, X-band SAR, launched in December 2019, which integrates the already operational (four satellite) X-band SAR COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation, managed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI); the series of Chinese Gaofen satellites, the latest of which, Gaofen-7, was launched in November 2019, which carry multipolarized C-band SAR instruments; the Canadian Radarsat Constellation Mission (RCM) involving three satellites, each carrying identical C-band quad-pol SAR instruments specifically developed for maritime surveillance; and the SAOCOM program with the polarimetric L-band SAR, managed by CONAE Argentina's Space Agency. Finally, the C-band SAR sensor pair, each one onboard the Sentinel-1 satellites, is the European effort within the Copernicus initiative of SAR constellation for environmental monitoring and surveillance of the sea.

This Special Issue, entitled “Advances in Marine and Maritime Applications of SAR” is aimed at stimulating studies to optimize SAR configurations in terms of frequency and polarization combinations, which are best suited for marine and maritime applications. This can be achieved either by taking advantage of the available spaceborne SARs or by exploiting synergy between SAR and optical imagery. The description of relevant case studies concerned with marine and maritime applications where the use of SAR has been prominent is also welcome.

The topics of this Special Issue will include, without being limited to, the following subjects:

  • Maritime surveillance case studies such as oil-spill monitoring, navigation in sea ice infested waters, ship detection, ship traffic;
  • Mapping of the marine environment: high-resolution wind fields, coastal wave fields, shoreline changes, upwelling phenomena, roll vortices, currents, fronts, gravity waves, internal waves, rain cells;
  • Shallow water bathymetry;
  • PolSAR and InSAR methods to improve maritime surveillance;
  • Innovative SAR/InSAR concepts for optimal sensing of the marine environment.

Dr. Giacomo De Carolis
Dr. Francesca De Santi
Dr. Virginia Zamparelli
Dr. Gianfranco Fornaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocean winds, wave, currents, bathymetry
  • oil spill, algal blooms
  • sea ice
  • coastline
  • ship detection and ship traffic
  • InSAR
  • PolSAR

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Spatiotemporal Changes of Coastline over the Yellow River Delta in the Previous 40 Years with Optical and SAR Remote Sensing
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(10), 1940; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13101940 - 16 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 626
Abstract
The integration of multi-source, multi-temporal, multi-band optical, and radar remote sensing images to accurately detect, extract, and monitor the long-term dynamic change of coastline is critical for a better understanding of how the coastal environment responds to climate change and human activities. In [...] Read more.
The integration of multi-source, multi-temporal, multi-band optical, and radar remote sensing images to accurately detect, extract, and monitor the long-term dynamic change of coastline is critical for a better understanding of how the coastal environment responds to climate change and human activities. In this study, we present a combination method to produce the spatiotemporal changes of the coastline in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) in 1980–2020 with both optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite remote sensing images. According to the measurement results of GPS RTK, this method can obtain a high accuracy of shoreline extraction, with an observation error of 71.4% within one pixel of the image. Then, the influence of annual water discharge and sediment load on the changes of the coastline is investigated. The results show that there are two significant accretion areas in the Qing 8 and Qingshuigou course. The relative high correlation illustrates that the sediment discharge has a great contribution to the change of estuary area. Human activities, climate change, and sea level rise that affect waves and storm surges are also important drivers of coastal morphology to be investigated in the future, in addition to the sediment transport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Marine and Maritime Applications of SAR)
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