Special Issue "Multiscale and Multitemporal High-Resolution Remote Sensing for Archaeology"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing Image Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lara De Giorgi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Cultural Heritage Sciences (ISPC) – National Research Council (CNR), Lecce, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; 4D data modelling
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giovanni Leucci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Cultural Heritage Sciences (ISPC) – National Research Council (CNR), Lecce, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; archaeology; forensics; engineering; geology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The availability of high-resolution remote sensing techniques provides multiscale and multitemporal approaches to the study of ancient settlements and landscapes in order to reconstruct the development over the centuries. At present, this research requires the integration of different high-resolution remote sensing techniques: satellite (optical and radar data), aerial (photos, IR, and Lidar data) from airplanes and UAVs, as well as ground-based observations (integration of different geophysical techniques, field walking, DGPS topographical surveys). These investigations are based on a geoarchaeological approach, and are aimed at both historical reconstruction and the production of tools for preventive archaeology and the preservation of archaeological and monumental heritage.

The main topics will be:

- Satellite remote sensing for archaeology using optical and radar data: new perspectives, semiautomatic and automatic approaches for extracting cultural information, study of the interconnection between environmental changes and dynamics of human frequentation;
- Aerial archaeology: from historical and traditional air-photos to IR and Lidar data;
- Integration of ground remote sensing techniques (geophysical prospecting) and field walking and DGPS topographical surveys for the study of ancient settlements and landscapes;
- Integration of non-invasive methods for the preservation and protection of monumental heritage.

Dr. Lara De Giorgi
Dr. Giovanni Leucci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • satellite remote sensing
  • aerial archaeology
  • ground-penetrating radar
  • magnetometry
  • electrical resistivity tomography

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Ground-Penetrating Radar Prospections in Lecce Cathedral: New Data about the Crypt and the Structures under the Church
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(9), 1692; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13091692 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 611
Abstract
Lecce is a city located in the southern part of the Apulia region (south Italy). Its subsoil is rich in the remains of superimposed ancient settlements from the Messapian period (7th–3rd century BC) to the Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Lecce Cathedral [...] Read more.
Lecce is a city located in the southern part of the Apulia region (south Italy). Its subsoil is rich in the remains of superimposed ancient settlements from the Messapian period (7th–3rd century BC) to the Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Lecce Cathedral is one of the most important buildings in the town. It was built in the 12th century and transformed in the 16th and 17th centuries. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were carried out in the cathedral and its crypt with the aim to evidence both probably buried structures related to the known crypt and other features such as tombs. The GPR investigations allow us to locate many features under the floor of the church. Some of them are unknown and could belong to the previous building of the Romanesque period. Furthermore, most of the identified structures are related to tombs and underground rooms (ossuaries). Under the crypt floor, six tombs of the 19th and 20th centuries and other ancient structures were documented. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

TITLE: Principles and Practice of Investigating Buried Adobe Features with Ground-Penetrating Radar

 

AUTHORS:

Scott Byram, University of California, Berkeley

Jun Sunseri, University of California, Berkeley

 

CONTACT:

Scott Byram (corresponding author), Research Affiliate

Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

2251 College Ave.

Berkeley, CA 94720

[email protected]

510-508-1535

 

Jun Sunseri, Assistant Professor

Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

232 Kroeber Hall, MC3710

Berkeley, CA 94720

[email protected]

Abstract

Because so many ancestral populations, at one time or another, designed and lived within the constraints of earthen architectural technology, it has significant representation in building traditions across large temporal and geographic expanses. Adobe, also known also as dagga, ferey, cob, and other names is a variant in which soil and other materials are formulated into discrete construction components, often in communities of practice for which adobe recipes, preparation, and application are integral to daily intersections of home and community. For archaeologists, community partners, and our interested publics who wish to learn more about it, a large portion of this architectural culture is no longer visible above the surface but is accessible through archaeology.  Yet low impact sampling such as probing and test excavation rarely reveals adobe features.  Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) allows a tantalizing and non-invasive perspective on subsurface adobe features, for which research and interpretation can run afoul of the very same limitations from which traditional archaeological field techniques, language, and thinking suffer.  Increasingly there is a buried structural landscape emerging at sites where adobe architecture prevailed.  The case studies presented here serve as a guide for further survey.

Keywords

adobe; ground-penetrating radar; geophysics; historical archaeology, interiography

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