Special Issue "Advances in Water Resource Monitoring and Modelling: Water Quantity and Quality Issues"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Diego Copetti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNR-Water Research Institute, 20861 Brugherio (MB), Italy
Interests: applied ecology; water quality; biogeochemistry; environmental monitoring and modelling; management of water resources; climate change impact on surface waters; sustainability; ecosystem services
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in environmental monitoring and modelling can help in the management of water resources. The availability of water is being put at risk by pressures acting at both the local (e.g., nutrient/pollutant loads) and the global (e.g., climate change) scale. The increasing pressure on water resources can be either quantitative or qualitative threats. Monitoring of the water resource thus has to cover both of these aspects. In recent years, there has been an increase in data availability, including both in situ and remote-sensing data. If, on the one hand, the availability of these big datasets is increasing our knowledge on aquifers, on the other hand, the management of these data implies the development of advanced tools to validate, store and process these data. The use of advanced mathematical and statistical models is a central aspect of this rapidly evolving field of research. Models, in fact, are fundamental tools for predicting water availability and quality, in relation to different potential uses (e.g., irrigational, drinking supply), and under both local and global stresses. This Special Issue deals with advances in all of the different fields of research related to monitoring and modelling water research, including: in situ sensor and sensor network development, advances in remote sensing data acquisition, data storage and validation, statistical and process-based model implementation. Contributions dealing with methods to merge modelled and measured data (e.g., data assimilation techniques) or data driven computational methods (e.g., machine learning) are also welcome.

Dr. Diego Copetti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensors
  • sensors network
  • remote sensing
  • process based models
  • statistical models
  • machine learning methods
  • data assimilation techniques
  • water quantity
  • water quality
  • water management
  • sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Influence of Hydrologic Alteration on Sediment, Dissolved Load and Nutrient Downstream Transfer Continuity in a River: Example Lower Brda River Cascade Dams (Poland)
Resources 2021, 10(7), 70; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10070070 - 01 Jul 2021
Viewed by 649
Abstract
Hydrologic alternation of river systems is an essential factor of human activity. Cascade-dammed waters are characterized by the disturbed outflow of material from the catchment. Changes in sediment, dissolved load and nutrient balance are among the base indicators of water resource monitoring. This [...] Read more.
Hydrologic alternation of river systems is an essential factor of human activity. Cascade-dammed waters are characterized by the disturbed outflow of material from the catchment. Changes in sediment, dissolved load and nutrient balance are among the base indicators of water resource monitoring. This research was based on the use of hydrological and water quality data (1984–2017) and the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) method to determine the influence of river regime changes on downstream transfer continuity of sediments and nutrients in the example of the Lower Brda river cascade dams (Poland). Two types of regimes were used: hydropeaking (1984–2000) and run–of–river (2001–2017). Using the IHA method and water quality data, a qualitative and quantitative relationship were demonstrated between changes of regime operation and sediment and nutrient balance. The use of sites above and below the cascade made it possible to determine sediment, dissolved load, and nutrient trapping and removing processes. Studies have shown that changes in operation regime influenced the supply chain and continuity of sediment and nutrient transport in cascade-dammed rivers. The conducted research showed that sustainable management of sediment and nutrient in the alternated catchment helps achieve good ecological status of the water. Full article
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Article
Risk Assessment of Lack of Water Supply Using the Hydraulic Model of the Water Supply
Resources 2021, 10(5), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10050043 - 05 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
Modern management of water supply systems is based on a preventive strategy consisting of the prevention of failures and crisis situations. Water pipe failures resulting in a lack of water supply for a long period pose a threat to the water consumers safety. [...] Read more.
Modern management of water supply systems is based on a preventive strategy consisting of the prevention of failures and crisis situations. Water pipe failures resulting in a lack of water supply for a long period pose a threat to the water consumers safety. The aim of the work was to present the methodology and develop a risk map of lack of water supply to consumers. The article presents a failures simulation of the main pipes transporting treated water from the water treatment plant to the city carried out using the EPANET 2.0. software. The simulation results made it possible to determine the consequences of failures by determining the number of inhabitants (consumers) affected with lack of water supply as a result of failure of the main pipes near the water treatment plant WTP which, together with the failure rate, were used to prepare risk maps of lack of water supply. The developed method was presented on the water supply network located in Central and Eastern Europe. It was found that the highest risk of lack of water supply is related to the failure of the M3 main pipe, which transports water to the eastern and north-eastern parts of the city. It is recommended to modernize the M3 main pipe, which will reduce the number of failures resulting in a lack of water supply. Full article
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Article
An Approach to Analysing Water Consumers’ Acceptance of Risk-Reduction Costs
Resources 2020, 9(11), 132; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources9110132 - 06 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 680
Abstract
The proper operation of a water supply system (WSS) requires constant investment. The priority is to provide residents with high quality potable water, in the required quantity and pressure, in accordance with the applicable regulations. The paper presents an assessment of the potential [...] Read more.
The proper operation of a water supply system (WSS) requires constant investment. The priority is to provide residents with high quality potable water, in the required quantity and pressure, in accordance with the applicable regulations. The paper presents an assessment of the potential inherent operational risk of a WSS in support of the risk-based investment management process. It is of high importance to invest in the operational safety as it concerns both producers and consumers. The investment engenders additional costs that should partially be supported by the consumers. Thus, the paper presents a methodology to analyse consumers’ readiness to accept water supply services’ additional costs. The proposed methods may underpin a comprehensive program for risk-based investment management and operational decision-making. The case study and the approach in this article concern one particular regional WSS, based on information collected from water consumers. The assessment suggests a willingness to tolerate additional costs in view of enhancing the performance of the water supply services. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

type: review

An Overview of Earth Observation Derived Products for Water Quality Monitoring and Management

Bresciani Mariano, Giardino Claudia, Free Gary and Pinardi Monica

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