Special Issue "Driver Behavior Safety Research in Road Transportation"

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Andrew Morris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Loughborough Design School, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK
Interests: traffic safety; crash investigation; driver behaviour; autonomous vehicles
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my great pleasure to serve as the Guest Editor for the Special Issue “Driver Behaviour and Safety” to be published in Safety.

Road Transport has become an increasingly safe mode of travel in recent times, but some Mobility and Safety challenges remain outstanding. Many of these safety challenges involve human factors and driver behaviour – particularly when considering driver interaction with new vehicle information systems, usability/user-acceptance and user experience.  Such issues are likely to become even more prevalent in the future due to the rapid global move towards vehicle automation. Therefore, this special issue offers readers a look at some of key emerging issues within transport safety and driver behaviour and how human factors challenges associated with progress in these domains are being overcome. Key topics will include;

o    Human Machine Interaction 
o    Transition of Control
o    Driver state
o    Driver workload and task demand
o    Interaction of (partly) automated vehicles with vulnerable road users
o    Human factors in mixed traffic conditions
o    Older drivers / novice drivers
o    Naturalistic Driving studies

Prof. Dr. Andrew Morris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Driver behaviour
  • Connected and Autonomous Vehicles
  • Driver in the loop
  • Active and integrated safety

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
“Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances
Safety 2021, 7(3), 57; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030057 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1154
Abstract
Despite the well-known distracting effects, many drivers still engage in phone use, especially texting and especially among young drivers, with new emerging messaging modes. The present study aims to examine the effects of different answering modes on driving performance. Twenty-four students (12 females), [...] Read more.
Despite the well-known distracting effects, many drivers still engage in phone use, especially texting and especially among young drivers, with new emerging messaging modes. The present study aims to examine the effects of different answering modes on driving performance. Twenty-four students (12 females), aged between 19 and 25 years (M = 20.83, SD = 1.53), volunteered for the study. They accomplished the Lane Change Task (LCT) with baseline and dual-task runs in a driving simulator. In dual-task runs, participants answered text messages on a smartphone by voice or text message with varying task complexity. Driving performance was measured by lane deviation (LCT) and subjective measures (NASA-TLX). Across all trials, driving performance deteriorated during dual-task runs compared with the baseline runs, and subjective demand increased. Analysis of dual-task runs showed a benefit for voice-based answering to received text messages that leveled off in the complex task. All in all, the benefits of using voice-based answering in comparison with text-based answering were found regarding driving performance and subjective measures. Nevertheless, this benefit was mostly lost in the complex task, and both the driving performance and the demand measured in the baseline conditions could not be reached. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver Behavior Safety Research in Road Transportation)
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Article
Cooperation between Roads and Vehicles: Field Validation of a Novel Infrastructure-Based Solution for All Road Users’ Safety
Safety 2021, 7(2), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7020039 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1676
Abstract
Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) are expected to considerably influence road safety, traffic efficiency and comfort. Nevertheless, their market penetration is still limited, on the one hand due to the high costs of installation and maintenance of the infrastructures and, on the other [...] Read more.
Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) are expected to considerably influence road safety, traffic efficiency and comfort. Nevertheless, their market penetration is still limited, on the one hand due to the high costs of installation and maintenance of the infrastructures and, on the other hand, due to the price of support automated driving functions. A breakthrough C-ITS technological solution was studied, designed, built and tested that is based on the implementation of custom low-cost on-road platforms (named “strips”) that embed micro/nano sensors, communication technologies and energy harvesting to shift intelligence from the vehicle to the road infrastructure. The strips, through a V2X and LTE communication gateway, transmit real-time, reliable and accurate information at lane level about the environmental and road condition, the traffic and the other road users’ position and speed. The exchanged information supports a series of C-ITS functions and services extending equipped vehicles capabilities and providing similar functions to non-equipped ones (including powered two wheelers). The general framework and the technological solution proposed is presented and the results of the field trials, conducted in three pilot sites around Europe, quantify the promising system performance as well as the positive effects of the C-ITS applications developed and tested on driver/rider’s behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver Behavior Safety Research in Road Transportation)
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Article
What, Who, and When? The Perceptions That Young Drivers and Parents Have of Driving Simulators for Use in Driver Education
Safety 2020, 6(4), 46; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety6040046 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3578
Abstract
Driver education providers may utilise technologies such as driving simulators to augment their existing courses. Understanding the perceptions that young drivers and parents have of simulators may help to make simulator-based driver education more accepted and more likely to be effective. Young drivers [...] Read more.
Driver education providers may utilise technologies such as driving simulators to augment their existing courses. Understanding the perceptions that young drivers and parents have of simulators may help to make simulator-based driver education more accepted and more likely to be effective. Young drivers and parents completed an online questionnaire that included a “simulator invention” visualisation task. Items based on the Goals for Driver Education framework investigated perceptions of the most appropriate skill type, while others examined the most suitable target group for simulator training, and timing in relation to completing a formal driver education course for simulator training to occur. Both groups perceived that simulators were most appropriate for training a combination of physical, traffic, psychological, and social driving skills with learner drivers during attendance at a novice driver education program. Young drivers and parents had similar perceptions regarding the amount that each skill type should be trained using a simulator. Understanding the perceptions of young drivers and parents, and especially those who are somewhat naïve to the use of driving simulators, may aid in the introduction and administration of simulator training and may increase the effectiveness of driver education as a crash countermeasure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver Behavior Safety Research in Road Transportation)
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