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Special Issue "Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wearables for Sports Performance Analysis and Injury Prevention"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Wearables".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hadi Nobari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physical Education and Sports, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
2. HEME Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
3. Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-7344, Iran
4. Sports Scientist, Sepahan Football Club, Isfahan 81887-78473, Iran
Interests: sports performance; growth of youth and maturation; external load monitoring; training load; well-being; soccer training; injury prevention; strength and conditioning; sports nutrition and supplement; quality of life; reliability; validity of devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Luca Paolo Ardigo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Exercise and Sport Science, Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, 37100 Verona, Italy
Interests: training load monitoring; physical activity; metabolic expenditure; motor control; sport technology; testing; training
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jorge Pérez-Gómez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health, Economy, Motricity, and Education (HEME) Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, The University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: football training; injury prevention; physiology; physical and sports activities as a strategy to promote a healthy society; physical activity interventions; exercise training physical exercise; physical health; assessment of physical capacity; global health; health; quality of life in groups of subjects and active lifestyle; osteoporosis; fall prevention; body composition
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rafael Oliveira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. ESDRM-IPS - Sports Science School of Rio Maior – Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, Av. Dr. Mário Soares, 2040-413 Rio Maior, Portugal
2. CIEQV – Life Quality Research Centre, Complexo Andaluz, Apartado 279, 2001-904 Santarém, Portugal
3. CIDESD - Research Center in Sport Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, Quinta de Prados, Edifício Ciências de Desporto, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: physiology; physical activity and healthy lifestyle; exercise training programs; assessment of physical capacity; health; osteoporosis; fall prevention; body composition; strength and conditioning, sports performance, soccer training, injury prevention, and training load
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Basilio Pueo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University Institute for Computing Research, Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Education, University of Alicante, 03013 Alicante, Spain
Interests: sport; biomechanics; instrumentation; audio; video; performance; technology; rowing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to participate to this Special Issue entitled “Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wearables for Sports Performance Analysis and Injury Prevention” in Sensors.

In recent years, and with the advancement of wearable sensor technologies in the field of external monitoring training loads, clubs and sports scientists have become interested in achieving an appropriate level of training load indices for athletes in various team sports to minimize load-induced injuries. Players accumulate fatigue as the season progresses, and when the training load/matches increase in conjunction with insufficient recovery, players may enter a non-functional overreaching state (NFOR) and overreaching training syndrome (OTS) marked by decrements in performance. This challenge is particularly important for sports clubs in managing the fatigue and recovery of athletes with the prevention of NFOR, OTS, and possible injuries, which can increase the team success rate and reduce team costs.

Hence, the purpose of this Special Issue is to present the findings of recent research on new approaches to the use of micro-electromechanical systems to prevent injury to team sports athletes. Specifically, the Special Issue will report on the use of micro-electromechanical systems (e.g., global positioning system, location position system, inertial measurement unit) and the relationship with team sports athlete injuries. A team sport setting presents peculiar aspects (e.g., athletes with different physical features and abilities, need for keeping together individual with overall team physical conditioning) deserving specific assessment interventions.

We look forward to your articles!

Dr. Hadi Nobari
Dr. Luca Paolo Ardigo
Dr. Jorge Pérez-Gómez
Dr. Rafael Oliveira
Dr. Basilio Pueo

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Athletes
  • Correct fundamentals execution
  • External workload
  • Fatigue
  • GNSS-tracking
  • Injury
  • IMU for analysis body load tracking
  • LPS
  • Match load
  • Novel applications of external training load
  • NFOR
  • OTS
  • Prevention
  • Pacemaker
  • Performance analysis
  • Professional
  • Reliability devices
  • Training load
  • Validity devices
  • Wearable sensors in sports
  • Wireless sensors for athletic tracking
  • Workload

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Influence of Time Winning and Time Losing on Position-Specific Match Physical Demands in the Top One Spanish Soccer League
Sensors 2021, 21(20), 6843; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21206843 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 291
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of time winning and time losing on position-specific match physical demands with and without ball possession in the top Spanish professional soccer league. All matches played in the First Spanish soccer league [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of time winning and time losing on position-specific match physical demands with and without ball possession in the top Spanish professional soccer league. All matches played in the First Spanish soccer league over four consecutive seasons (from 2015/16 to 2018/19) were recorded using an optical tracking system (i.e., ChyronHego), and the data were analyzed via Mediacoach®. Total distance (TD), and TD > 21 km·h−1 covered with and without ball possession were analyzed using a Linear Mixed Model, taking into account the contextual variables time winning and losing. Results showed that TD and TD > 21 km·h−1 covered by central midfielders (0.01 and 0.005 m/min, respectively), wide midfielders (0.02 and 0.01 m/min, respectively), and forwards (0.03 and 0.02 m/min, respectively) significantly increased while winning (p < 0.05). By contrast, TD and TD > 21 km·h−1 covered by central defenders (0.01 and 0.008 m/min, respectively) and wide defenders (0.06 and 0.008 m/min, respectively) significantly increased while losing (p < 0.05). In addition, for each minute that teams were winning, total distance with ball possession (TDWP) decreased, while, for each minute that teams were losing, TDWP increased. Instead, TDWP > 21 km·h−1 obtained opposite results. Total distance without ball possession increased when teams were winning, and decreased when teams were losing. Therefore, the evolution of scoreline significantly influences tactical–technical and physical demands on soccer matches. Full article
Article
Win, Draw, or Lose? Global Positioning System-Based Variables’ Effect on the Match Outcome: A Full-Season Study on an Iranian Professional Soccer Team
Sensors 2021, 21(17), 5695; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21175695 - 24 Aug 2021
Viewed by 529
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the between-match and between-halves match variability of various Global Positioning System (GPS) variables and metabolic power average (MPA) in competitions, based on the match results obtained by professional soccer players over a full season. Observations [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to determine the between-match and between-halves match variability of various Global Positioning System (GPS) variables and metabolic power average (MPA) in competitions, based on the match results obtained by professional soccer players over a full season. Observations on individual match performance measures were undertaken on thirteen outfield players competing in the Iranian Premier League. The measures selected for analysis included total duration, accelerations in zones (AccZ1, 2, and 3), decelerations in zones (DecZ1, 2, and 3), and MPA collected by the Wearable Inertial Measurement Unit (WIMU). The GPS manufacturer set the thresholds for the variables analyzed as follows: AccZ1 (<2 m·s−2); AccZ2 (2 to 4 m·s−2); AccZ3 (>4 m·s−2); DecZ1 (<−2 m·s−2); DecZ2 (−2 to −4 m·s−2); DecZ3 (>−4 m·s−2). The results revealed significant differences between wins and draws for the duration of the match and draws compared to wins for the first- half duration (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.36 [−0.43, 1.12]), (p ≤ 0.05; ES = −7.0 [−8.78, −4.78], respectively. There were significant differences on AccZ1 during the first-half between draws and defeats (p ≤ 0.05; ES = −0.43 [−1.32, 0.46]), for AccZ3 in the second-half between draws and defeats (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 1.37 [0.48, 2.25]). In addition, there were significant differences between wins and draws (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.22 [−0.62, 1.10]), and wins and defeats for MPA in the first- half (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.34 [−0.65, 1.22]). MPA showed further differences between draws and defeats in the second- half (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.57 [−0.22, 1.35]). Descriptive analysis revealed differences between the first and second half for wins in AccZ2 (p = 0.005), DecZ2 (p = 0.029), and MPA (p = 0.048). In addition, draws showed significant differences between the first and second half in duration, AccZ1, AccZ2, and DecZ2 (p = 0.008), (p = 0.017), (p = 0.040), and (p = 0.037) respectively. Defeats showed differences between the first and second half in AccZ1, AccZ3, and MPA (p = 0.001), (p = 0.018), and (p = 0.003) respectively. In summary, the study reveals large variations between the match duration, accelerometer variables, and MPA both within and between matches. Regardless of the match outcome, the first half seems to produce greater outputs. The results should be considered when performing a half-time re-warm-up, as this may be an additional factor influencing the drop in the intensity markers in the second half in conjunction with factors such as fatigue, pacing strategies, and other contextual variables that may influence the results. Full article
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