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Special Issue "Microelectromechanical Systems in Sports and Exercise"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: football; soccer; match analysis; performance analysis; network analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in sports technology and engineering have served to increase the capacity of objectively measured measures and outcomes in ecological scenarios while, in the past, such analysis would have only been possible in laboratory conditions. The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has improved the ability of small sensors to rapidly extract important information about sports performance and exercise. Real-time monitoring of physiological and biomechanical outcomes is now a common practice in sports performance, exercise, and physical activity, allowing a better assessment and exercise prescription. Following this growing tendency in daily practice, scientific research has focused on determining the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of different MEMS technologies applied in sports, as well as the use of such systems to provide descriptive data about training load or quality of movement in many contexts. However, in order to follow the rapid progression of many technological companies, more scientific evidence is need to confirm the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of different MEMS applied to sports, as well as to confirm their usability in practical scenarios.

Considering that more research should be conducted and published in this field, the aim of this Special Issue, entitled “Microelectromechanical systems in sports and exercise”, is to publish high-quality original investigations and narrative and systematic reviews in the field of microelectromechanical systems applied to sports analysis and exercise. We look forward to receiving contributions related (but not limited) to the following topics: (i) validity, reliability, and sensitivity of MEMS applied to sports and exercise; (ii) use of MEMS for assessment of human and sports performance; and (iii) use of MEMS for monitoring human and sports performance, exercise, or physical activity levels.

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • MEMS
  • inertial measurement unit
  • global navigation satellite system
  • training load monitoring
  • biomechanical analysis
  • sports performance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

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Review
Validity and Reliability of Mobile Applications for Assessing Strength, Power, Velocity, and Change-of-Direction: A Systematic Review
Sensors 2021, 21(8), 2623; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21082623 - 08 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 917
Abstract
This systematic review aimed to (1) identify and summarize studies that have examined the validity of apps for measuring human strength, power, velocity, and change-of-direction, and (2) identify and summarize studies that have examined the reliability of apps for measuring human strength, power, [...] Read more.
This systematic review aimed to (1) identify and summarize studies that have examined the validity of apps for measuring human strength, power, velocity, and change-of-direction, and (2) identify and summarize studies that have examined the reliability of apps for measuring human strength, power, velocity, and change-of-direction. A systematic review of Cochrane Library, EBSCO, PubMed, Scielo, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science databases was performed, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From the 435 studies initially identified, 23 were fully reviewed, and their outcome measures were extracted and analyzed. In total, 11 mobile applications were analyzed and summarized for their validity and reliability to test movement velocity, movement time, movement displacement, power output, and workload. The present systematic review revealed that the tested apps are valid and reliable for measuring bar movement velocity during lower and upper body resistance exercises; however, systematic bias was detected with heavier loads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microelectromechanical Systems in Sports and Exercise)
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Other

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Systematic Review
Wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) Technologies for Fitness Assessment: A Systematic Review
Sensors 2021, 21(16), 5418; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21165418 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 568
Abstract
Wearable and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies in sports open a new era in athlete’s training, not only for performance monitoring and evaluation but also for fitness assessment. These technologies rely on sensor systems that collect, process and transmit relevant data, such as [...] Read more.
Wearable and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies in sports open a new era in athlete’s training, not only for performance monitoring and evaluation but also for fitness assessment. These technologies rely on sensor systems that collect, process and transmit relevant data, such as biomarkers and/or other performance indicators that are crucial to evaluate the evolution of the athlete’s condition, and therefore potentiate their performance. This work aims to identify and summarize recent studies that have used wearables and IoT technologies and discuss its applicability for fitness assessment. A systematic review of electronic databases (WOS, CCC, DIIDW, KJD, MEDLINE, RSCI, SCIELO, IEEEXplore, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane and Web of Science) was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From the 280 studies initially identified, 20 were fully examined in terms of hardware and software and their applicability for fitness assessment. Results have shown that wearable and IoT technologies have been used in sports not only for fitness assessment but also for monitoring the athlete’s internal and external workloads, employing physiological status monitoring and activity recognition and tracking techniques. However, the maturity level of such technologies is still low, particularly with the need for the acquisition of more—and more effective—biomarkers regarding the athlete’s internal workload, which limits its wider adoption by the sports community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microelectromechanical Systems in Sports and Exercise)
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Systematic Review
Validity and Reliability of the Inertial Measurement Unit for Barbell Velocity Assessments: A Systematic Review
Sensors 2021, 21(7), 2511; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21072511 - 03 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1627
Abstract
The use of inertial measurement unit (IMU) has become popular in sports assessment. In the case of velocity-based training (VBT), there is a need to measure barbell velocity in each repetition. The use of IMUs may make the monitoring process easier; however, its [...] Read more.
The use of inertial measurement unit (IMU) has become popular in sports assessment. In the case of velocity-based training (VBT), there is a need to measure barbell velocity in each repetition. The use of IMUs may make the monitoring process easier; however, its validity and reliability should be established. Thus, this systematic review aimed to (1) identify and summarize studies that have examined the validity of wearable wireless IMUs for measuring barbell velocity and (2) identify and summarize studies that have examined the reliability of IMUs for measuring barbell velocity. A systematic review of Cochrane Library, EBSCO, PubMed, Scielo, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science databases was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From the 161 studies initially identified, 22 were fully reviewed, and their outcome measures were extracted and analyzed. Among the eight different IMU models, seven can be considered valid and reliable for measuring barbell velocity. The great majority of IMUs used for measuring barbell velocity in linear trajectories are valid and reliable, and thus can be used by coaches for external load monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microelectromechanical Systems in Sports and Exercise)
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